Herstory (n): a fraught subject and a sad, compelling legacy  bound up as it is in, you know, a culture of violence and disenfranchisement. But in honor of Women's History Month, let's take a flip-book look across countries, decades and ideas at some ladies (those famous, recognized, and not-so-much) who helped shape the way we think, talk, move, dress, and exist. Obviously, this list is abridged: ten billion other photos wouldn't render. 

 

 

First, a personal favorite (yeaaaaaaah 2016!): here's Hillary Clinton in 1969, posing for a feature in Life magazine. This was taken shortly after the former Secretary of State graduated from Wellesley. Man, she's great. 

 

 

Here are two unidentified Armenian Guerilla fighters in 1895. That's right — back in the day, women also fought for Armenian autonomy from Kurdish forces and other intruders. 

 

 

Perhaps you haven't heard of the Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, a front-runner of performance art. She was a provocative poet, the contemporary of various famous men in the avant-garde movement, and initially supported her art by pulling double duty at a cigarette factory and posing as a model...for Man Ray

 

 

Mary Pickford   inaugural America's sweetheart and founding member of the Academy of Motion Pictures — reads a suffragette pamphlet. 

 

 

Miss Elinor Blevins was an actress and auto-enthusiast. Here she is in 1915, beside one of her prize cars. 

 

 

 

 

Lucy Burns
, a prominent suffragette, spent more time in jail than any other woman in the movement. She was arrested six times. 
 

 

 



 

 

 

Huda Shaarawi, founder of the Egyptian Feminist Movement in the 1920s, is pictured above leading a protest. 
 

 

 




Ladies of the Jazz Age, attending a football game.
 

 

 

Here, formidable Vogue editor Diana Vreeland fusses over a model. 

 

 

Above, Eva Peron (or Evita, the briefly beloved First Lady of Argentina) leads a kick-off...

 

 

The mini-skirt was an interesting symbol for some members of the women's rights movement  — it was controversially seen as either a way of embracing independence or a means of sexualizing the female form. We know where much of the Western world landed on this issue today. In fact, shortly after protests like these, some ladies got more brazen:

 

 

...above, an unidentified subject hitches a ride to you-guessed-it: Woodstock. 

 

 

Carol Hansich was a pillar of the radical feminist sect of the women's movement in the 1960s. You may know her best from this famous essay, or its central rhetoric: "the personal is political." 

 

 

Two women in power: one an apt and courageous politician, the other a lasting icon of grace. Indira Gandhi and Jackie O. 

 

 

Political activist Angela Davis leads a protest in Philadelphia, 1972. Rumor has it that Toni Morrison's also in this picture. Behind that iconic and absolutely-amazing hair. 

 

Image courtesy of Making Waves Films.com

Patsy Mink, a third-generation Japanese American, served twelve terms in the House of Representatives. She was the first woman of color in the legislature, and an architect of Title IX. 

 

Image courtesy of Psycologiadelarte.com 

Flashing forward a few decades: here's a still from one of Annie Sprinkle's solo shows. Ms. Sprinkle is a sex educator, writer, former adult-film actress, and perhaps the most intelligent authority on the carnal (or should I say, the human). 

 

 

I just really like this picture. 

 

Image courtesy of The Daily Mail. 

And I'd be remiss to leave out Yonce, right? Say what you will, but she's the BOSS. 

 

Image courtesy of Politico. 

And for the last stop on our round-the-mostly-Western-world tour:  politician Wendy Davis. Ms. Davis recently rocked the boat when she led an elaborate filibuster against legislation proposing to dissolve many abortion clinics in her native Texas. She literally stood up (for hours) in the name of women's rights. 

Feels pretty good to be a star in this sky, no? 

 

All undesignated images courtesy of Pinterest. 

Tagged in: women's movement, women's history month, women's history, wendy davis, tina fey, suffragette, patsy mink, old photos, mary pickford, lucy burns, janeane garofalo, Jackie O, indira gandhi, Huda Shaarawi, hillary clinton, evita, eva peron, elinor blevins, Egyptian feminist movement, diana vreeland, carol hanisch, beyonce, baroness elsa von freytag-loringhoven, annie sprinkle, Angela Davis, Amy Poehler   

The opinions expressed on the BUST blog are those of the authors themselves and do not necessarily reflect the position of BUST Magazine or its staff.




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