Tag » books
We’ve got quite a few important anniversaries to acknowledge this year. Fleetwood Mac’s album Rumours is 30 years old! Roe v. Wade is forty! And ringing in the big 5-0 this year is The Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan’s 1963 Magnum Opus. To commemorate this occasion, the New School is hosting React: The Feminine Mystique at 50, a two-day symposium and exhibition featuring some of today's most well-known and respected feminist activists and ... Read More
We have some very good news this week.  Following in the footsteps of prolific funny women like Chelsea Handler, Amy Sedaris, and Tina Fey, Amy Poehler is writing a book. Yes, you heard that right—Amy Poehler is writing a book!  Well, it’s about damn time! According to the AP, the as-of-now untitled book will be out in 2014, and will be published by It Books, a pop culture imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.  It is “inspired in ... Read More
  Have you ever woken from a dream that was so tangible, the damn thing haunted you for months after? If not, read Kiki Petrosino’s Fort Red Border (Sarabande Books) instead. Her debut collection is, for the most part, comprised of poems about a fantasized affair with actor Robert Redford and all the psychic turmoil that comes with it. Even though the book’s title is an anagram for Redford’s name, these poems aren’t just imaginative ... Read More
 Charming. Candid. Compelling. All of these words describe Beth Ditto—and all of them equally sum up her new memoir. Chronicling Ditto’s rise to international fame, the book starts with her humble beginnings in her conservative, tiny Arkansas hometown. While struggling to survive amidst crippling poverty, young Ditto endures sexual abuse early at the hands of a family friend, and learns that this has been the norm for many of her family members. ... Read More
It's rare that a craft book seeks crowd funding in order to go ahead, but this is just the case with the Craftivist Collective's Little Book Of Craftivism.  Brit founder Sarah Corbett, who started out blogging as A Lonely Craftivist (and self professed burnt out activist), has captured U.K. press attention and grown a worldwide group of like-minded crafters passionate about ending equality via the power of craft.  With the blessing of crafty ... Read More
Born in Nigeria and raised in England, Noo Saro-Wiwa avoided visiting her native country after her father, a prominent political activist, was killed there for speaking out against government corruption. Years later, Saro-Wiwa, a travel writer, decided to return to Nigeria and explore her love-hate relationship with her homeland. Her journey both reinforces and calls into question her ethnic identity: a visit to her home village means that she is in the one place ... Read More
Artist and designer Mike Perry opted to celebrate the release of his monograph Wondering Around Wandering in a non-traditional way: instead of a standard launch party, Perry created a pop-up exhibition of the same name in his Brooklyn neighborhood. The warehouse-turned-gallery eventually gained a new use as a community art space, playing host to pumpkin-painting parties, school groups, art workshops, and performances.As with all good things, Wondering Around ... Read More
The reference to “six granddaughters” in the title of this dark, complex novel is deceiving: two are dead. One dies as an infant and pulls a shroud of everlasting grief over the family, and the other narrates the entire novel from beyond the grave while she floats in an afterlife. At the heart of the novel is Cecilia, a beautiful poet who is perceived as being the most talented and attractive among the granddaughters. Nonetheless, she is plagued by ... Read More
This is the story of a Palestinian family in Gaza coping with the hell of living in a warzone. The book is informative, exciting, and thorough—all you have to do is get through the first 60 cumbersome pages, and then the story flies along until the end. Dabbagh’s main characters are 27-year-old Iman and her twin brother Rashid, and their story opens with a bombing raid. While Rashid is hanging out on his roof, stoned out of his mind and welcoming ... Read More
In Marbles, cartoonist Ellen Forney’s life-altering journey though mental illness is graphically exposed in more ways than one. The Forney we see at the start of the story is experiencing her most sexual, creative, and manic period, which is followed by a big crash that leads to her bipolar diagnosis at 30. Here, her story evolves into the struggle not only to come to terms with medicating herself, but also to find the right formula of medications that will ... Read More
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