Tag » body positivity
I'm sure you can recall the amazing guerrilla feminism exhibited by the intelligent and witty women of FORCE, the group behind the faux-PINK Victoria's Secret consent line last year, featuring a full campaign around a fake line of panties, donning messages of enthusiastic consent and modeled by racially diverse women of all shapes and sizes. For just a moment, we thought Victoria's Secret joined us in this century, only to realize the panties were ... Read More
“There is no reason to retouch beauty. We think THE REAL YOU IS SEXY.”  So reads the closing line of aerie’s recent letter to young woman, accompanying a campaign advertising its Spring 2014 collection. The lingerie company, affiliated with American Eagle, is giving their target demographic of girls (aged 15-21) an ad campaign free of retouching. Can I get a hallelujah?!  Titled #aerieReal, the campaign attempts to deal with the beauty ... Read More
  A few days ago, the Facebook page Plus Size Modeling asked the social network this question: “Should you companies start making Plus Sized Barbie dolls?” For those in favor, the page offers the “like” button; those against the toy are encouraged to comment. Accompanying the question is a Photoshopped illustration of a potential plus-sized Barbie (one that does not exist), wearing the familiar pink halter dress and sporting ... Read More
  With all the “fit moms” and tabloid attention on “post-baby bodies,” we can lose sight of the fact that our beauty lies in our diversity. The fetishization of the mother with the "perfect body" is discouraging to women of all walks and phases of life, and it’s important to combat this kind of aggressive negativity by celebrating our bodies, minds, and lives. A few months ago, Maria Kang, often called “Fit Mom,” ... Read More
  Photoshop is so laughably overused in today’s media that it’s become a rarity to see an image untouched by digital doctoring. Photoshop allows advertisers to construct the modern fantasy face, and beauty product ads entice consumers with absurdly manicured images of the human form. In most cases, we know it’s not the product that makes one’s skin perfectly blemish-free but the digital alterations, yet we are are continuously urged-- ... Read More
  Barbie’s place in adolescence and constructed femininity has baffled psychologists and feminist alike: on one hand, she’s a patient confidante onto which girls might project their hopes and aspirations. But she also espouses limited and damaging views on female roles, bodies, and sexuality. She sends conflicting messages, passively listening to you for hours while remaining inhumanly cold. As girls, we intuitively pick up that Barbie is ... Read More
  We all know that heavily Photoshopped images don’t accurately depict the human form, yet it’s still easy to become lulled into believing that idealized bodies are relatively uniform. Photographic subjects are too often deemed attractive or not, depending on seemingly arbitrary cultural ideologies. We see fine art and the media portray women as familiar hourglasses; men are often pictured with authoritative stances and broad ... Read More
Chrystal Bougon, the owner of plus-size lingerie store Curvy Girl, is encouraged to see more plus-size models these days, but she thinks it might not be enough. After all, “anything over size 4 is considered plus-size,” she says. And most are photoshopped. She is “constantly asked for pictures of [her] products on 'regular' bodies,” bodies without any airbrushing or editing. In her “Regular Women” campaign, she delivers by ... Read More
  As children, many of us turn to our toys to navigate our developing identities. Sometimes, our dolls serve as surrogates; we parent them the way we see our children parenting us, and we identify with them. Photography operates similarly: as teens, we might dog-ear or collect magazine images that appeal to our expanding sense of self. Since so many dolls and photographs in mainstream fashion magazines present a grossly limited definition of femininity, it ... Read More
Eliezer Álvarez, owner of a small mannequin factory in Valencia, Venezuela, has created the kind of woman he believes the public desires—one with, as the New York Times reports, “a bulging bosom and cantilevered buttocks, a wasp waist and long legs, a fiberglass fantasy, Venezuelan style.” With the introduction of his new mannequins, Álvarez witnessed an incredible surge in sales, and now, these horribly inaccurate portrayals of the ... Read More
<< Start < 1 2 4 > >>