The answer to the question “If women knew how to behave, there would be less rape: agree or disagree?” seems painfully obvious, but in a world dominated in part by victim-blaming and rampant rape culture, a tragic number or global citizens are inclined to select “agree.” A recent survey by the Institute of Applied Economic Research in Brazil revealed that 58.5% percent of those interviewed (both male and female) agreed with the ... Read More
Warning: This post may not be safe for work. A few weeks ago, we featured a powerful group of photographs of a breast cancer survivor bearing her beautiful body as a means of encouraging women (and men!) around the world; sadly, the woman was criticized for her near-nudity, causing her to lose over 100 Facebook friends. As a culture, we are surrounded by images of naked, overtly sexualized women, and yet honest portrayals of brave women battling this illness and ... Read More
Meet Duncan Lou: a beautiful and playful boxer whose gorgeous spirit will stay with you long after you finish reading this post. At 8 weeks old, the miraculous canine lost his two rear legs to amputations after it was discovered that surgery could not repair some damage he’d had since birth. As reported by the amazing Panda Paws Rescue shelter for special needs dogs, Duncan Lou insists on running without his wheelchair, bounding about faster than you can say ... Read More
  For the artist Annette Thas, Barbie is a disturbingly bittersweet symbol of childhood nostalgia and longing; for installation piece “Wave I,” she uses between 3,000 and 5,000 barbie dolls to build a sculptural wave, re-appropriating the doll as a means of translating her earliest memories, scenes which now flood her after returning to Belgium to care for her ill sister.    For the artist, the wave is meant to convey her own ... Read More
  Trigger warning: mildly graphic imagery In a startling critique of the ways in which images of women’s bodies are consumed, the artist Jessica Ledwich presents “The Fanciful, Monstrous Feminine,” a collection of surreal photographs documenting the psychological consequences of contemporary beauty standards and practices. For Ledwich, female sexuality is viewed as “threatening” and is therefore oppressed; here, she ... Read More
  “All kids need to know this message […] you can be great,” explains the photographer Eunique Jones of her project Because Of Them We Can, a series if images in which kids dress up as inspirational figures in African American history and women’s history. The children, in engaging with figures who have achieved great acts of courage and activism, work to challenge prejudices about both race and gender.     Seen here as those ... Read More
  At 2013’s Denver Comic Con, a young lady dared to ask a very important question of Wil Wheaton, star of Star Trek: The Next Generation and The Big Bang Theory: “When you were a kid, were you called a nerd, and if so, how did you deal with it? And his answer was perfect.    Without an ounce of condescension, he addressed to difficult topic with grace and compassion. It’s too rare that we’re reminded that as children and as ... Read More
  During long airport waits, I’ve often wandered to the magazine rack, my eyes pleasantly glazing over at the diverting covers. Many women’s magazines (with obvious exceptions like BUST and Ms.) are meant to distract us, to offer an escape that an be lovely, but is also generally void of any real social or personal significance. What if mainstream women’s mags like Seventeen, Good Housekeeping, and Brides addressed painful topics like sexual ... Read More
Trigger Warning: slightly graphic imagery For the artist Eliza Bennett, her flesh is her medium; in embroidering her palm with thick threads, she hopes to explore the ways in which we view gender roles. Her hand, swollen and bruised by her own careful work, is titled “A Woman’s Work Is Never Done,” and her gruesomely precise handiwork serves to remind the viewer of the strife of women laborers, many of whom are paid far less than their male ... Read More
  When the photographer Julia Kozerski lost literally half her body weight, dropping from 338 to under 178 lbs, she cataloged her complex emotional reaction to her physical transformation in a series titled Half. Unlike most most weight loss media aimed at shaming women for our bodies, the artist avoids the display of any cheerful post-weight-loss confidence, forcing viewers to consider the murky and provocative intersections of body image and ... Read More