Tag » family
  When we think about motherhood and photography, we think of “post-baby bodies” and the tabloid-front image of a glamorous women cradling her shiny-clean newborn bundle. Even in progressive contemporary society, various media present the mother as glamorous, perfect, and inhumanly flawless.     In her stunning series Portrait of The Mother, the photographer Joy Christiansen Erb provides an alternate vision of motherhood. Shooting ... Read More
Like many parents, the photographer Emer Gillespie loves photographing her daughter, cataloging her family’s growth through a family photo album. Her daughter, 11-year-old Laoisha, who happens to have Downs Syndrome, took an active interest in her mother’s ritual of peering through her lens at a pair of shoes, an open field, the bedroom. While many family photos include posed children staring at an authoritative parent behind the camera, ... Read More
  In Barbie Birth, the maternity photographer Katie Moore invites us into a private moment in the life of the iconic doll: the birth of her child. Following the plastic princess from the moment she goes into labor to her first breastfeeding session, the photographs read like an eerily polished family photo album. Ken and Nurse Barbie aid the birthing doll as she goes through her home birthing process; all three never break their ... Read More
  In the late 1880s, Kodak released the box camera, the first camera available to the masses. Prior to its release, cameras were typically popular amongst trained scientists and artists, but the box introduced the ease of the snapshot; its tagline read, “You Press The Button, We Do The Rest.” Families who might not have been able to afford painted portraits could capture memories in film; the Kodak moment was born.     For $25, ... Read More
  The photographer Amy Powell was 20-years-old when her half-sister Erica was born; she photographed her mother as she gave birth, and she cut Erica’s umbilical cord with her own hands. In her series Erica & I, Powell examines her much-younger sister for traces of her own girlhood memories.     In the moving series, she lays out the puzzling and quiet moments of growth that are so often excluded from the family photo album. In one ... Read More
  An empty home bears the weight of both loss and rebirth: it offers a strange sort of tabula rasa that is never completely blank, that carries memories that cannot be erased. My fiance and I moved into our first apartment just a few months ago, and we have spread all of our trinkets and memories amongst the mysterious evidence of residents past: an old air shower caddy, a large stain circling the dining room.    The subjective beauty of our own ... Read More
  The family photo album came into vogue in the 1800s, soon after photography was invented; the relatively quick process was convenient for middle class families who could not afford a painting. This isn’t to say that photography was ubiquitous; on the contrary, most folks could only afford to have one shot within their lifetimes. So unlike families today, who can easily upload thousands of images, Victorian families cherished each and every shot. It ... Read More
Despite constant reassurances regarding my "biological clock," I've never considered having kids of my own. That isn't to say I'm repulsed by children--Rather, my child-rearing dreams have always revolved around the prospect of taking my nieces and nephews to Legoland. Or prom dress shopping. Or ice-cream eating. Essentially, I'd love to hang out with youths who are related to me, as long as I can spoil them unconditionally and don't have to remember what time ... Read More
Imagine leaving your home and family at age 13 to move by yourself to a country where you don't speak the language or know anyone. "I was devastated," Pimprae Hiranprueck told Slate magazine's David Rosenberg of when her parents sent her from Thailand to attend school in the States. But a few years later when she went to study at the Savannah College of Art and Design, Hiranprueck was able to turn her feelings into a beautifully self-reflexive project.Her senior ... Read More
The always incredible David Sedaris recently wrote an essay for The New Yorker that recalls a family trip to the beach following the suicide of his sister, Tiffany. Though the piece reflects on loss, and its subsequent effect on the Sedaris family, it is also filled with childhood nostalgia, and, ultimately, a sense of hopefulness.   Sedaris's signature humor is omnipresent as he recollects the oft-laughable, but sometimes somber family dynamics both prior to ... Read More
<< < 2 4 > End >>