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> Too Much Religion For Me To Handle
roseviolet
post Jan 26 2009, 11:18 AM
Post #41


Pacifism kicks ass!
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Posts: 3,064


JSmith, it's because they will miss having that person in their life. If a loved one dies - even if they believe they'll be reunited in the afterlife - they still don't know when that will be. It could be decades.

Just think of the people who you love in your life. Think of all of the things you did with them, the times you've laughed and cried together. Now imagine if they hadn't been a part of your life for the past decade. It would have a huge impact on you, wouldn't it. So basically, they mourn deceased loved ones for the same reason you probably do: because they'll miss their presence & influence in their lives.
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jsmith
post Jan 26 2009, 10:52 AM
Post #42


It's Calamity Jenn
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Posts: 643
From: Lone Star State


Here's something I've never understood:
Xtianity (among other relgions) believes in this conscious afterlife. Individuals are so positive that they will see their loved ones who have already passed on. So when somebody they love dies, why do they mourn? They're allegedly convinced of this afterlife. Why don't they treat it like the person just moved somewhere else?
I can't reconcile these two things. Do you think there's an atheist in all of us?


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Shake off all the fears of servile prejudices, under which weak minds are serviley crouched. Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call on her tribunal for every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God, because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason than that of blind faith. — Thomas Jefferson
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twelve_percent
post Dec 31 2008, 05:52 PM
Post #43


BUSTie
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Posts: 61
From: The grassy nolls


I really love god but, like everything worth loving, there is a lot of stuff you have get past before you can connect on a real level.

People who judge you based on their relationship with god don't have a healthy relationship at all.


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Listen to my music and you will feel complete! www.myspace.com/kellyinezmusic
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deschatsrouge
post Dec 31 2008, 12:46 AM
Post #44


A symphony of atrocities.
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Posts: 1,437
From: The Sage Brush Steppes


bumpity bump for 12%


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"Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live." -Exodus 22:18
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nohope
post Nov 14 2008, 11:33 AM
Post #45


Hardcore BUSTie
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Posts: 460


Who and what inspires your targets—say, the lawyers in Salzburg? Surely it's not greed that makes them agree with such lunacy.
Right: it's mostly faith.
The power of faith to transcend the most obvious logic is a well-established phenomenon. When the Crusaders discovered themselves in pitched battle against Christians they had travelled thousands of miles to save, they refused to amend their theory that these Christians needed their help. Faith!
Faith, likewise, spurred thirty-nine web developers to don Nikes and swallow poison, on the theory—not backed by much solid evidence—that they’d shortly meet up on the Hale-Bopp Comet. (The “Heaven’s Gate” suicide was remarkable among mass suicides for its interface with observational astronomy.) And when Appalachian snake handlers insist on dancing with poisonous critters, despite not-so-rare deaths and lost limbs, it is from faith in the theory that God is protecting them. (The basis for this often-contradicted theory is two Biblical verses: “They shall take up serpents; and if they drink any deadly thing, it shall not hurt them”—Mark 16:18—and “Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions”—Luke 10:19.)
Similarly, our audience of lawyers in Salzburg had a theory—that the free market could bring happiness to the world at large—and they had the deepest possible faith in it. We had imagined that if we pushed our proposals into the outer limits of ugliness, we could horrify our audience into objecting. But the nature of their faith was such that so long as our proposals derived from the one true theory, there was no way they would ever see anything wrong with them.
We weren’t the first sloppy satirists to make the mistake. In 1703, a troublemaker named Daniel Defoe, seeking to show the absurdity of a bill forbidding non-Anglicans to hold public office, had suggested in a widely-published pamphlet that barring the scoundrels from office was a big waste of time, and that it would be much more efficient to simply execute them:

It is cruelty to kill a snake or a toad in cold blood, but the poison of their nature makes it a charity to our neighbours, to destroy those creatures! not for any personal injury received, but for prevention; not for the evil they have done, but the evil they may do!.... How many millions of future souls, [shall] we save from infection and delusion, if the present race of Poisoned Spirits were purged from the face of the land!... The light foolish handling of them by mulcts, fines, etc.; 'tis their glory and their advantage! If the Gallows instead of the Counter, and the galleys instead of the fine were the reward of going to [non-Anglican churches], there would not be so many... As Scipio said of Carthage, Delenda est Carthago! ... Let Us Crucify The Thieves!
[Note: Defoe was no scholar: it was Cato who pronounced Carthage deletable—Scipio merely did the deleting.]


Defoe, to his shock, found his histrionic, inaccurate, and profoundly ridiculous words taken seriously. A large number of radical Anglicans, thinking one of them had authored the screed, came out loudly in favor of execution; this solution, after all, was quite clearly consistent with the widely accepted theory that only Anglicans had any virtue, and that all others were “Poisoned Spirits” in the body politic.
We too discovered that once a premise is laid—whether it be the toxicity of dissenters or the friendliness of free markets—there is no way to push the implications enough to shake off believers. Why should international trade lawyers, presented with logical conclusions of a theory they deeply believe and practice each day, be any different from snake handlers,Crusaders, or radical Anglicans?
Since we hadn’t read Defoe, we were condemned to repeat him. At least we found ourselves just somewhat poorer, rather than, like Defoe, rotting in jail awaiting the pillory....

http://www.theyesmen.org/faq
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faerietails
post Nov 7 2008, 10:47 PM
Post #46


donut-lovin' heathen
***
Posts: 624


*snort*

cocl, you almost made me spit out my seltzer!
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crazyoldcatlady
post Nov 7 2008, 09:04 PM
Post #47


the moistiest
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Posts: 1,700
From: here. in my head.


QUOTE
Gnosticism

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnosticism

wikipedia it's your fiend


yeeeeeeeeeeeeeah, that's a pretty obvious place to start. i was looking more for bustie personal experience.

and yes. wikipedia is a "fiend."
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nohope
post Nov 7 2008, 05:02 PM
Post #48


Hardcore BUSTie
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Posts: 460


Gnosticism

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnosticism

wikipedia it's your fiend
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crazyoldcatlady
post Nov 2 2008, 08:07 PM
Post #49


the moistiest
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Posts: 1,700
From: here. in my head.


what do you ladies & gents know about gnosticism?
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zoya
post Aug 29 2008, 07:12 AM
Post #50


uh huh.
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Posts: 1,818
From: the world.


**delurks**

there was a time in my life that if it wasn't for the Hare Krishna temple a mile down the road from my apartment, that I would have been eating ramen all the time. I thought they were great - I never ever felt forced into even participating in their religion, they just sang a bunch of songs then served dinner, and if you wanted to stay for the talk after, you could - or they'd give you a hug and send you on your way, telling you you were welcome any time. I remember back in the day when people said they were a cult, and now no one even gives them a second thought..
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ellenevenstar
post Aug 28 2008, 08:10 AM
Post #51


Hardcore BUSTie
***
Posts: 234
From: terra australis


AP and faerietales - Buddhism and Hinduism are big on figurines - some are beautiful, majestic and meaningful. Some are tacky. There are lots of giant Buddhas around the place too, but certainly not on the sides of highways, as far as I'm aware - they are in places where people actually WANT to see them! We have lots of giant things in Australia (The Big Pineapple, The Big Merino, The Big Prawn...) but I've never seen giant crosses like that anywhere here.

AP & mornington - yes, I totally agree. People don't get that there are many ways of being Muslim / Jewish / Christian / Sikh / Buddhist / Hindu etc etc etc etc. Within the vague orientation of their religion, people use their own discernment and reason to decide how to live. It sometimes amazes me that people with such wildly different beliefs and practices belong to the same religon. I think it's a good thing that this diversity exists, but most people tend to imagine a religious stereotype based on very little knowledge and assume that anyone who adheres to any given religion is the same.

Which segues nicely to my next point...

Re: I'm not praying (Cath Elliott) - Thanks for the link mornigton, I did find that interesting & worth reading. She says "the term 'Christian feminist' is an oxymoron" - sorry, but that is a huge overgeneralisation. I agree that, for the most part, Christianity has been (and definitely continues to be) a vomit-inducingly patriarchal and oppressive institution but if Cath Elliott knew much about contemporary theology or knew some of the insipring, strong, autonomous, feminist nuns and Catholic school teachers and aid workers that I know, I don't think she would be declaring such a sweeping write off of the whole religion. It's like when people tell me that because I'm in a heterosexual relationship I must be oppressed. How insulting, like I've got no clue about my own life / relationship / religion.
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auralpoison
post Aug 25 2008, 05:32 PM
Post #52


Big Fat Bitch
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Posts: 4,932
From: Citizen of the world


See, exactly! People often choose how closely they adhere to the rules in their *personal* relationship with their chosen deity. I recall telling my friend's brother about liquor store guy & he insisted that I "must be mistaken" about him being a Muslim. He himself was a very lapsed Catholic, I was surprised at his being so hardlined on things. It didn't bother Khalid to sell me vodka, so I was like whatever. Khalid still sold me booze & offered up interesting commentary about whatever late night show was on when I came in.


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"You're cute, like a velvet glove cast in iron. And like a gas chamber, a real fun gal."
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mornington
post Aug 25 2008, 03:36 PM
Post #53


now running on biodiesel and sacrificial blood
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Posts: 2,227
From: the little house on the hill


quite a few of the cornershop off-licenses around here are run by muslims. Hell, I know plenty of muslims who drink (the mothership's boyfriend being one of them). If people choose a religion, they also choose how much to adhere to the rules of that religion, same as plenty of catholics use condoms and plenty of jews don't pray three times a day.


that would be a fantastic prayer rug laugh.gif
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auralpoison
post Aug 25 2008, 01:22 PM
Post #54


Big Fat Bitch
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Posts: 4,932
From: Citizen of the world


I was just using it as an example, no shirk intended. A black light prayer rug instead?

The little man that owned the little liquor store I went to was Muslim. I knew that he couldn't consume alcohol nor sell it according to Hadith, but there he was selling hooch to the heathens. We'd gotten to be quite friendly & when I asked about it, he likened it to being a Jew that liked bacon or a Catholic on BC. Allah would forgive him for making a living. Otherwise he was observant. Well, he did like to ogle my boobs.

The only time I've ever really enjoyed lentils was at that Temple. Dang, those were good.


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"You're cute, like a velvet glove cast in iron. And like a gas chamber, a real fun gal."
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Queen Bull
post Aug 25 2008, 12:51 PM
Post #55


Hardcore BUSTie
***
Posts: 228
From: the rainbow of self discovery


*delurk* i was a member of the 'krishnas' for a while. It was very interesting. and i agree with AP, they have great food. smile.gif *relurks*


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I love gentiles. In fact, protestant spotting is one of my favorite pastimes. :) ooh.. whats that? me thinks its a blog
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mornington
post Aug 25 2008, 12:22 PM
Post #56


now running on biodiesel and sacrificial blood
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Posts: 2,227
From: the little house on the hill


weeeeeell... representations of Mohammed are haraam wink.gif Although personally, I think the little jeebus figurines are really creepy, so maybe islam is just displaying some good sense.

I think I've seen a Krishna in the airport, years ago, but they weren't singing or anything - so maybe they were meeting a friend. Although I've also seen a pair of Krishnas in a bike rickshaw, and they *were* singing and drumming and making everyone stare.
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auralpoison
post Aug 25 2008, 11:32 AM
Post #57


Big Fat Bitch
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Posts: 4,932
From: Citizen of the world


Nevermind. I got it now.

It's weird, though. I've never seen a black velvet King David painting or little figurines of Mohammad playing baseball with small children. Why is Christianity so goddamned tacky sometimes?

ETA, It suddenly occurs to me that I have never actually seen a Hare Krishna in an airport. I eat at their temple sometimes because the food is good, the company interesting, & it's free. Yeah, I still kick a tenner to the kitty, but it is free.


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"You're cute, like a velvet glove cast in iron. And like a gas chamber, a real fun gal."
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pollystyrene
post Aug 25 2008, 11:17 AM
Post #58


Too many mutha uckas, Uckin' with my shi-
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Posts: 4,631
From: Chicago


QUOTE(auralpoison @ Aug 25 2008, 10:40 AM) *
You don't see the Jews building giant stars of David everywhere or building a massive menorah in an empty field. There are no giant Crescent moons off of I70 reminding you that "Allah is coming so you better look busy!"


You don't see the rest of us telling other Busties their contributions to a thread are worthless, either.


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You went to school where you were taught to fear and to obey, be cheerful, fit in, or someone might think you're weird.
Life can be perfect. People can be trusted. Someday, I will fall in love; a nice quiet home of my very own.
Free from all the pain. Happy and having fun all the time.
It never happened, did it?
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auralpoison
post Aug 25 2008, 10:40 AM
Post #59


Big Fat Bitch
***
Posts: 4,932
From: Citizen of the world


No, I haven't but I've always liked the design of his books. I like a good cover & have read some interesting things that way!

It's interesting. I typed "giant crosses" into Google & read a wealth of odd things.

You don't see the Jews building giant stars of David everywhere or building a massive menorah in an empty field. There are no giant Crescent moons off of I70 reminding you that "Allah is coming so you better look busy!"


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"You're cute, like a velvet glove cast in iron. And like a gas chamber, a real fun gal."
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mornington
post Aug 25 2008, 10:29 AM
Post #60


now running on biodiesel and sacrificial blood
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Posts: 2,227
From: the little house on the hill


A friend of mine showed this to me the other day, thought it might be an interesting read for people here (Cath Elliot is always an interesting read anyway, this just reminded me of this thread a little)

Comment is Free: I'm Not Praying

AP, I'm going to add it to the "to read" list (have you read any Christopher Brookmyre?)

Faerie - I've always wondered about that, although I kinda figured some of them were old and some kind of monument. But yes, they always seemed... pointless. Domineering and threatening sometimes, but beautiful in others (the one I saw in South Africa that seemed part of the landscape as it was local stone and surrounded by grown trees etc)

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