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> 'Looks Like We Got Ourselves a Reader...'
anarch
post May 19 2010, 12:49 AM
Post #21


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Is Kingsolver's latest nonfiction Animal, Vegetable, Miracle? I enjoyed it (though have never had a problem getting into nonfiction). It described way more about our food system from the farmer's point of view, than any other food system critiques I've read (Pollan, Fast Food Nation, etc). She intersperses facts with stories from her family's years of working their land, so it's not as dry as "food system critique" makes it sound.
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pants
post May 17 2010, 04:38 AM
Post #22


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QUOTE(pepper @ May 15 2010, 03:21 AM) *
My library list grew by a foot just from coming in here.

The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver. I can't do it justice with a description I'm afraid. All I can say is that I couldn't put it down but was so sad to find I'd read it all so quickly. Has anyone else read her work? Before this I read The Bean Tree and sequel but this was very different.



ME! Me! I really like her books a lot and thought The Lacuna was great. Now that you mention The Bean Trees, I think I may hit the library to pick that book up for a reread. I think I've read all her novels, but haven't read her recent nonfiction book yet. I tend to be fussy with nonfiction and have a hard time getting into it.


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anarch
post May 17 2010, 02:07 AM
Post #23


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On little legs, I should have mentioned.
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anarch
post May 17 2010, 02:06 AM
Post #24


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I just finished a book of short stories by Primo Levi. Had never heard of him before. A lot of the stories were enchantingly whimsical. The one I liked best was about a poet who types out a poem on a piece of paper that literally gets away from him.
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pepper
post May 14 2010, 09:21 PM
Post #25







My library list grew by a foot just from coming in here.

The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver. I can't do it justice with a description I'm afraid. All I can say is that I couldn't put it down but was so sad to find I'd read it all so quickly. Has anyone else read her work? Before this I read The Bean Tree and sequel but this was very different.
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damona
post May 14 2010, 06:09 PM
Post #26


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i recently read garden spells by sarah addison allen. she also wrote the sugar queen. both just amazing books.

i'm currently reading by hook or by crook: a journey in search of english which is a linguistics study. actually quite fascinating.


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pants
post May 14 2010, 04:48 AM
Post #27


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From: London


New Maggie O'Farrell book! The Hand That First Held Mine.

I bought it but haven't started it yet. I've got a long train journey I'm saving it for and can't wait to start it. Her last book The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox hasen taken a place as one of my all time favourite books. She's a stunning author and I liker writing a lot.


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koffeewitch
post Apr 23 2010, 08:29 AM
Post #28


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From: the Hundred Acre Woods


QUOTE(nickclick @ Apr 23 2010, 05:38 AM) *
hi, we're pregnant and shopping for mother's day gifts.....any suggestions for good (but not chicken soup-y schmaltz) books for the future grandmas?


I don't know about books for grandmas, but bookstores have some beautiful photo albums now adays. Maybe something special to put new baby photos in? My favorite baby photo albums are the ones where they re-print classic children's books with spaces to put baby photos/write a few words of your own. I have one for my kids that makes it like reading a story about the world and stars and telling them the story of their own birth all at the same time.


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nickclick
post Apr 23 2010, 04:38 AM
Post #29


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hi, we're pregnant and shopping for mother's day gifts.....any suggestions for good (but not chicken soup-y schmaltz) books for the future grandmas?
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go_kayte
post Dec 8 2009, 11:09 PM
Post #30


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I am reading Thus Spake Zarathustra by Nietzsche right now because it is supposed to be poignant and important philosophy, but this guy is a TOTAL ASSHOLE! He said women are a puzzle and the only solution is pregnancy. And that womens' souls are akin to cats and birds and cannot achieve Superman - but hey maybe if we get knocked up by a special guy we can give birth to the Superman and that would be the highest achievement of any woman.

BARRRRRFFFF


It's not that good.

This post has been edited by go_kayte: Dec 8 2009, 11:10 PM
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koffeewitch
post Dec 8 2009, 11:41 AM
Post #31


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From: the Hundred Acre Woods


QUOTE(sybarite @ Dec 4 2009, 09:25 AM) *
7sec, I love The Good Terrorist, although it took me a second read to fully grasp its ambiguities. Excellent, if deeply cynical, analysis of the reasons people get involved in political action. I think Lessing really looks at the intersections between political activity and what I'll reductively call human nature... clearly from experience.

I love her short stories too, particularly (for reasons you identify) those set in Africa. The Golden Notebook is denser and (I think) more uneven in some ways, but well worth a look for its mid-20th-century feminist perspective.


I'm a big fan, too of her stories set in Africa. She has an interesting way of dissecting the issues of privilege and guilt without stumbling all over a bunch of platitudes or dismissing these subjects in trite, sophisticated-sounding cliches. There's some real substance in her stories, and she doesn't let her characters off easy.

Has anyone ever read the short stories of Paul Bowles...mostly set round Morocco and other parts of the world he lived and traveled. Dark, difficult, disturbing stuff but with a rapier wit...I've wondered more than once about his state of mind even though I adore his work.


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sevenseconds
post Dec 7 2009, 09:51 PM
Post #32


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Succinct and nailing it as always, Sybarite.
For some reason when I was typing absolute power, her later *sufi-sci fi* novels flashed through my head (talk about uneven) where the agents always try to weasel their way out of their "higher duty" but know they'll have to do it all over again if they do. Yet most of them still "put up a fight". And yes, with her the why is almost bigger than the how. I have often wondered reading her if an altruistic calling to make the world a better place really exists, or is it all A/ an adrenaline high and B/ our ego's smoke and mirrors over what's in fact the need to kick our own mom/dad in the teeth.
The Golden Notebook is uneven, way, but there are parts of it that are as golden as silence -- or am I collapsing it with The Four-Gated City, her other brick, (even more uneven) where she argues the point for the human right to unmedicated borderline states as a tool for knowing both the self and how the world really works. I must admit it's a contact high, her *tenderly looked-after madness* pages and the trust she puts in wisdom over sanity. Her log of the semi-contracted semi-induced psychotic state is so brutally honest. Well, honest is Dorris Lessing's middle name.
And also true how she rides the cynic line and with every read you figure out how to better close one eye and blink with the utter believer and close the other and scoff with the jaded skeptic.

But also, her commitment to honesty often takes its price in her style. Hm. Does it have to be like that?

This post has been edited by sevenseconds: Dec 7 2009, 09:58 PM


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sybarite
post Dec 4 2009, 07:25 AM
Post #33


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7sec, I love The Good Terrorist, although it took me a second read to fully grasp its ambiguities. Excellent, if deeply cynical, analysis of the reasons people get involved in political action. I think Lessing really looks at the intersections between political activity and what I'll reductively call human nature... clearly from experience.

I love her short stories too, particularly (for reasons you identify) those set in Africa. The Golden Notebook is denser and (I think) more uneven in some ways, but well worth a look for its mid-20th-century feminist perspective.
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sevenseconds
post Dec 2 2009, 12:50 AM
Post #34


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Can't resist asking, in light of this and that, has anyone read The Good Terrorist by Doris Lessing. Cannot recommend it highly enough.

The woman was a hardcore British communist for many years, from before (and during) the time it became a dirty word here. Lots of her stuff has to do with absolute power and how we choose to fight it.

She grew up in then Rhodesia, btw, and The grass is Singing is such a breath taking study of the *fear>attraction>obsession* paradigm of touching the Other, I got goosebumps just typing the title. Her The Godlen Notebook is the feminist novel of all time.

And she is one of the few women novelists with a Nobel Prize.
But The Good Terrorist. Seriously.

This post has been edited by sevenseconds: Dec 2 2009, 12:56 AM


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nickclick
post Nov 30 2009, 11:54 AM
Post #35


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my favorite book-to-movie is Age of Innocence. Scorsese's visuals are more elaborate than i could have ever imagined.
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rogue
post Nov 30 2009, 09:15 AM
Post #36


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From: The Great White North.


The only book-to-movie transition I was really pissed about was Flowers in the Attic. It's my favourite book/series of all time and I was pissed when they took out the most significant part - Chris and Cathy's incestuous relationship. I mean, yes, incest is disgusting and wrong and illegal but come on, it was what made the book the book! It was so important to their story and the film just butchered it. I'm still not over it. The film itself was merely okay to me, and not only because of that, it was just really lacking to me. If it's on television I might watch it but I'd never, ever, ever choose it over reading the book. I'm so bitter about it.

But yes, as for TTTW (The Time Traveler's Wife), I'd recommend it. It was decent.


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pants
post Nov 30 2009, 08:29 AM
Post #37


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Rogue I think we have similar movie viewing strategies smile.gif

I used to get really frustrated with movies ased on books but then had an epiphany one day and said to myself, 'Dude, this is a movie, it is separate from the book, it is okay if they are different.'

It makes my moviegoing experience so much less stressful

I'll put it on my lovefilm queue


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rogue
post Nov 30 2009, 08:24 AM
Post #38


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I'm a little behind in this but I both read and saw The Time Traveler's Wife and enjoyed both, pants. I will say that I enjoyed the novel more and found the film a little inconsistent, but, that being said, it takes a lot for me to hate a film. A lot. I'm not one who will read a book and then go to the film to compare both, I go to enjoy the film. I went to see it with a friend of mine who also read the book - she said if one hadn't read the book it would probably be really confusing and I tend to agree.

I think the film is worth it if you like to visualize characters "in real life", but some might not. I don't think it was too much of a departure from the novel. The one thing I will say is it was probably the most uncomfortable movie experience of my life - people in the theatre were literally sobbing all around me. Heaving, hysterical-type sobs. That was interesting.

Right now I'm re-reading (for the third time) The Mortal Instruments series by Cassandra Clare. I know a lot of people don't like her but whatever - I find this series a thousand times better than Twilight. It's young adult fiction as well, but sometimes I need some fantasy in my life. laugh.gif


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pants
post Nov 30 2009, 03:29 AM
Post #39


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How smutty are you looking for epinephrine?

Emma Holly is an okay writer of smut, same goes for Portia da Costa. Both deal a fair bit in bondage and bi scenes. You might want to look into publishers like Ellora's Cave and Black Lace. I know Harlequin has their Spice line which I believe is raunchier than their typical novels. They actually have a variety of lines of fiction that go from chaste kisses and handholding to random assignations in alleys with multiple strangers. Probably if you go to their website there's a list detailing levels raunch.



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epinephrine
post Nov 29 2009, 02:59 PM
Post #40


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Not sure if this is the right thread for this, but can anyone recommend some decent erotica or smutty novels? I'm not too particular about themes and genders and all that, as long as it's well-written. I'd even be happy with badly-written erotica, as long as it's sexy enough. I'd be especially interested in a novel, something I could spend a little more time with and get to know the characters a little better. Erotica has a way better hold on the imagination when you really know the characters. I've been reading a lot of short erotic stories and they're just not satisfying enough.

Besides the various volumes of erotica I've been reading, I've finished Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, which was as poetically visceral and disturbing as Beloved, though it felt a little overwritten at times. I've just started Sena Jeter Naslund's Ahab's Wife, which was recommended to me by a woman whose taste in books and movies was remarkably similar to mine, but I haven't really gotten into it yet. And! I met my favourite author last week! She gave a talk at the university and I got to talk to her and have my picture taken with her and tell her personally how much I adore her writing and give her a little card telling her how much she's influenced and inspired me! She was such a sweetheart. It was really, really cool to meet her. Of course, I couldn't find a copy of Monkey Beach for her to sign because I've lent them all out to friends, but I brought her other two books with me and got one signed for me and another signed for a good friend who couldn't make it. It'll be his Christmas present. She wrote him a cute little Christmas greeting in it and everything.


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