Tag » love
  The glorious lady photographer Elena Shulimova lives on a farm, where she and her sons care for and frolic with dogs, cats, bunnies, and even ducklings. In the vein of other starkly maternal photography like that of the renowned (and controversial) Sally Mann, Shulimova lovingly and expertly captures the innocence and experimentation of childhood within the context of the natural world.     Without a hint of condescension or sentimentality, ... Read More
  After someone dies, their image and defining characteristics take on new meaning. The first image I recall when I think of my grandmother is often her hand; I imagine it jumping across the pages of fairy tales she read to me, and sometimes I even slip on her opal ring and imagine myself as her, acting out the rhythmic motions. The idea that part of her continues to live within me is as comforting as it is unsettling; although we longer take Victorian-style ... Read More
  There’s Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman Hughes, Catharine MacKinnon and Andrea Dworkin. There’s Debbie Stoller and Laurie Henzel. Add to your list of beautiful female friendships that overcame adversity Ruth and Idgie, named after the protagonists of the film Fried Green Tomatoes. Idgie is a caramel-hued dachshund; Ruth is a golden-eyed kitty.    They have have faced more than their fair ... Read More
  An empty home bears the weight of both loss and rebirth: it offers a strange sort of tabula rasa that is never completely blank, that carries memories that cannot be erased. My fiance and I moved into our first apartment just a few months ago, and we have spread all of our trinkets and memories amongst the mysterious evidence of residents past: an old air shower caddy, a large stain circling the dining room.    The subjective beauty of our own ... Read More
  The student artists Ayako Kanda and Mayuka Hayashi of Musashino Art University in Japan recently unveiled a gorgeous series of portraits of X-Ray and CT images of embracing couples. One might expect images devoid of flesh, readable facial expressions, and color to read as clinical and sterile, but the photographs are strikingly human: “X-ray images usually show the finite nature of our bodies composed only of matter. But these couples’ portraits ... Read More