Tag » women in science
On a day-to-day basis, my feelings towards science are complicated at best. As a biology major in college, I’m in constant duress – by science’s unforgiving long hours, its strenuous lab reports, its difficult tests, its high standards. As a member of the general public, however, I can’t ignore science’s unfailing neglect of female scholars; studies show that prestigious scientific honors are awarded to males more than 95% of the time ... Read More
When I was in junior high school, I went to a “Women in Science” event at the local university. I learned about solar panels (awesome), and I got to feed a deadly centipede from South America through a tube (creepy and awesome). It was great to be exposed to women working in science, because it made me feel like I could do it too. Sadly, these types of programs are few and far between. The gender gap in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) ... Read More
We wrote about the European Commission’s epic fail of a video campaign to promote women in science back in June. Their video’s slogan, “Science: it’s a girl thing!” was accompanied by just enough makeup, nail polish, and cliché girly images to trigger your gag reflex. If you’re brave enough, you can watch it below.After the disastrous (and completely warranted) response of every logical being on the planet, they ... Read More
A study by Yale scientists has shown that academic scientists are, on average, biased against women. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), tested scientists’ reactions to men and women with exactly equal qualifications. In the study, academic scientists — both men and women — were given an application from a student applying for a lab manager position. The applications were all identical, but some had ... Read More
  Vanderbilt psychologists have recently found that women are better than men at recognizing living things, and men are better than women at recognizing vehicles. The psychologists didn’t set out to study sex differences: the discovery was the surprising result of an analysis of a series of visual recognition tasks collected in the process of developing a new standard test for expertise in object recognition.    Researchers had 227 subjects ... Read More
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