Tag » art history
At the time of her death in 2009, Vivian Maier was known only as a lifelong nanny and secretive loner. Today, she is hailed as one of the most important photographers of the 20th century. It's a miracle that street photographer Vivian Maier’s remarkable work ever saw the light of day. A career nanny who worked primarily in the affluent suburbs of Chicago for 40 years, starting in the 1950s, Maier took hundreds of thousands of pictures with her ... Read More
  If Holly Andres isn’t on your radar, you’re missing out. Andres is a Portland-based photographer whose work feels akin to the likes of Alfred Hitchcock and Cindy Sherman, but all the more fresh and exciting. Her photographs often explore the tension between an apparently approachable subject matter and a darker, sometimes disturbing subtext. “I’m interested in the cognitive dissonance that can result from employing formal elements such as bright ... Read More
Warning: This post may not be safe for work. A few weeks ago, we featured a powerful group of photographs of a breast cancer survivor bearing her beautiful body as a means of encouraging women (and men!) around the world; sadly, the woman was criticized for her near-nudity, causing her to lose over 100 Facebook friends. As a culture, we are surrounded by images of naked, overtly sexualized women, and yet honest portrayals of brave women battling this illness and ... Read More
  Holy Mother of Blue Ivy, this is genius. Ever find yourself staring into the depths of a gorgeous, iconic painting, only to wonder: "what the hell does this mean?" Unless you've studied works by everyone from Hyacinthe Rigaud to Pierre Puvis de Chavannes (uhh, nope), it can be really hard to puzzle out the messages behind their masterpieces. Queen B knows your pain. Or at least Leigh Silver does - she's carefully curated an impressive collection ... Read More
As much as I love the surrealist movement for dragging my subconscious mind out of its deep slumber, I can't help but feel perturbed that it is an art movement commonly identified with men. Women were often represented in surrealist art as objects of beauty, but a good number of them stepped outside of the frame and made important creative contributions. To illustrate women's involvement in the surrealist movement, Ilene Susan Fort, Tere Arcq, and Terri Geis ... Read More
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