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> 'Looks Like We Got Ourselves a Reader...'
nickclick
post May 12 2011, 06:40 AM
Post #1


Hardcore BUSTie
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Posts: 2,134
From: jersey


add me!

it's also a good way to keep track of what you read a good review on when you get to the library/bookstore/amazon site.
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miniskirtordeath
post May 10 2011, 10:42 PM
Post #2


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From: CA


QUOTE(nickclick @ May 10 2011, 04:35 PM) *
anyone on Goodreads?


Um, no. But it looks like I should. Seems pretty nice way to keep track of books read, too.
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nickclick
post May 10 2011, 06:35 PM
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From: jersey


anyone on Goodreads?
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miniskirtordeath
post May 10 2011, 11:53 AM
Post #4


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Right now I'm reading The Boy Detective Fails by Joe Meno. It's fun, so far. Before that was Indian Killer by Sherman Alexie. I've been working my way down his list of books. Alexie is a genius.
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nickclick
post Feb 3 2011, 03:53 PM
Post #5


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From: jersey


just read Everything Matters! by Ron Currie for a book club. eh.
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genghis cunt
post Feb 1 2011, 06:59 PM
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From: Florida


I'm also reading Stiff by Mary Roach. It's about the scientific and medical use of cadavers.
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Synergy
post Feb 1 2011, 03:30 PM
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From: europe


I just read 1984 by Orwell.
It was the second time i read it, but the first was more than 10 years ago so i didn't remember the storyline very well. But i knew it was really good. And it still is!


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If there are no stupid questions, then what kind of questions do stupid people ask? Do they get smart just in time to ask questions?

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genghis cunt
post Jan 25 2011, 08:43 AM
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From: Florida


The Enormous Room by E.E. Cummings.
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anarch
post Jan 23 2011, 02:03 PM
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I thought Bait and Switch was not as good as Nickel and Dimed, primarily because she's trying to pass herself off as a PR person, but because she hasn't actually worked in the industry, she hasn't got any real contacts. Which skews the experiment from the get-go.

Bright-Sided I appreciated because I've had run-ins with people whose religiosity about "think positive" verges on shit like blaming Jews for bringing the Holocaust down upon themselves.

On the other hand, I'm just finishing a book called Positivity that details studies that have proved that genuine positive thinking in non-terminal-disease circumstances really can affect physiological, not just psychological, responses. I'm curious about whether the author will address contexts like being diagnosed with a serious or fatal disease, or whether she thinks her work is relevant to people with clinical depression. (She probably won't. She actually spends more time on "how to think positive" than the science, which I think is too bad. There's enough "think positive" manuals out there already.)


I came in here to post this delightful comment about Lolita (I just watched the 1997 Jeremy Irons movie and was looking around to see if my recollection of the book was correct):

"Due to the scandalous material of the story, Lolita ended up being published by the Olympia Press, which was generally known as a pornography publisher. All Olympia Press titles came out with the same plain green text-only cover. Now, (if I'm remembering this story correctly) Appel [editor and annotator of The Annotated Lolita]was in the army when he read Lolita, and once a fellow soldier saw the book, and taking it for porn, eagerly grabbed it and started reading aloud to the rest of the platoon. "Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps... Awww shit, this ain't porn, it's goddamn littrachur!""
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sybarite
post Jan 13 2011, 08:36 AM
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I've read (and re-read) Nickel and Dimed, and read an interview with her about Bright-Sided. I really like her approach and her integrity, how she examines and explores areas of life which most people think can't be changed. Everyone should read Nickel and Dimed, for the perspective it provides alone.

How is Bait and Switch?
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damona
post Jan 12 2011, 10:31 PM
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*bump*

i've been reading Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America by Barbara Ehrenreich. i liked it. i would say that i tend to be realistically optimistic, but all this "you can do anything if you just put your mind to it!" crap has always annoyed me. i mean, i can visualize that nice, new SUV that starts every time i want it to, and the big house where each of my boys has their own room and i have a library, but somehow, i just don't think that will ever happen in my life. and there's no point in living in a dream world when i've got enough shit to deal with in this one, y'know?

i've read Nickel and Dimed, and Bait and Switch by her, too. has anyone else read her stuff? what do you think?


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"give me life, give me pain, give me myself again" - tori amos
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pants
post Jul 21 2010, 07:14 AM
Post #12


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From: London


Syb, I definitely liked it less this time than I did at age 16 or 17 in the 90s. That said it was worth rereading just to see where Atwood started and how she's developed since then. Certain scenes really struck me as being precursors to The Blind Assassin. Still it's a pretty bleak book in a lot of ways.


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sybarite
post Jul 21 2010, 05:52 AM
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I've just finished Ken McLeod's Cosmonaut Keep (science-fiction, in case the title didn't give it away...). Before that I was halfway through Iain M Banks' Matter but have abandoned it to read... David Geffen's biography. I can't believe I admitted that out loud.

Pants, I wasn't crazy about The Edible Woman, but maybe that's because it really reflects the time it was written (the late 60s/early 70s?) and is kind of disheartening. I liked Sense and Sensibility though; I think it gets overlooked.
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pants
post Jul 21 2010, 04:39 AM
Post #14


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From: London


QUOTE(damona @ Jul 21 2010, 08:44 AM) *
iwhat's everyone else reading?



I've just reread The Edible Woman for my book club (we're reading all Margaret Atwood's books in order, slightly less crazy than War & Peace I hope)

And have The Eyre Affair on deck even though I've never finished Jane Eyre. I'm hoping I've gleaned enough details about the source materials over the years to muddle my way through any tricky bits


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I am not a reliable narrator
This is a place where I talk about other stuff, and try to make it interesting.
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damona
post Jul 21 2010, 02:44 AM
Post #15


can i go to bed now?
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From: i'm the queen of far far away


i just started reading Sense and Sensibility. i can't believe i never read it before, but there ya go.

what's everyone else reading?


--------------------
"give me life, give me pain, give me myself again" - tori amos
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doxy
post Jul 3 2010, 12:06 PM
Post #16


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Posts: 109
From: New Orleans


Thank you ladies.
Yes, I've slacked on the wine post. I've been slacking in general...so hard to get out of this funk? For another topic I guess:)
Anyway, I'm going to the book store now for Tipping the Velvet and McElhatton's new book. I host at the end of this month...I'll let you know what we choose:)
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Persiflager
post May 25 2010, 06:40 AM
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From: Babylon


Ooh, I loved 'The Night Watch'! That'd be a great subject for book-club analysis (and has fewer explicit sex-scenes than 'Tipping the Velvet' so you shouldn't get too many crass comments).


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“Logic is the art of going wrong with confidence.”
Morris Kline (mathematician, author) 1908-1992
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sybarite
post May 22 2010, 07:17 AM
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Nice to see you Doxy; whither your wine postings? Dunno from Sarah Adams but I'd recommend anything by Sarah Waters, an award-winning British novelist. Fingersmith and Tipping the Velvet are probably her best known books; I haven't read them but I have read The Night Watch and The Little Stranger, which were excellent. The Night Watch has a reverse chronology which would be an interesting topic to discuss in a book group. At least three of her books centre on lesbian characters which I suppose qualifies them as' lady lit'... and should suit your purposes nicely.
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doxy
post May 22 2010, 01:58 AM
Post #19


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Posts: 109
From: New Orleans


Greetings.
I come to you with my full attention and confidence that you all will help me with a certain literal situation I am in.
My book club chose War and Peace this year. What happened was most of us were out of town and the host didn't have time to find books to choose for the following month and so the few attendees that were there decided to do War and Peace for 2 months...skipping a book club meeting all-to-gether.
Well, I am about vengence and I happen to know two of the persons to blame for the abomination of choosing War and Peace for Book Club are anti-female when it comes to literature.
This is not a joke, I have been with Bust for almost 8 years.
Last year I got "Jennifer Johnson is Sick of Being Single" from my friends here and I aim to do the same lady-lit for when I host bookclub next month.
Seriously, what are some witty female oriented books that your lot have read lately that can serve as ammunition for when I pay those chumps back in a month?
Thank you in advance.
ps. the Sarah Adams books look intrigueing? Are they what I'm searching for?
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pants
post May 19 2010, 03:18 AM
Post #20


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Posts: 106
From: London


Anarch, yes that's the one I was thinking of! I was just too lazy to go to amazon and look it up myself smile.gif

Every time I see it, I think, oh you should read that, but then I don't despite the fact that I've only heard good things about it and it looks interesting.

I am just over half way through The Hand That First Held Mine and am enjoying it a lot. It's got the twisty sort of plot that O'Farrell often does, jumping between late 50's early 60's London to modern day and all with beautiful detail and great affection for the characters who I assume are intertwined somehow, just not sure HOW yet. Her books always make me feel half jealous that I'm not her and half inspired to write more.


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I am not a reliable narrator
This is a place where I talk about other stuff, and try to make it interesting.
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