Tag » social norms
  Meet the installation artist’s Lucy Glendinning’s “Feather Child:” a downey hybrid, the bird/human rests quietly in fetal position, moving only slightly in her sleep. With this offering, Glendinning asks viewers if “we [will] be able to resist” the potential to genetically enhance our human experiences. Inspired by the Greek myth of Icarus, she imagines future humans treating our DNA as a medium of expression and ... Read More
  Fans of Dana Scully, unite! This is big news, everyone: our favorite X-Files star, the amazing Gillian Anderson, is co-authoring a trilogy of science fiction novels with writer Jeff Rovin titled EarthEnd. Their first book, A Vision of Fire, is slated to appear in print and on e-book devices everywhere in October, thanks to Simon & Schuster’s new sci-fi imprint Simon451. We can’t wait to see what Scully— er, Anderson— dreams ... Read More
  There’s nothing like a lion: they’re majestic, gorgeous, and fiercely intelligent animals. Hyenas, too, are wise, complex, and deeply thoughtful creatures. Both species display amazing capacities for love and gentleness, yet they are pegged as predators; the sad truth is that humans have all but destroyed the earth’s beautiful wildlife. In the next twenty years, lions could be extinct, their African plains destroyed by human ... Read More
  WSJ contributor James Taranto has finally cracked the case of absentee fathers, much to the joy of single women and fatherless children everywhere. Just kidding. Fair warning: you might want to find yourself a helmet before you finish reading this post, because Taranto's conclusions will most likely have you beating your head against the nearest brick wall. In a recent critique of fellow contributor Kay Hymowitz, Taranto claims that the reason so many kids ... Read More
  "Ugly has never looked so beautiful" is a phrase that comes to mind when looking at Jessica Stoller's ceramic sculptures.  Feminine yet abrasive, this series looks at the female experience through a grotesque lens.  I always believed that nothing was more horrific and weird than being a girl.  Stoller's works of art purposefully focus on the underlying paradox of femininity, which in one hand is all about pink and ruffles and "prettiness" yet ... Read More