Tag » art
  Since “selfie” became Oxford English Dictionary’s word of the year, the internet has been abuzz with mediations on the trend’s implication for young women, the group with whom the trend has become most popular. Does the validation of the selfie as a word and as a fixture in modern society hurt or help those who take them?   Flavorwire’s Michelle Dean and Jezebel’s Erin Gloria Ryan view the photographic medium as ... Read More
Jean “I don’t give a damn of what people think of me or the way I dress, I dress for myself because I love style and design and color.” This statement may sound like the devil-may-care attitude of a stylish twenty-something, but this sentiment actually comes from the mouth of Bridget, a seventy-five year old Brit, one of six older women featured in the TV documentary Fabulous Fashionistas, which recently aired on Britain’s UK Channel ... Read More
  From today until March 2nd, we the public have the honor of gazing upon Thomas Kluge’s ginormous portrait of the Danish royal family at Christian VIII’s Palace at Amalienborg before it retires to the Fredensborg Palace to live with the family.    Kluge spent four years on his masterpiece, but it hasn’t been well-received. Because it’s, well, kinda creepy. Prince Christian, the young heir to the throne, stands in the ... Read More
  As children, many of us turn to our toys to navigate our developing identities. Sometimes, our dolls serve as surrogates; we parent them the way we see our children parenting us, and we identify with them. Photography operates similarly: as teens, we might dog-ear or collect magazine images that appeal to our expanding sense of self. Since so many dolls and photographs in mainstream fashion magazines present a grossly limited definition of femininity, it ... Read More
  In Saudi Arabia, images are censored in extreme ways; figures in magazines are drawn over or crossed out. In “Out of Line,” the photographer Jowhara Al-Saud presents a groundbreaking approach to her country’s limits on free expression. Her photographs obscure any personal markers; the faces of her subjects are erased. The images could easily be mistaken for drawings, and this ambiguity only adds to the frightening sense that the viewer ... Read More
Imagine leaving your home and family at age 13 to move by yourself to a country where you don't speak the language or know anyone. "I was devastated," Pimprae Hiranprueck told Slate magazine's David Rosenberg of when her parents sent her from Thailand to attend school in the States. But a few years later when she went to study at the Savannah College of Art and Design, Hiranprueck was able to turn her feelings into a beautifully self-reflexive project. Her senior ... Read More
  If you’ve ever wondered what exactly happened to what to the subject of Edvard Munch’s The Scream, the Korean illustrator Kim Dong-Kyu is happy to inform you: he dropped his iPhone. In “Art x Smart,” the artist updates famous paintings, adding to their subjects the accessories of modern life. Of course the images satirize our dependance upon technology with their inclusion in monumental works of art, but I also like the work because ... Read More
  The artist Addie Wagenknecht is known for her critical examinations of internet culture. In the past, she has staged performance art pieces revealing the appeal of anonymity. She has created internet pages that refuse to load, revealing our urgent need for gratification through imagery. In Brussels’s recent Digital Now exhibit, she uses the internet and technology, tools that she admits are generally controlled by men, to create groundbreaking and ... Read More
In Alabama it's illegal to have an ice cream cone in your pocket at all times   The critic Susan Sontag wrote that photography, like no other medium, has the power to condemn or implicate. Crime scene images evidence wrongdoings; we take photographs as proof of something illicit. In her series I Fought the Law, young photographer Olivia Locher cleverly subverts what we think of when we think of crime and bad behavior.  Scouring the nation for absurd ... Read More
The fashion photographer Tim Walker is known for his work with young ladies like Kate Moss; in his new book, he explores the nature of the photographic eye as it pertains to old age. In The Granny Alphabet, he views “the dying breed of little old ladies who live down the lane” with awe and curiosity.  Inspired by his childhood memories of his own grandmothers, he somehow aims to make sense of both old age and infancy: “children and the ... Read More
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