The First Time, written and directed by Jonathan Kasdan (In the Land of Women, Californication), stars Dylan O’Brien (MTV’s Teen Wolf), Britt Robertson, and Victoria Justice (Nickelodeon’s Victorious). The Sundance Film Festival hit is meant to be a more realistic take on a teenage love story, and it does a good job of capturing the awkwardness and stress that a lot of us often experienced as teenagers.  The sweet and earnest Dave (O’Brien) is in love with his oblivious friend Jane (Justice), and as he’s gathering up the courage to admit his feelings, he meets Aubrey (Robertson) at a party and a connection is immediately formed.

 

 

Over the course of a weekend, Dave and Aubrey end up spending more time together doing normal teenage things like going to the movies and alcohol-fueled parties. They talk about their hopes and dreams for the future, and, as so often happens when girl meets boy in a movie, develop feelings for each other. At times, their conversations border on cheesiness, getting super personal and soul-baring too quickly. This is probably due to the fact that the story is laid out within only a few days.

Robertson nails her part as the slightly anxious Aubrey, who can’t wait to get out of high school but is still freaked out about the whole growing-up thing. O’Brien’s excellent comedic timing as well as hilarious quips from his best friend Simon (Craig Roberts) will make you laugh out loud.

The First Time isn’t a groundbreaking film about teenage love, but it’s cute and funny, and may spark good feelings of nostalgia for your high school years, even if you, like Aubrey, couldn’t wait to get out of there.  It opens in select theaters this Friday, October 19.

 

Tagged in: Victoria Justice, The First Time, teenagers, teenage love, sundance, romantic comedies, movies, Jonathan Kasdan, film, Dylan O'Brien, Britt Robertson   

The opinions expressed on the BUST blog are those of the authors themselves and do not necessarily reflect the position of BUST Magazine or its staff.




blog comments powered by Disqus