“Free Pussy Riot” as a slogan is approaching meaninglessness-by-repetition, like when you say “banana” so many times in a row that you forget it’s a word. But despite the echo chamber effect of its proliferation, the demand itself hasn’t lost value as a legitimate goal.

Protesters all over the world have shown support for the punk group jailed for criticizing their government and offending the church in the process – two years in prison for singing a song, basically.

But on Wednesday, Prime Minister Dmitri A. Medvedev came out in support of the punk rockers, suggesting that maybe the whole thing had gone too far. The New York Times noted that this is the “most explicit commentary to come from a high-ranking official” since the sentencing on August 17.

The Timesreported:

The six months they have already served, he said in remarks that were shown on television, is “fully enough to make them think about what happened, because of their stupidity or for some other reasons.”

“So prolonging their time in conditions of imprisonment seems not to be productive,” he added.

The Times then quoted Pussy Riot’s lawyer speculating that the government sees that they pushed too hard on such an unpopular cause as throwing the women in prison, and are now trying to find a graceful way to back down.

Medvedev might not have been able to stop himself from slipping a jab into his statement, calling the women “stupid,” but what really matters is that the pressure is getting to the Russian government, and they’re starting to falter in their hard-line stance.

So, I guess we all need to keep chanting, tagging, and writing “Free Pussy Riot” for a little longer until it becomes a reality.

 

Images courtesy of examiner.com, zastavki.com, demotix.com, dancingthroughmonday.blogspot.com, newsdaily.com, sfcitizen.com, according2g.com, backstreet-merch.com and digitaljournal.com

Tagged in: Pussy Riot, New York Times, Medvedev, free pussy riot   

The opinions expressed on the BUST blog are those of the authors themselves and do not necessarily reflect the position of BUST Magazine or its staff.




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