Category » Artsy
  In many ways, photography has always been about voyeurism, about examining a subject with or without their consent. The internet magnifies our desire to peer into each other’s windows, and photographers are catching on. Doug Rickard and others have used Google Maps to survey the world. The content on the internet is open for consumption as soon as it gets put out there, and the photo collage artist Julia Geiser takes full advantage the ... Read More
  As children, many of us turn to our toys to navigate our developing identities. Sometimes, our dolls serve as surrogates; we parent them the way we see our children parenting us, and we identify with them. Photography operates similarly: as teens, we might dog-ear or collect magazine images that appeal to our expanding sense of self. Since so many dolls and photographs in mainstream fashion magazines present a grossly limited definition of femininity, it ... Read More
  In Saudi Arabia, images are censored in extreme ways; figures in magazines are drawn over or crossed out. In “Out of Line,” the photographer Jowhara Al-Saud presents a groundbreaking approach to her country’s limits on free expression. Her photographs obscure any personal markers; the faces of her subjects are erased. The images could easily be mistaken for drawings, and this ambiguity only adds to the frightening sense that the viewer ... Read More
Imagine leaving your home and family at age 13 to move by yourself to a country where you don't speak the language or know anyone. "I was devastated," Pimprae Hiranprueck told Slate magazine's David Rosenberg of when her parents sent her from Thailand to attend school in the States. But a few years later when she went to study at the Savannah College of Art and Design, Hiranprueck was able to turn her feelings into a beautifully self-reflexive project. Her senior ... Read More
  National Geographic’s photographers are in a league of their own; the senior photo editor Elizabeth Krist explains that “resilience and courage” are paramount as she and her colleagues regularly send photojournalists into tough terrain for an average of eight weeks. The road hasn’t been easy for women, and of the fifty or so staff photographers to have served the society in the past century and a quarter, only four are ... Read More
  While searching for a temp job, the artist Coco Layne shaved the sides of her head. Soon after, she got an interview with a conservative clothing company. She wore a wig to conceal her unusual hairstyle. To fit in at work, she parted her hair in a more “feminine” way, covering the shaved areas of her head; she wore makeup.    She documented the transition in her gender presentation on film. In the series, called Warpaint, she hopes to ... Read More
  If you’ve ever wondered what exactly happened to what to the subject of Edvard Munch’s The Scream, the Korean illustrator Kim Dong-Kyu is happy to inform you: he dropped his iPhone. In “Art x Smart,” the artist updates famous paintings, adding to their subjects the accessories of modern life. Of course the images satirize our dependance upon technology with their inclusion in monumental works of art, but I also like the work because ... Read More
  The artist Addie Wagenknecht is known for her critical examinations of internet culture. In the past, she has staged performance art pieces revealing the appeal of anonymity. She has created internet pages that refuse to load, revealing our urgent need for gratification through imagery. In Brussels’s recent Digital Now exhibit, she uses the internet and technology, tools that she admits are generally controlled by men, to create groundbreaking and ... Read More
In Alabama it's illegal to have an ice cream cone in your pocket at all times   The critic Susan Sontag wrote that photography, like no other medium, has the power to condemn or implicate. Crime scene images evidence wrongdoings; we take photographs as proof of something illicit. In her series I Fought the Law, young photographer Olivia Locher cleverly subverts what we think of when we think of crime and bad behavior.  Scouring the nation for absurd ... Read More
The fashion photographer Tim Walker is known for his work with young ladies like Kate Moss; in his new book, he explores the nature of the photographic eye as it pertains to old age. In The Granny Alphabet, he views “the dying breed of little old ladies who live down the lane” with awe and curiosity.  Inspired by his childhood memories of his own grandmothers, he somehow aims to make sense of both old age and infancy: “children and the ... Read More
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