Lady-power, as it turns out, isn’t just limited to humans. Many people think of the animal world as more traditionally gendered, but badass females actually transcend species. Here is just a taste of the awesomeness:

1. Lady-bonobos 

Female bonobos are sexually liberated.  Bonobo societies are matriarchies, with females living at the top of their group’s social pyramid.  A high ranking bonobo’s male offspring will go on to become a leader among the males in the social group, but he will never usurp his mother’s position.  Bonobos are also one of the few species that have recreational sex— with multiple partners of both genders, no less!

 2. Lady-lions 

Female lions aren’t known for their domesticity— in fact they are the ones who do most of the hunting for their pride.  They are much more adept at hunting than their male counterparts!  The typical lion family is always centered around its ladies— a group of related females which bring home the bacon. 

3. Lady- Barbary Macaques 

Female Barbary Macaques totally fake it.  But for a surprising reason: females are extremely vocal during sex because they are looking to attract other potential mates.  It may have another aim as well: to make her beau climax more quickly.  Either way, Ms. barbary macaque is taking control of her reproductive process! 

4. Lady- komodo dragons

Komo dragon ladies?  They don’t need no man!  Literally!  The liberated lizard ladies have been known to reproduce without mating— a process called parthenogenesis. 

5. Lady- ducks

Female ducks have built in rape-prevention!  Their vaginas spiral clockwise in a series of sharp twists and turns, while male ducks’ penises spiral counter-clockwise.  It is theorized that the female duck evolved this venereal labyrinth in order to prevent guy ducks from trying to go too far—and students at Yale have confirmed that it works! 

6. Lady bees

The honey bees’ hive society is as high society as it gets—their caste system is run by a queen bee and staffed by female worker bees, who select and raise their queen.  The males in the hive, called “drones,” die once they have mated with their queen, and play no other role. 

7.  Lady- topi antelope 

Topi antelope ladies are only fertile one day per year.  But during that 24-hour period they certainly do keep busy, essentially hounding their male counterpoints to the point of exhaustion.  Talk about taking initiative!  They certainly don’t wait for a nice gentleman-antelope to ask them out first!  (In fact, the guys tend to have a far lower sex drive!) 

8. Lady- anglerfish

Female anglerfish are basically super single mothers: in many species of ceratioid anglerfish, the (much smaller) male attaches himself to the lady and proceeds to atrophy to the point that he becomes, essentially, a parasitic fish-penis available to his hostess whenever necessary. 

 

Know of any others?  Leave a comment below and tell us about it! 

 

This post is based on a piece at thedodo.comCheck it out!  

 

Images courtesy of thedodo.com, worldwildlife.org, jogjis.com, monkeyland.co.za, nationalgeographic, knockoutpest.com, and animal-backgrounds.com.  

Tagged in: sexual empowerment, science, reproduction, queen bee, lions, ducks, climax, animals   

The opinions expressed on the BUST blog are those of the authors themselves and do not necessarily reflect the position of BUST Magazine or its staff.


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