Tag » advertising
If there are two things I love, it’s animals and Ellen DeGeneres. Since it’s Ellen’s birthday this week, she decided to break the rules a little bit and share her very special Super Bowl commercial ahead of time. Ellen stars as Goldilocks—Ellilocks, if you will—except instead of searching for porridge, she really wants to groove out to the perfect tune on the app Beats Music. Always the animal lover, Ellen ends up having a blast with ... Read More
  “What is between my legs is not thoroughly who I am. If gender is black and white, I’m grey,” says Ryley Pogensky, a gender queer model participating in Barney’s New York’s new campaign. Pogensky is one of almost twenty transgender and gender queer models featured in the catalog and ad images, shot by the legendary Bruce Weber.    Each model has a story to tell, hailing from communities across the globe. Culturally, ... Read More
The photographer Suzanne Heintz is sick and tired of being told that she needs to marry and have kids. Although she acknowledges the strides made by women in the past decades in her interview with Feature Shoot, she feels now that a new sort of feminine mystique has emerged in the past years; rather than being expected to be perfect housewives, society now demands that women have the family, the career, and the flourishing social life. Amidst pressure to ... Read More
Jillian Mercado, a 26 year-old New York fashion editor living with muscular dystrophy has been cast as one of the young and hip, culturally diverse models that are part of Diesel’s newest campaign ‘We Are Connected.’ Although Mercado says that it was done as a joke, a few months ago she responded to a Diesel casting call looking for young culturally representative models. Not too long after, she was contacted by Diesel requesting more pics. And it’s ... Read More
  “Have you ever seen anything like it?” reads the copy for this 1981 LEGO advertisement. And no, we haven’t; unlike modern marketing campaigns wherein gender lines and norms are all but drawn in the sand, the ad features a young girl simply enjoying her toys.   The image betrays no sign of the contemporary assumption that girls need special products differentiated from boys’ toys through color, shape, or content. As The ... Read More