Tag » writing
  From Mrs. Dalloway to To The Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf’s stories of human connection, empathy, and love span immeasurable distances of time, space, and circumstance; in their most resonant moments, her words make the complexities of our individual minds seem a little less isolating. To my utter delight, Brain Pickings’s Maria recently Popova recently offered the internet this glimpse into the emotional and intellectual realm of a ... Read More
  Happy Hallow's Eve's Eve, BUSTies! As another year comes to a close we don our carefully crafted outfits and munch on yummy candy, new controversies erupt over what costumes are socially acceptable or too revealing. And a lot of times, these conversations revolve around what women are entitled to wear. So before you head out tomorrow, take a listen to this awesome slam poetry from Washington D.C’s Brave New Voices Grand Slam Finals 2013. Because ... Read More
The always incredible David Sedaris recently wrote an essay for The New Yorker that recalls a family trip to the beach following the suicide of his sister, Tiffany. Though the piece reflects on loss, and its subsequent effect on the Sedaris family, it is also filled with childhood nostalgia, and, ultimately, a sense of hopefulness.   Sedaris's signature humor is omnipresent as he recollects the oft-laughable, but sometimes somber family dynamics both prior to ... Read More
Ahh Wikipedia...truly my oldest and most treasured childhood friend. Without ye, so many A- papers would be mere C+’s...So many useless facts would remain unknown...Truly a bleak world would exist if not for Wikipedia. Yet, statistics show that less than 15% of Wikipedia contributors are female. Could it be that my heart and soul has been devoted the most patriarchal website of them all?! Say it ain’t so! The debate on why such a huge gender gap exists ... Read More
Amy Poehler, the world’s most fabulously awesome human being x1000, wrote a wonderfully thoughtful piece for The New Yorker about her experience as a 17-year old working at an ice cream parlor. The essay, which takes place in 1989—the summer before Poehler’s first year at Boston College—details the tribulations of working in the restaurant business, and explores a familiar topic: adolescent unease about the future. Recalling her ... Read More
<< < 2 4 > End >>