Tag » feminism
Rookie seems to do no wrong, and the release of their new grrrl power anthem "Go Forth, Feminist Warriors" is a perfect example of their flawlessness.  Jessica Hopper, Rookie's music editor, hatched the idea for a feminist version of "We Are the World" in the same place she gets most of her inspiration; the shower. Armed with the killer idea, she enlisted the help of Katy Davidson and Marianna Ritchey from the song writing duo Lloyd & Michael. Sarah ... Read More
Makeup is part of the daily routine of countless women (and a few good men). Why women wear makeup is a complicated question, that often comes down to arguments of alleged and arguably false agency - paralleled in conversations about the choice to shave one's legs/armpits - complicated of course by societal beauty standards that put an immense amount of pressure on women's appearances, emphasizing the necessity to be as soft, supple, and attractive as money can ... Read More
Intersections is an impossibly ornate installation by artist Anila Quayyum Agha, that uses laser-cut wood to throw whimsical and incredibly detailed patterns onto gallery walls and floors. Agha was born in Pakistan, attended the University of North Texas in and is decorated with many accolades, including the Creative Renewal Fellowship, awarded by the Indianapolis Arts Council.  From the artist: "With this large scale patterned wood project I explored ... Read More
Ethan Fixell of MTV's Guy-Code won himself a little flack last Wednesday when he published an article decrying the typical lack of hot chicks at metal concerts. The piece, somewhat obtusely titled “Why Are There So Many Cute Girls at Metal & Hardcore Concerts Now?” challenges its readers with funny, true remarks like “Death metal events are known to be...how do I put this...'vaginally challenged.'” ...yup. But Mr. Fixell is also pretty good at ... Read More
The old-as-time question of the feminist killjoy: Should I be enjoying this? I’ve found the answer is, typically, not really. Unless of course it’s 30 Rock, or Wanda Sykes standup. Girl Code is the MTV show that echoes VH1’s I Love the 80’s/90's in set-up and production. The show provides a litany of interview sound bytes from a variety of funny women, and a couple of dudes for “the male perspective.” *eye roll* What can be ... Read More
Praise the App Gods. The incredible ass-kicking team behind Miss Representation has given us yet another gem. #NotBuyingIt is an app dedicated to calling out sexist representation, and celebrating media that empowers women and girls.  *downloads immediately* The app reads like an Instagram/Twitter hybrid. As you scroll through your #NotBuyingIt timeline, you read short posts from other righteous feminists calling out some horrible stuff, and you ... Read More
"I am tired of sexually tinted images" reads an angrily scribbled message on a half-ripped billboard. Well, so are many of us. Billboards and posters all over the streets are beacons of sexist merchandizing, objectifying women's bodies as things to be had. Often faceless, topless, and pants-less, images of overly-sexualized women litter the streets as a way to sell, well, anything - including liquor, cigarettes, and beer. This is not a new topic, and there's ... Read More
Chances are, this is not your first day here, but Kid President's welcome to people just entering the world is a reminder of what it means to actually be here.  "You're made from love, to be love, to spread love. Love is always louder, no matter what! Even if hate has a bullhorn, love is louder! So let your life be louder! Let's shout to the world: THINGS COULD BE BETTER! IT'S OKAY ABOUT THE MESS-UP'S!" I may or may not have cried some happy tears. Kid ... Read More
  Jennifer Simpkins of The Tab London has written a savvy, brave piece about the dark underbelly of fourth-wave feminism – or, really, any loud group of opinionated people with internet access. In her estimate, feminists can counterintuitively tend to victimize other women by being excessively quick to admonish or dismiss; take the author's description of the time she tentatively endorsed Robin Thicke's “Blurred Lines” on social media. Worth ... Read More
When performance artist Laurie Anderson's Empty Spaces first came to New York in 1989 (as part of the Next Wave Festival at the Brooklyn Academy of Music), The New York Times hailed the artist's latest piece as “a work that, above all, evokes an American sense of loneliness, of cowboys calling through wide open spaces.” Ever shrewd, ever stylish, Anderson's collaged show contained anecdotes, lilting ballads, and cultural criticism. Dangerous Minds ... Read More
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