Category » Artsy
Popcorn Venus, 2012. Joyce II.When you think of women photographers who work in self-portraiture, you probably think of Cindy Sherman. The artist has made a career of transforming herself into everything from a bleached blonde spray-tanned socialite to Mae West. Her impressive body of work is such that she appears to be everywhere, capable of metamorphosing into anyone she chooses.    It’s almost impossible to work in self portraiture without ... Read More
  My grandmother was an artist, and throughout her career, she’d make abstract sculptures and embroidery that I’d stare at for hours as a child: “oh, that looks like a face, and that there? That’s an animal.” Our play was art-making, and I was always amazed at how different her aesthetic would become when she was with me. Her paper dolls weren’t abstract at all; I’d make an abstract shape, and she’d magically ... Read More
  The Greek photographer Penelope Koliopoulou is tired of seeing romantic comedies that end as soon as the main couple gets together. From her yearning for more complex representations of intimacy, she created Self Portraits, a series of staged narratives in which she plays both the male and the female involved in a heterosexual relationship.     Her initial impulse was to explore film stills in a way I imagine would be much like the work of ... Read More
  From today until March 2nd, we the public have the honor of gazing upon Thomas Kluge’s ginormous portrait of the Danish royal family at Christian VIII’s Palace at Amalienborg before it retires to the Fredensborg Palace to live with the family.    Kluge spent four years on his masterpiece, but it hasn’t been well-received. Because it’s, well, kinda creepy. Prince Christian, the young heir to the throne, stands in the ... Read More
  In many ways, photography has always been about voyeurism, about examining a subject with or without their consent. The internet magnifies our desire to peer into each other’s windows, and photographers are catching on. Doug Rickard and others have used Google Maps to survey the world. The content on the internet is open for consumption as soon as it gets put out there, and the photo collage artist Julia Geiser takes full advantage the ... Read More
  As children, many of us turn to our toys to navigate our developing identities. Sometimes, our dolls serve as surrogates; we parent them the way we see our children parenting us, and we identify with them. Photography operates similarly: as teens, we might dog-ear or collect magazine images that appeal to our expanding sense of self. Since so many dolls and photographs in mainstream fashion magazines present a grossly limited definition of femininity, it ... Read More
  In Saudi Arabia, images are censored in extreme ways; figures in magazines are drawn over or crossed out. In “Out of Line,” the photographer Jowhara Al-Saud presents a groundbreaking approach to her country’s limits on free expression. Her photographs obscure any personal markers; the faces of her subjects are erased. The images could easily be mistaken for drawings, and this ambiguity only adds to the frightening sense that the viewer ... Read More
Imagine leaving your home and family at age 13 to move by yourself to a country where you don't speak the language or know anyone. "I was devastated," Pimprae Hiranprueck told Slate magazine's David Rosenberg of when her parents sent her from Thailand to attend school in the States. But a few years later when she went to study at the Savannah College of Art and Design, Hiranprueck was able to turn her feelings into a beautifully self-reflexive project.Her senior ... Read More
  National Geographic’s photographers are in a league of their own; the senior photo editor Elizabeth Krist explains that “resilience and courage” are paramount as she and her colleagues regularly send photojournalists into tough terrain for an average of eight weeks. The road hasn’t been easy for women, and of the fifty or so staff photographers to have served the society in the past century and a quarter, only four are ... Read More
  While searching for a temp job, the artist Coco Layne shaved the sides of her head. Soon after, she got an interview with a conservative clothing company. She wore a wig to conceal her unusual hairstyle. To fit in at work, she parted her hair in a more “feminine” way, covering the shaved areas of her head; she wore makeup.    She documented the transition in her gender presentation on film. In the series, called Warpaint, she hopes to ... Read More
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