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> A Gender Agenda
leolgn
post Sep 16 2014, 12:10 AM
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GOOD idea!!!i will try bleach
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leolgn
post Sep 15 2014, 12:47 AM
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I'm pretty sickened by the glaring lack of prominently discussed women in history. It seems that if you want to learn about more prominent women who make/made big contributions, you have to look in the present. Today my Cell Bio instructor mentioned who the Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and in Medicine went to. In Chemistry, there were two men and one woman, and in Medicine, there were either 3 women, or 2 women and 1 man. I'm delighted to see these things, because it's proof against the naysayers that women are every bit as capable as men are in the scientific fields.
I always spend my free time to watching animes or playing games, like bleach online from GoGames.
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BruceLear
post Aug 27 2014, 11:09 PM
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QUOTE(BruceLear @ Aug 26 2014, 01:33 AM) *
nice thread! this may or may not be totally coherent b/c i may or may not be more than half a sleep right now, but here goes. gender is totally a cultural thing. activities and preferences that are associated with being masculine or feminine arbitrary. things that are considered "masculine" or "feminine" can change over time, or be assigned to different gender categories by different cultural groups.

the simplest example i can think of here is the "pink is for girls, blue is for boys" convention. there's no reason why a person should have innate attraction to these colors based on their sex. children are rewarded positively for modeling "gender appropriate" behavior and so often comply with convention. even children of gender neutral parents will receive positive feedback for modeling gendered behavior at school and around friends.

the "pink/blue" dichotomy did not emerge until the mid 20th century. before then powdered blue was the color for little girls and red was the color for little boys! pretty much the opposite as it is now. you can see this in early disney heroines like alice & sleeping beauty with their powder blue gowns.

i'm fascinated (and dismayed!) by the extent commercial enterprise now informs our personal concepts of gender. i think there may have been more rationality to gender concepts in the past, but now with television & mass media, people over wide distances can see the same definition of gender roles.

when it first hit the market, marlboro was a brand marketed as feminine & for women. later the company took a U-turn and decided to market their product at men creating the familiar marlboro man/cowboy killer imagery. there's NO reason why a ecig called
itaste vtr should be feminine or masculine, but the campaign worked, resurrected a fading company, and created a lasting image of a "masculine" product.

jsmith, you mentioned a continuum of gender. have you ever read about alfred kinsey?

also, this american life produced a fascinating show where they interview two transgender children and their parents. it's fascinating to hear the children describe struggling with gender-identity at such a young age, as well as how their communities and parents react.

so, sorry for being a gigantic nerd. smile.gif i love this topic & really did pare down what i had to say.
Well I think you have defined it in better manner..Bit old thread but really like your opinion..

Definitely Canada has rich history and you can say one of the best place to live and spend quality life..
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BruceLear
post Aug 26 2014, 01:33 AM
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QUOTE(mumblestutter @ Oct 1 2009, 09:09 PM) *
nice thread! this may or may not be totally coherent b/c i may or may not be more than half a sleep right now, but here goes. gender is totally a cultural thing. activities and preferences that are associated with being masculine or feminine arbitrary. things that are considered "masculine" or "feminine" can change over time, or be assigned to different gender categories by different cultural groups.

the simplest example i can think of here is the "pink is for girls, blue is for boys" convention. there's no reason why a person should have innate attraction to these colors based on their sex. children are rewarded positively for modeling "gender appropriate" behavior and so often comply with convention. even children of gender neutral parents will receive positive feedback for modeling gendered behavior at school and around friends.

the "pink/blue" dichotomy did not emerge until the mid 20th century. before then powdered blue was the color for little girls and red was the color for little boys! pretty much the opposite as it is now. you can see this in early disney heroines like alice & sleeping beauty with their powder blue gowns.

i'm fascinated (and dismayed!) by the extent commercial enterprise now informs our personal concepts of gender. i think there may have been more rationality to gender concepts in the past, but now with television & mass media, people over wide distances can see the same definition of gender roles.

when it first hit the market, marlboro was a brand marketed as feminine & for women. later the company took a U-turn and decided to market their product at men creating the familiar marlboro man/cowboy killer imagery. there's NO reason why a cigarette should be feminine or masculine, but the campaign worked, resurrected a fading company, and created a lasting image of a "masculine" product.

jsmith, you mentioned a continuum of gender. have you ever read about alfred kinsey?

also, this american life produced a fascinating show where they interview two transgender children and their parents. it's fascinating to hear the children describe struggling with gender-identity at such a young age, as well as how their communities and parents react.

so, sorry for being a gigantic nerd. smile.gif i love this topic & really did pare down what i had to say.


Well I think you have defined it in better manner..Bit old thread but really like your opinion..
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anarch
post Feb 9 2011, 01:40 AM
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Thanks for linking that, aural. Good to have that stuff documented.
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auralpoison
post Feb 7 2011, 11:25 PM
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Injustice at Every Turn is a new report on the discrimination facing trans persons today. An interesting & infuriating read.


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angie_21
post Oct 17 2009, 01:19 PM
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QUOTE(koffeewitch @ Oct 16 2009, 09:18 AM) *
angie21 - AH, as I've said I think Canada is a wonderful place in so many ways.
The particular antrhopological theory I was talking about was in the news again just some months ago unfortunately. I was in college during the 1990s and I thought that theory was too archaic for 1995, let alone having to hear MORE research on this topic AGAIN. Now granted, it could have just been a slow news day and one of the reporters was trying to start a controversy.


Sometimes I get so mad at how dumb Canadians can be, it's nice to be reminded of what's good about our country, too. smile.gif

I'm always wary of new reports on science studies. Newspaper writers couldn't srting two concepts together coherently even if they did understand what they were reporting on. And most of the time they clearly don't understand it. They jump on easy, controvesial parts of the study that will make headlines, like comparing primate interaction to prostitution. I took my anthropology undergrad courses around 2002-2005, and I think it does take a while for older professors to catch on to the newer studies and theory. We had a lot of young, idealistic profs in my department, too.

Speaking of bad reporting of gender studies:

Horribly confusing article about a study of gender and children's chores at home from Canwest News

Compared to:

Article about the study that actually makes sense from Wall Street Journal
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koffeewitch
post Oct 16 2009, 10:18 AM
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angie21 - AH, as I've said I think Canada is a wonderful place in so many ways.
The particular antrhopological theory I was talking about was in the news again just some months ago unfortunately. I was in college during the 1990s and I thought that theory was too archaic for 1995, let alone having to hear MORE research on this topic AGAIN. Now granted, it could have just been a slow news day and one of the reporters was trying to start a controversy.


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angie_21
post Oct 8 2009, 09:42 PM
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wow, I can't keep up with everything here! awesome.

I found in most of my history classes that Candian history was portrayed as collective in terms of gender. Everyone was a part of it, or at least, everyone European was. Our courses didn't focus on the names of leaders so much as movements and events that whole gorups of people, male and female, were involved in. A much better reflection of reality, I think. When we moved to European history, well, I was lucky to have an awesome teacher who actually cared about what he was teaching us about. We learned about the men and women of the french revolution, male and female monarchs, and the importance of women during the world wars. Other than suffrage and feminism, gender didn't play a huge role in most topics we covered. Racism and ethnocentrism, however, those things still exist in our textbooks and still need to be addressed. Or maybe that was just the way I saw it. And if there was ever sexism in my classrooms, it was the teachers preferring female students under the assumption that we were better behaved and harder working. Some female teachers were downright rude to the boys in my classes.

Same thing for anthropology, I was again lucky - our department had a lot of female instructors and everything we learned was either balanced, or sometimes even more feminist focused than I was comfortable with, I mean, after a while the point can be overstated. We also spent a lot of time talking about old and outdated anthropological theories and how they were ethnocentric and gender-centric. I mean, it sounds like a lot of the stuff you were taught, koffeewitch, were theories in vogue before feminist anthropology of the 70s and 80s. Maybe again, I've been lucky. Maybe Alberta isn't as backwards as I think!

I am avidly reading about the transgendered issues people are discussing here, but due to a lack of knowledge on the topic I don't have much to contribute. Please keep writing, though, it's very informative!
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koffeewitch
post Oct 7 2009, 01:10 PM
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GT- That's really intriguing; I like the idea of different stages that seem to serve conflicting purposes, sometimes demonizing a given minority population and sometimes romanticizing aspects of them. I'll have to think that over for a few days and apply it to our populations that have gained more acceptance in the last 30 years or so to practice identifying the different stages you described.

BTW, I noticed several of you mentioning having anthropology majors in college (I also started out as an anthro major). I remember being furious over the male bias in interpretting primate behavior. I remember a big deal being made out of the "prostitution" theory. (I wish I remembered if this occured in orangotans or chimps, etc). Anyway, a scientist observed a male and female primate finding the same piece of food. The primates had sex, and the female took the food. This was interpretted as her bartering with sex/prostituting herself. Now wait a minute, here. IF the male had taken the food first after sex, we all know that it would be interpretted as him displaying dominance over her. Fucking her. He wouldn't be whoring himself for her pleasure he'd be showing her who's boss. And these people call themselves impartial scientists?


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girltrouble
post Oct 7 2009, 11:38 AM
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the one that i mentioned that comes across as everyone's favorite crazy aunt, i think is actually very sweet, and not very hateful. but no, in the same way that burlesque can be used to comment on feminine/gender rolls, so can drag, and one doesn't need to be an anti to do it. after all one can be attractive and smart, they aren't mutually exclusive. that said, there is a huge emphasis on beauty/sexuality for transwomen. quite honestly i have a ambiguous feeling towards the constant sexualization of t-girls. i know a lot of t-girls hate it, the jerry springer wave years back. my feeling is that is how these things start. this is my theory of the cultural assimilation of a minority other. it is what happens with all minorities. first the repellant alien stage, then it progresses to curiosity, then fetish/sex object, then, when that other becomes visible enough, the other is villified, and cast as villians, tricksters, then neutral, then friends, then as people. the first part of it is never really desirable, but in order for society at large, they need to go thru those steps to feel comfortable with someone that is "different." so while it might not be all that enjoyable to see nothing but sexualized images, if we take a broad view, visibility is raised, and the journey to being viewed by society slowly moves forward. but that is my theory. some people hate it, and i understand why. but my point isn't to say it's good. it's just that those are the steps as i see them. feel free to pick the theory apart. all theories should be tested to see if they hold water. wink.gif


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koffeewitch
post Oct 7 2009, 11:20 AM
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QUOTE(girltrouble @ Oct 7 2009, 09:52 AM) *
the two basic groups are those that are "pro" beauty, (the camp i came up in) and the anti beauty. the pro are probably the group that most people are familiar with, the emphaisis is trying to be 'lady like', feminine, pretty, etc. and the anti beauty, that work very hard to be, quite frankly, as ugly as possible. i don't say that as a critique, that is just the aesthetic. they tend to be more mocking, although in a few cases, it is done in a lovingly humorous way.

i. it's all shrouded in an intellectual veneer, but you don't have to scratch past the surface to feel the disdain.

but then, there is a group of men who specifically date transexuals because they hate women and are so afraid/offended by feminists, that t-girls are a female substitute they can take their rage out on.

girltrouble, you always bring so much food for thought to the table! I hardly know where to begin...First off, do you feel there are ANY "anti"s who are mocking the trappings of womanhood and not women themselves? Laughing at the ridiculous plastic boobs and tawdryness of it all? To me, drag queens have never been men who dress as women but more like men who dress as Barbie Dolls. The idea of someone using the props and costumes of "femininity" to make cultural/political statements really appeals to me. I think good drag is mutifaceted and even elusive in purpose at times. But I digress...

On men who use t-girls to take out rage/(self-loathing): I have seen so many sexualized images of transgendered women that terrify the living fuck out of me. (I guess we hardly ever see images of t-women that are NOT sexual, right)?? Anyway, the images I've seen always have a way of presenting transgendered women as some kind of freaky sex doll made for sadistic rape/mutilation fantasies. I guess men want to abuse a representation of their own feminine side. What better way to unleash all your self-loathing, your secret fears of being a fag, your shame over being intimidated by women than to take it out on someone you refuse to see as a real human being. I guess I feel transgendered women are pretty much always depicted as sex toys (atleast in those "chicks with dicks" type ads). When I consider the type of person who would find a walking breathing sex toy appealing, I literally shudder. The underlying message is that men who give up their male identity are not worthy of our respect and consideration, or any respect and consideration. I've seen the corresponding jokes in the media that imply when transgendered people are subject to violent crimes or otherwise victimized it is supposed to be funny. The only time I've seen t-women NOT be depicted soley as sex objects is when they are being depicted as pathetic/ridiculous. Or as cunning villains out to fool innocent red-blooded men into sex acts.

I don't know quite where I'm going with all this. I guess I feel that our society's treatment and attitudes toward those who have stepped out of their assigned gender box reveals something significant. I'd like to know current stats on rates of violence against gay/lesbian and transgendered communities. And the reaction of law enforcement and judges to such cases. I feel pretty confident in assuming this is another case of blame the victim.

JSmith: Actually learning to do handicrafts has been ironically one of my greatest joys. I strongly STRONGLY feel that self-sufficiency is a feminist virtue. And I'm so sad that the word "culture" now means something that we purchase and go to museums to find. There is something so satisfying about the process of creating things. Sometimes I think that we are a people dependent on anti-depressants because we have alienated ourselves from this universally human need. We now have networks of feminists who "take back the knit" and acknowledge that we should not look down on our foremothers who had these tremendous skills. Why did I look down on these useful skills merely because they were done by women? I SHOULD be just as proud of knitting warm mittens for my family as I am to flush and re-fill the antifreeze from the radiator.


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jsmith
post Oct 7 2009, 10:16 AM
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QUOTE(koffeewitch @ Oct 7 2009, 08:14 AM) *
Now what bums me, is I refused to learn so many of the skills that would've given me more independence as a very young woman. I was too proud to learn to cook, sew, knit a blanket, darn a pair of socks. NOW I love being able to do these things. Our culture thinks of genetically-modified, processed, cardboard crap as food. It seems if a person wants to take proper care of her/his own body, they must be able to cook with natural whole foods. I think of these skills as my rebellion against corporate capitalism...and I wish I had not been too defensive to learn them as a child.


Holy crap, I had that exact same problem... still do... LOL It's something I'm trying to get past.
Any time one of my parents would ask me to make a salad or do dishes, I would erupt. "Ask your SON to do it!"
Even now, if someone asks me to do something domestic, I have to try to stop myself from getting angry and feeling like I'm only being asked because I'm a female. The truth is, my dad does pretty much all of the cooking for the family, and does a great deal of the dishes (he likes to keep them done up while he's cooking).
As a consequence of my refusal, I'm pants at cooking. Well, the fact that I'm not terribly creative might have something to do with it, too tongue.gif If I wasn't a broke-ass college student and lived out on my own, I'd be in trouble blink.gif


I'm pretty sickened by the glaring lack of prominently discussed women in history. It seems that if you want to learn about more prominent women who make/made big contributions, you have to look in the present. Today my Cell Bio instructor mentioned who the Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and in Medicine went to. In Chemistry, there were two men and one woman, and in Medicine, there were either 3 women, or 2 women and 1 man. I'm delighted to see these things, because it's proof against the naysayers that women are every bit as capable as men are in the scientific fields. Hell, one of the biggest names in Immunology is that of a woman, and she's really revolutionizing our understanding of how the immune response works (her name is Polly Matzinger, if it interests you. She proposed the Danger Model).


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Shake off all the fears of servile prejudices, under which weak minds are serviley crouched. Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call on her tribunal for every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God, because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason than that of blind faith. Thomas Jefferson
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culturehandy
post Oct 7 2009, 10:00 AM
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I found that our teachers engaged all sutdents.

If there is one thing that enrages me, it's the idea that advertisers put forth that it's only Mom's who know. Really? Fucking really? Advertising agencies play a huge role in reaffirming gender and gender roles and it pisses me off. the way jsmith feels about dancers and women being objectified is the way I feel about women in commercials. It fills me with such a rage.


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ketto
post Oct 7 2009, 09:37 AM
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QUOTE(culturehandy @ Oct 7 2009, 08:37 AM) *
Being Canadian and all, I didn't see the founding father crap, Canadian history was learning about the first nations populations and small pox, and Quebec vs English Canadian and zzzz....

Plus, my parents were still up front, did I feel it was unfair, sure. but, there was also a series of adds in Canada (that still run) that highlight the accomplishments of all Canadians.

I still see the accomplishments of people as just that, accomplishments. Do I see the glass ceiling that exists, absolutely, but even despite all of this, I still didn't feel bound. Even when I was in grade school, our teachers taught us that any of us could do anything we wanted, again, regardless of gender.

Women weren't missing from our textbooks, we were taught about Laura Secord, Marie Curie, Suffragets, etc. History is dominated by men, sure, but I didn't think too much about that, i was too busy thinking about how dreadfully boring canadian history was (and it is boring) it wasn't until they got into scandal that it got interesting.

my current feminist fight is for things that are currently affecting women, and it was like that when I was growing up as well. I wasn't concerned about what happened in the past, some x amount of years ago. the fight I fight is for women of today. I recognize the past and using at a point of knowledge, but also acknowledge that I can't change the past. I do have the power, however, to change tomorrow.


Culture, this is an interesting post because we both (as far as I know) grew up in the same city. I felt much the same way you did as a child. I felt equal to my two brothers and my parents always made it clear we could all do whatever we wanted to. I was a very girly girl who loved playing 'house' and dressing up in dresses and having long hair and all that jazz. I took ballet and Tap dancing classes for years, but I also played soccer and baseball at spent my summers playing football, baseball, tag, hide and seek, and just being outside with the neighbourhood kids. There was a group of 7 of us who lived within 3 houses on my street (4 boys, 3 girls) and we would set up tennis tournaments, make movies, put on concerts for our parents, build forts in the basement, build lego towns, and all that kind of stuff. We didn't feel bound by much at that point. TV and magazines weren't very prominent in our house when I was growing up so I don't remember having any feelings tied to them in particular.

It wasn't until I got to late middle school/early high school (when I was 12-14) that I started to realized things were missing. I never learned about Laura Secord or Marie Curie in my school. I don't even remember talking about suffrage but I'm sure we must have. I know we watched all the Canada Heritage Minutes (the commercials culture mentioned) in a grade 11 class and I liked that THEY touched on Laura Secord, Emily Parsons, suffrage, but that's the extent I feel I learned about women in regards to history. We talked about the role of women in first nations communities historically, but I don't even remember going into that in high school, just middle school. I did feel cheated in regards to the amount of attention paid to women's historical contributions.

In high school it was obvious that certain teachers favoured the guys in the class and that alone greatly contributed to me never wanting to speak up. I also became keenly aware of femininst issues intertwining with GBLT issues in grade 11 when 3 students switched schools because they were being harrassed from homophobic students who called them gay. When we tried to form a gay/straight alliance, the parents in the neighbourhood refused to let us call it that and we instead called it the "Human Rights Group". I definitely found that I wanted to be involved in activism by grade 12 but I didn't really know what it looked like yet or what to call it.

In grade 12 I probably discovered feminism, but it wasn't until University when I found my home in Women's and Gender Studies that I realized it was what I had been looking for in High School. Answers to my questions about oppression, racism, sexism, gender identity, etc.


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culturehandy
post Oct 7 2009, 09:25 AM
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Koffee, with something like this, that goes to show my point about how much people want to be able to label something as black and white, no grey.

At an event such as this, what is a gay man going to do? or someone who is trans. what if it was someone like Caster semanya


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koffeewitch
post Oct 7 2009, 09:00 AM
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Ahhh, yes. Canada (longing sigh). There are SO MANY things I wish the U.S. would learn from watching Canada. I've long wished to jump the border (I'm SO close; just on the other side of the Great Lakes). I've spent a bit of time over on the Pardon Me (I'm Canadian) forum chatting with Canadian busties about what makes our two cultures so different in terms of things like violence and murders per capita and illiteracy when we have so many similarities as young nations.

But, I'm not trying to derail our discussion. Quick poll: In an envionment like the Womyn's Music Festival (held in Michigan) should transgendered women be included? Important background info: The WMF is a "safe place" for women and women only. Even male children are not allowed in past toddlerhood. Many/Most participants spend part of the festival running naked or topless. It IS essential to preserve the sanctity and safety at the festival. But would transgendered women threaten that sense of safety and "sacred woman space"??


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girltrouble
post Oct 7 2009, 08:52 AM
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ketto, i love that quote! thank you!

beck, i think you make a good point too.

to call it all theater, i thing is the point. we swim in this theater, and don't even notice it till it's pointed out. one person i always admired was this girl i knew. to say that she played with gender and that theater is and understatement. her day job was a stripper, but she was the best damn drag king you ever saw, and she would hop back and forth over the gender fence constantly. she would arrive at a show, in drop dead butch mode, do the show and leave for a date in high femme mode. if i didn't know better i would have thought she was two different people. but i think she is probably the only person who was always cognizant that it is all facade. it is all feigned. most people, even the queer fall into the trap that that costume is them, not a costume. the repetition makes it feel natural, in the same way that all those cutural signals we've consumed have left no tracks.


[eta. posted this at the same time as koffee and culture's posts]
i really think, star, that it comes down to the performer with drag if it is mocking or not. seattle is a good case in point. there are two main camps and then subcamps, but in each case you can divide them into those that adore women, and those that loathe them.

the two basic groups are those that are "pro" beauty, (the camp i came up in) and the anti beauty. the pro are probably the group that most people are familiar with, the emphaisis is trying to be 'lady like', feminine, pretty, etc. and the anti beauty, that work very hard to be, quite frankly, as ugly as possible. i don't say that as a critique, that is just the aesthetic. they tend to be more mocking, although in a few cases, it is done in a lovingly humorous way.

i can think of one rather affectionate anti queen who has her own cottage industry here doing seasonal shows that are always packed. she comes of like your crazy, but lovable old aunt who accidentally picks up slang words, referring to her circle of friends, and the audience as her "peeps." there are others on the anti camp who are much more hateful, being ugly seems to be their honest assessment of women, externally and internally. it's all shrouded in an intellectual veneer, but you don't have to scratch past the surface to feel the disdain.

on the other end, the pro beauty side of things, there are a couple of queens i adore. in or out of drag, they are sweethearts, they don't like to gossip, be catty, or any of the other things some on this side of things do, but more they are more than happy to give their time to women's causes as much as queer ones. then there are the bitches, who spew hate on everyone but to hear them talk about women.... i have seldom heard anyone talk so hatefully about a fellow human being. they delight in talking about women's bodies with disgust to the point you wonder why they would even want to touch anything associated with women let alone dress like one. the thing that kills me is when these queens decide to become transexuals. but then, there is a group of men who specifically date transexuals because they hate women and are so afraid/offended by feminists, that t-girls are a female substitute they can take their rage out on.


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"what a swell farewell party! we said goodbye to everything, including the lining in my stomach." - garvey, from the film, born bad

"That's one career all females have in common, whether we like it or not: being a woman. Sooner or later, we've got to work at it, no matter how many other careers we've had or wanted." --margo channing, all about eve
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culturehandy
post Oct 7 2009, 08:37 AM
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Being Canadian and all, I didn't see the founding father crap, Canadian history was learning about the first nations populations and small pox, and Quebec vs English Canadian and zzzz....

Plus, my parents were still up front, did I feel it was unfair, sure. but, there was also a series of adds in Canada (that still run) that highlight the accomplishments of all Canadians.

I still see the accomplishments of people as just that, accomplishments. Do I see the glass ceiling that exists, absolutely, but even despite all of this, I still didn't feel bound. Even when I was in grade school, our teachers taught us that any of us could do anything we wanted, again, regardless of gender.

Women weren't missing from our textbooks, we were taught about Laura Secord, Marie Curie, Suffragets, etc. History is dominated by men, sure, but I didn't think too much about that, i was too busy thinking about how dreadfully boring canadian history was (and it is boring) it wasn't until they got into scandal that it got interesting.

my current feminist fight is for things that are currently affecting women, and it was like that when I was growing up as well. I wasn't concerned about what happened in the past, some x amount of years ago. the fight I fight is for women of today. I recognize the past and using at a point of knowledge, but also acknowledge that I can't change the past. I do have the power, however, to change tomorrow.


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Hatred does not cease in this world by hating, but by not hating; this is an eternal truth. --- Buddah, The Dhammapada
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koffeewitch
post Oct 7 2009, 08:29 AM
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QUOTE(culturehandy @ Oct 7 2009, 08:40 AM) *
I have never felt bound by being a woman, or when i was growing up a girl. My parents always raised me to believe that I could do anything. gender never played a role in that.

Even now, my parents still pretty much tell me there is nothing I can't do, it's my mind that holds me back, not what's between my legs.

But culture, what about being a little girl and seeing only male presidents and "founding fathers of our country" and male writers in our lit. books? Okay, so there's a little paragraph or two about famous women in most textbooks, but that hardly makes up for the bias. I remember asking myself if women really were inferior to men because we never wrote/invented/excelled at the things men did. I certainly didn't FEEL I was inferior to boys, but I couldn't explain (at that naive young age) why the women were missing from my textbooks. Then I immediately wondered how the children who were racial minorites must feel. I didn't believe they were inferior either...but why didn't we have black senators? I can answer these questions NOW, but all this had a devastating effect on me as a child.


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"The U.S. is the only nation on Earth to pass from barbarism into decadence without once passing through an era of civilization."
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