Tag » Women in Film
  For last week’s feature in Elle magazine, Amy Poehler described her ravenous appetite for her craft, revealing her excitement about her new directing and producing gig on Broad City and her upcoming book, which she lovingly refers to as a self-help/memoir hybrid.    For Poehler and women everywhere, this is an exciting time. Her passion for women’s rights and female empowerment shines through her her every move, from her website Amy ... Read More
Attention everyone: the girls are back in town (did they ever leave?). The Brooklyn Academy of Music will be hosting a film series entitled "Vengeance is Hers" from February 7-18. Get ready for this tribute to some of the greatest roles written for women in film history: "From screwball proto-feminism to witchy gothic horror to cerebral auteurist classics, this series gathers some of cinema’s most unforgettable heroines and anti-heroines as they seize ... Read More
  Geena Davis has been increasing awareness on Hollywood sexism for over ten years with her foundation, the Institute on Gender in Media. The research-based institute has commissioned the largest body of information on gender in film and television ever gathered. And recently she took to the Hollywood Reporter's Women In Entertainment Power 100 issue with a guest column on the ways the film industry can improve itself and the world around it, published today ... Read More
  This week the New York Film Academy blog released a study on gender inequality in the film industry, presenting some truly dire statistics about women both in front of and behind the camera. The data is drawn from the top 500 movies of the past five years and comes in the form of a series of infographics that showcase just how unbalanced the industry really is. First there’s the familiar information: women are much more likely than men to be shown ... Read More
  I am so sick of the lame old stereotype “women are more emotional than men.” Aside from being blatantly false, it does damage. Often, women are disrespected in the workplace if we get heated over something important, or we’re told to “stop PMS-ing” if we have a personal drama. I will always remember the Sex and the City episode in which Samantha Jones is berated for being a working woman and cries only when she gets in the ... Read More
  From Scary Movie onwards, Anna Faris has brilliantly subverted female lead movie tropes. In the 2011 The New Yorker piece “Funny Like A Guy,” she express her desire to verge from the Type A, likable and romantic roles offered to so many Hollywood starlets. She craves grit and authenticity: “I’d like to explore Type D, the sloppy ones,” she said.    So it makes sense that Faris’s relationship with Barbie, an ... Read More
  We’ve all noticed the increase in “strong female characters” gracing our silver screens, and while that’s a huge step, it can’t always be called “feminist.” In interviews, Natalie Portman has expressed that although female characters are now more able to be as fast and strong as male action heroes, they often end up being “just a fantasy of a male writer.” I have to admit I see her point; I was super ... Read More
I was a little apprehensive to see Sandra Bullock’s Gravity when it hit theaters two weekends ago. Since I’m prone to panic attacks, I didn’t think it was suitable for me to watch a movie where a woman is stuck in space, but despite my feelings, I was completely blown away by Bullock’s performance. As a scared doctor, who didn’t fully know how to handle her space shuttle’s equipment, Bullock’s character was completely ... Read More
Have you noticed how few female characters there are in recent Disney movies? In an interview with Fanvoice, animation supervisor Lino DiSalvo explains why it’s supposedly super duper hard to make a movie like Frozen that features women: “animating female characters [is] really, really difficult, ’cause they have to go through these range of emotions, but they’re very, very – you have to keep them pretty and they’re very ... Read More
  The young adult novel The Giver is sometimes shelved as science fiction, but author Lois Lowry has never thought of it as such. Since its publication in 1993, the seminal work of literature has been a beacon of truth and emotional realism for young adults.    Lowry’s narrative follows a pubescent boy named James who lives within a futuristic society where prejudice, violence, sexuality, and emotionality have been expelled. James is selected ... Read More
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