Tag » movie review
Daniele Mazet-Delpeuch was contentedly living in provincial France, cooking simple meals for a small restaurant, when her life took a turn that landed her as French President François Mitterand’s personal chef. It’s a Cinderella story where all the boring parts have been replaced with food—what could be better? Well, a few things apparently. The film Haute Cuisine, directed by Christian Vincent, aims to capture Ms. Delpeuch’s journey ... Read More
I’m no beer aficionado, but I found Drinking Buddies to be like a cold, clear drink of artisanal beer - savory with rich, emphasized notes while also sparkling with subtlety. In writer/director Joe Swanberg's film, perhaps the allusion is intentional - Drinking Buddies features two - you guessed it - drinking buddies who are coworkers at a craft brewery in Chicago, who negotiate their feelings for each other while in relationships with other ... Read More
Director Sebastián Silva, best known for his film The Maid, has created the next manic pixie dream girl (MPDG) film. If you’re not familiar with the manic pixie dream girl trope, watch Feminist Frequency’s video. In short, the MPDG is a female character whose sole purpose is to teach an uptight male protagonist to let loose and enjoy life. Beyond that purpose, however, the MPDG seems to have no life of her own. Often the audience knows nothing ... Read More
I’ve been a sucker for soul band creation tales ever since The Commitments wailed its way into my heart, so I was already predisposed to love The Sapphires. The film, by director Wayne Blair, tells the very-close-to-true story of four young Australian Aboriginal women with killer pipes and big dreams. Sisters Gail (Deborah Mailman), Julie (Jessica Mauboy), and Cynthia (Miranda Tapsell) were raised on a reserve, and grew up singing country hits together. When ... Read More
Rebecca Thomas’s debut feature Electrick Children is a crackling, captivating film that’s equal parts allegory and acid trip. At the center of the story is Rachel (Julia Garner), an inquisitive and rebellious teenager living in the mid-nineties. Julia has been raised by a fundamentalist Mormon family, living on a compound in Utah. On the occasion of her fifteenth birthday, Rachel is asked by her father and church leader (Billy Zane) to begin recording ... Read More
It’s the perfect time for Jack Kerouac’s iconic autobio- graphical novel On the Road to come to the big screen, despite skepticism that this singular staple of beat liter- ature has finally been sold out. Today we find ourselves in an era of uncertain futures populated by emasculated, cigarette-smoking young men with thick-framed glasses and the women who love them—not unlike the late ’40s. Screenwriter Jose Rivera’s script is still ... Read More
From the opening sequence of cutesy doodles set to Wilco’s “Heavy Metal Drummer,” it’s clear that Save the Date is a certain genre of rom com: the indie rom-com dramedy. Think 500 Days of Summer, Juno, Garden State, or anything Michael Cera has been in. I usually love these movies, but I didn't love Save the Date. Despite its indie soundtrack, likeable stars, and an adorable cat, Save the Date is never anything more than mediocre. Most of ... Read More
Things are not good for Sweetness O’Hara. A shy, studious girl in a rough neighborhood, Sweetness (the captivating Zöe Kravitz) is bullied at school and alternately abused and ignored by her alcoholic father and mentally ill mother. When she finally hits her breaking point, things get even worse—if you can believe it. Director Victoria Mahoney has cast a talented ensemble, featuring Precious star Gabourey Sidibe, Tim Blake Nelson (O Brother, Where ... Read More
When I grow up, I want to be Estelle Craig.   Estelle “Stella” Craig is 95 and one of the most fascinating women I’ve come across in a long time. She is the subject of a documentary aptly titled STELLA IS 95, directed by her daughter, Robin Baker Leacock. The film follows her around in her daily activities in her Toronto retirement community and allows her to candidly talk about her life as an event planner, writer, and community ... Read More
  It’s hard to pin down a woman with a gun (in more ways than one). Cathryne Czubek’s new documentary, A Girl and a Gun, takes on the historically complex relationship between American women and firearms—and the portrait that emerges may surprise those who expect another Bowling for Columbine. Czubek captures some shockingly incongruous images—the mom with a baby in one arm and a shotgun in the other, the Tai Chi instructor proudly ... Read More
<< < 2 4 > End >>