New Sites Make It Easy To Create Your Own Fab Fabric

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Thanks to a handful of new DIY-fabric companies, you can now take your handmade creations to a whole new level of customization. Are you obsessed with your pet bunny? Reupholster your favorite chair in fabric printed with her likeness. Can’t stand the holiday-inspired textiles at your local craft mart? Create your own neon plaid. The options are endless; all you need is an Internet connection and a little creativity. The following resources let you turn uploaded photos, scanned images, or Photoshop designs into patterned fabric at totally affordable prices in runs as small as one yard. Each site walks you through the process step-by-step, so it’s easy as pie for even the non-tech-savvy. And since the turnaround time is seven business days or less, you’ll be personalizing your projects to the max in no time flat.

The design-it-yourself fabric service offered by Spoonflower (www.spoonflower.com) is already a fave among crafters, probably because of the charm of the site’s interactive community that lets you see what other folks are creating. The prices range from $18 to $32 per yard for prints on all-natural fabrics like organic and upholsteryweight cotton, and Spoonfl ower employs eco-friendly production using pigment dyes. For kicks, check out their weekly fabric design contest, voted on and created by Spoonfl ower users—they even make the winner available for purchase. Looking for a broader spectrum of textiles? Fabric on Demand (www.fabricondemand.com) has an especially user-friendly site and offers more than twice as many fabric choices as Spoonfl ower to print on (including lavish textiles like fl eece and suede) that will cost you $16.75 – $34.20 a yard to customize. If you’re not a sewer, Karma Kraft (www. karmakraft.com) is the company for you. In addition to offering base fabrics from polyester to pure silk at $20 – $32 per yard, for a little extra cash you can have Karma Kraft’s seamsters turn your fabric into a handbag, apparel, and even a pet bed.

 

This article originally appeared in BUST Magazine. Subscribe now!

yardSaleFW

Thanks to a handful of new DIY-fabric companies, you can now take your handmade creations to a whole new level of customization. Are you obsessed with your pet bunny? Reupholster your favorite chair in fabric printed with her likeness. Can’t stand the holiday-inspired textiles at your local craft mart? Create your own neon plaid. The options are endless; all you need is an Internet connection and a little creativity. The following resources let you turn uploaded photos, scanned images, or Photoshop designs into patterned fabric at totally affordable prices in runs as small as one yard. Each site walks you through the process step-by-step, so it’s easy as pie for even the non-tech-savvy. And since the turnaround time is seven business days or less, you’ll be personalizing your projects to the max in no time flat.

The design-it-yourself fabric service offered by Spoonflower (www.spoonflower.com) is already a fave among crafters, probably because of the charm of the site’s interactive community that lets you see what other folks are creating. The prices range from $18 to $32 per yard for prints on all-natural fabrics like organic and upholsteryweight cotton, and Spoonfl ower employs eco-friendly production using pigment dyes. For kicks, check out their weekly fabric design contest, voted on and created by Spoonfl ower users—they even make the winner available for purchase. Looking for a broader spectrum of textiles? Fabric on Demand (www.fabricondemand.com) has an especially user-friendly site and offers more than twice as many fabric choices as Spoonfl ower to print on (including lavish textiles like fl eece and suede) that will cost you $16.75 – $34.20 a yard to customize. If you’re not a sewer, Karma Kraft (www. karmakraft.com) is the company for you. In addition to offering base fabrics from polyester to pure silk at $20 – $32 per yard, for a little extra cash you can have Karma Kraft’s seamsters turn your fabric into a handbag, apparel, and even a pet bed.

 

This article originally appeared in BUST Magazine. Subscribe now!

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Tagged in: Real Life, October/November 2009, from the magazine, Fabric, DIY   

The opinions expressed on the BUST blog are those of the authors themselves and do not necessarily reflect the position of BUST Magazine or its staff.




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