Tag » Photography
Daniel Seung Lee. Pink Flamingo, #FC74FD   From Brick Red to Blush, the magic of Crayola crayons lies in their color names. While teaching to children a wide array of color, the utensils also teach us some of our first vocabulary words: I learned what a Flamingo was from a crayon! As we grow up, we can lose the sense of wonder brought on by a fresh box of Crayola crayons; unless we live in Pleasantville, the joy the fact of color often escapes ... Read More
  In Flower Woman, the photographer Eunice Adorno enters the Mennonite community Nuevo Ideal, in Durango, and The Onda Zacatecas, hoping to scratch beneath the surfaces of stereotypes and uncover deeper truths about the women’s lifestyles. The character of the strict and austere Mennonite female is replaced with a more honest and nuanced exploration of female friendships and family.    The images are whimsical, displaying the women sporting ... Read More
  I have loved the photographer Alessandra Sanguinetti from a young age; her poignant renditions of newborn and deceased animals on faraway farms broke my heart, translating something ineffable about growth and mortality. Arguably her most renowned series consists of her portraits of two Argentine girls living in rural Buenos Aires, a project which she stumbled into when they kept interrupting her photographic work on a friend’s ... Read More
“Imagine if someone erased your personality at age twenty. You have to figure out what kind of person you are without the first twenty years.” Ithaca, NY - 2012 Trigger Warning: This post contains descriptions of rape and sexual assault that may be triggering to survivors.  After her close friend was raped in college, the photographer Lydia Billings was devastated by the geographical distance between them, and she confronted her own feelings with ... Read More
  Photoshop is so laughably overused in today’s media that it’s become a rarity to see an image untouched by digital doctoring. Photoshop allows advertisers to construct the modern fantasy face, and beauty product ads entice consumers with absurdly manicured images of the human form. In most cases, we know it’s not the product that makes one’s skin perfectly blemish-free but the digital alterations, yet we are are continuously urged-- ... Read More
  After a recent rape trial divided the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, VA, the English and psychology student Hannah Boes took action to combat the pervasive rape culture that often persists on college campuses. She founded William & Mary Stands With Survivors, an online catalog of photographs “dedicated to showcasing allies who support sexual assault survivors and refuse to perpetuate rape culture, or the attitudes that normalize ... Read More
  The family photo album came into vogue in the 1800s, soon after photography was invented; the relatively quick process was convenient for middle class families who could not afford a painting. This isn’t to say that photography was ubiquitous; on the contrary, most folks could only afford to have one shot within their lifetimes. So unlike families today, who can easily upload thousands of images, Victorian families cherished each and every shot. It ... Read More
Patty Carroll, Red Velvet From Francesca Woodman to Judy Chicago, women artists have long grappled with the idea of the home: are our houses our personal sanctuaries or our monotonous prisons? The photographer Patty Carroll expresses the ambivalent relationship between femininity and the home in her ongoing project “Anonymous Woman,” in which she shoots women, meant to represent everywoman, engulfed in drapes.   Ecru Shade   Some of ... Read More
  We all know that heavily Photoshopped images don’t accurately depict the human form, yet it’s still easy to become lulled into believing that idealized bodies are relatively uniform. Photographic subjects are too often deemed attractive or not, depending on seemingly arbitrary cultural ideologies. We see fine art and the media portray women as familiar hourglasses; men are often pictured with authoritative stances and broad ... Read More
  The photographer Lauren Poor can rarely be contained by the medium of photography; she builds monuments to fairy worlds, and she’s even turned her own apartment into a magical universe all its own. In her recent series Shrines, she examines the intersection of photography and fantasy, reconstructing visions from her own childhood dreams. Through the use of painting, dolls, and costuming, Poor is able to transcend the photographic and enter into a ... Read More