Tag » books
Oh, the woes of the disastrous first date: the silences, the bad smells, the off-putting comments… it's all be enough to make someone lie in bed weeping for days while scrolling the pages of “Forever Alone." Or it could provide excruciatingly exhilarating stories to share with friends, grandchildren, or the entire Internet community! The date may have been shitty, but it sure is fun to laugh about! That's the attitude Rhodri Marsden takes with his ... Read More
She’s 27, she’s Jewish, and she wears Gucci: she’s Mindy Budgor and she’s the first female Maasai warrior in recorded history. For that reason alone, it’s important to read Warrior Princess, but that’s not the only reason. It’s also surprisingly funny; you will LOL a lot, probably very hard. Budgor hails from Chicago and, out of a hazy sense of purpose, was applying for a master’s in business when she heard the ... Read More
Chelsea Clinton is one of the classiest young ladies I can think of. Also, she’s awesome. Not just because she’s a Clinton Foundation leader or a board member for Common Sense Media,  but because she loves a good book—especially one with a strong, intelligent female leading by example.  In her Our Friends’ Favorites segment, she dropped some literary names that made me love her a whole bunch: Ramona Quimby, Meg Murray, Claudia ... Read More
Since childhood, we’ve been taught over and over again – don't judge a book by its cover – but this seemingly golden maxim is getting harder to follow.  Earlier this month, we reported on the unyielding gendering of book covers. The trend is particularly persistent in young adult fiction, where “regular” books are marketed towards both genders, and then there are the books for girls: unabashedly decorated in frills, lace, and ... Read More
The fight for gender equality in fiction lives on. For the past year, gendered book covers and the people fighting against them have highlighted the inner workings of sexism in the publishing biz. Who could forget the outcry over The Bell Jar’s 50th anniversary cover?    By the way, that cover is still featured on Google’s results page for the novel. Thanks for listening, publishers. And what about author Jim Hines’ genius photo ... Read More
Following her debut novel, The City is a Rising Tide, Rebecca Lee presents a collection of seven biting stories about the luxury we take in life’s ordinary comforts, and the threats, real or imagined, that lurk beyond the surface. As of this writing, Bobcat was longlisted for the international Frank O’Connor Prize for story collections, and the praise is due: with deadpan humor, Lee’s light touch illuminates the contrasts in everyday ... Read More
Marilyn in the white dress over the subway vent. Marilyn singing a breathless happy birthday to JFK. Marilyn in hot pink full-length gloves, proclaiming that diamonds are a girl’s best friend. Theses images of Marilyn Monroe have become iconic in their own right, and depictions of her have been reprised time and again in media, from movies (My Week with Marilyn) to music (her own verse in Elton John’s “Candle in the Wind”) to television (Megan Hilty, ... Read More
An intimate look at a group of professionals creating something they felt proud of (as well as a survey of the changing landscape of American entertainment and culture in the early 1970s), this comprehensive history of The Mary Tyler Moore Show is as enjoyable as reruns of the classic show. Originally pitched as a show about a divorced career woman, and forcibly revised to feature a never-married protagonist, the show launched at a time when the one female ... Read More
 Alida Nugent, of The Frenemy blog fame, has brought her witty snark to the literary world with this debut. The book—a collection of short essays on 20-something life—has fine writing and some genuinely funny lines, but I was initially put off by the subject matter. Nugent spends a lot of time bragging about failed attempts at maturity, seems to revel in her emotional and financial instability, and spends too many pages discussing how best to ... Read More
Virgin Soul is the fictional memoir of Geniece> Hightower, an aspiring journalist undergoing a journey of self-discovery during the Black Power movement in 1960s San Francisco. Divided into four sections, each dedicated to a year of her university schooling, the novel follows Geniece’s transition from focused scholar to revolutionary panther. While researching a story for her college newspaper, she meets Allwood, a highly intellectual activist who pulls ... Read More
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