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> Pardon me (I'm Canadian)
koffeewitch
post Jul 2 2010, 08:19 AM
Post #21


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Holy, holy shit, pepper!!! Arnica? Grapefruit seed extract? Fucking lavender oil? This is not going on in the states right now, but needless to say the very idea that a generally more rational nation like Canada would pull this crap is terrifying.


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"The U.S. is the only nation on Earth to pass from barbarism into decadence without once passing through an era of civilization."
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pepper
post Jun 26 2010, 06:32 AM
Post #22







We're in southern O so no but we did get smacked with that tornado a couple of weeks ago. Some fun weather we're having round the place, eh? This is what comes of draining the world's blood and fekking with the environment so much. It's a delicate balance and we are out there with sledgehammers.

In other news, Health (I use that word humourously) Canada and the RCMP have started raiding natural stores, pulling product off the shelves and forcing closures. You say you like to use mint tea for an upset tummy, valerian to help you relax, the humble rosehip for Vit C? Not any more you don't. If it ain't drugs, you ain't allowed to use it.
We're in trouble here sisters, Granny's folk remedies are facing the inquisition and just like the witch hunts some mighty fine folk are scheduled for the bonfires.
http://marigoldnatural.blogspot.com/2010/0...macy-draws.html
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coffeebean
post Jun 24 2010, 07:16 AM
Post #23


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Yep I felt it. Although I had so much coffee yesterday that I wasn't sure if it was a real earthquake or just caffeine symptoms. Perhaps I should cut back smile.gif That is the first earthquake I really remember feeling.
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ketto
post Jun 23 2010, 04:33 PM
Post #24


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Crazy, I've been at work all day and didn't even hear about it. Plus I'm in MB.


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sukouyant
post Jun 23 2010, 11:57 AM
Post #25


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Bumping this thread to ask if anyone else felt that earthquake in Ontario today? They're saying people felt it in parts of New York and Ohio too.
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koffeewitch
post Apr 21 2010, 08:19 AM
Post #26


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Yeah, our veggie libel laws (aka the veggie hate bill) is something out of a dystopian sci-fi novel. Our food lobbyists literally have infinite power, as far as I can see. The sad thing? I worked for the Ohio Senate when the bill was passed I was actually on the Senate floor. The same day that we passed the veggie libel law, we passed a law that would forever prevent the families of workers killed from an employler's negligence from gaining any kind of legal or financial compensation. You can imagine the headlines; "Senate votes vegetable more rights than Ohio workers", etc. But they still got away with it, and it felt like the public hardly even blinked an eye. dry.gif


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angie_21
post Apr 20 2010, 09:17 PM
Post #27


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Thanks coffeebean! Another thing to add to my long long list of paperwork. I can't believe how hard it is to just spend 2 years in a different place. I can't imagine the hassle of trying to move to another country permanently. The things we take for granted when it comes to citizenship.

KW, I think I was too young for this. I do remember it happening despite the fact that I was only 8, so there was some publicity I guess. But there most certainly are hormones of some kind in our beef today. Not in pork and I don't think in chicken either, but definitely in beef. And antibiotics up the wazoo. (My dad thought he was allergic to pork for most of his adult life... turns out his penicillin sensitivity reacts to the stuff they feed pigs!) I think we are lucky in Alberta to have fairly clean meat compared to other places in North America, but other things here like canola and wheat are insanely genetically modified and sprayed within an inch of their life.

I didn't know you could libel a product lol.. although maybe it's the producers who you can't libel? And not being allowed to advertise that you're BGH-free? My mind is boggled. Sorry I can't help you out. but if anyone else knows the answers to you questions I am really interested to know too. I've started being much more careful about the products I buy and I've noticed there seems to be a lot more antibiotic-free, hormone-free, and organic stuff on the shelves recently.
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koffeewitch
post Apr 20 2010, 01:03 PM
Post #28


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Does anyone happen to remember the scuttlebutt in Canada around 1991 or so, when select scientists and officials decided to take a stand against the usual trend of following the FDA that resulted in Canada's ban on BGH?? (I know I'm really showing my age here with this question). We (in the US) STILL have bovine growth hormones and for the longest time our organic companies could not advertise being BGH-free. (It's still illegal in Ohio to libel Ohio produce, BTW). Anyway, can anyone who remembers this sort of tell me about the public reaction during this time? I've found all the old news clips and interviews, I guess I'm looking for this story from the POV of the average citizen... Did it get a decent amount of press? Was there a lot of citizen advocacy that led to this ban?


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coffeebean
post Apr 7 2010, 07:56 AM
Post #29


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Just a note to Angie - I too lived and studied in the states for a while. Prior to leaving to study, it was important to let my province know that I was leaving for an extended period of time (longer than they permit without canceling provincial coverage - I think it was more than 165 days consecutively) so that they did not cancel my provinicial coverage. They were more than willing to not let it lapse so long as I provided them with a letter from my school letting them know that I was a student and the period of time I would be gone. They were sure to let me know that if they find out that you are out of country for more than the permitted time and you have not let them know, they can cancel your provincial coverage and you must wait three months after returning to the country before you get it back. That means that when you come back for visits, even with your partner's coverage, you cannot easily visit your own doctor here.

It may be different from province to province but probably worth looking into.
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koffeewitch
post Apr 2 2010, 01:05 PM
Post #30


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Yep, welcome to paying near $1000 for health insurance that won't cover jackshit. My BF was on a program like that and we HATED it and ended up with $$$$$$ of medical bills that the insurance was supposed to pay, but didn't. Now we're both on Molina (medicaid) and it's by far the best insurance coverage we've ever had. Give me some more of that socialized medicine. Medicine for profit seems to be a "pay the insurance, but don't dare file a claim" plan. Good Luck angie21; and keep praying you just don't get sick. That's pretty much everybody's plan down here. (You guys really should here US citizens bitching about the terrible things they've "heard" about Canada's health care system)!


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angie_21
post Apr 2 2010, 12:02 PM
Post #31


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I am kinda late to the healthcare discussion, but planning on moving to the US for up to 3 years I have learned a lot already, and I can't believe how ridiculous it is down there. When I was a grad student here in Alberta, my student comprehensive coverage cost me $350 a year, and included prescriptions, dental and up to $150 every 2 years for eye care. Alberta healthcare coverage was $44 per month but as of a couple years ago, is now FREE. As in, I can walk into any clinic, any hospital, go to almost any GP in the province, and not pay a cent.

To get student healthcare at the school I've applied to, it's $950 per year with up to $200 deductible on actually using the coverage. And it's kind of limited, in that you get the deductible waived if you go to the campus clinic, so less choice there. I am probably going to purchase travel insurance from my Blue Cross back home instead, but because I am on my partner's benfits, I am covered for any major emergency while in the US anyways, it's only comprehensive I wouldn't be covered for. BUT all this fuss about how healthcare is now going to be mandatory, well, I can't even go to the university without providing proof of comprehensive coverage, so what kind of freedom is that? Did I mention this school is in freakin' Texas?

Anyways, I don't see how anyone can argue with those numbers. Private healthcare seems to me to be much cheaper in Canada simply because the private insurer doesn't have to pay for the majority of my healthcare, the province does, so their costs are much lower. And if my taxes are saving people with less means from dying because they can't afford insurance, I would have to be really selfish to complain about that, wouldn't I?

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pepper
post Mar 31 2010, 02:45 PM
Post #32







I heard on CBC this morning that the gov't here spent 7 mil on supporting the hunt which after all that only brought in 1 mil in revenue. WTF. Coulda saved us 6 million dollars and some ugly world publicity while giving those who use the hunt for profit a little something more to go on. So stupid.

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koffeewitch
post Mar 31 2010, 02:31 PM
Post #33


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http://www.humanesociety.org/seriouslycanada/

For animal lovers: this is to petition the Canadian government to stop the baby seal hunt. (The video at this site is not at all graphic/violent, so don't fear to watch it).


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ketto
post Dec 9 2009, 11:00 AM
Post #34


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Koffee, I neglected to mention things like physio as well. I had a long term sports injury and just went to the walk-in sports injury clinic to get a referral to a physio. The walk-in appt is free and the physio was covered up to $500 a year through my dad's insurance. I could choose whatever physio to go to.

And in terms of choice, I think we have a lot. I saw 5 doctors over the last 8 years trying to find someone I considered good. Now I see a woman that I love and who is by far the best doctor I have ever had. So long as a doctor is accepting patients, you have the option to see them. And two years ago when I had a severe ear infection, I got a referral to see a ear, throat, and nose specialist. I have never had to pay to see any of these people. I have an endocrinologist for my diabetes who I see every 4 months. Blood tests and visits, no pay. So maybe I'm creeping closer to an 8 or so, but I still think more basics should be more widely covered.


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koffeewitch
post Dec 9 2009, 08:56 AM
Post #35


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This is one of my all time fave threads here, I always learn so many things. I thought that most Canadians would have a positive opinion of their healthcare, but honestly your satisfaction levels are even higher than I had anticipated. See, I have campaigned for years for a system similar to yours...again and again I hear all kinds of craziness "about Canadians having no choices" and having to go untreated. In my research there has been no indication of Canadians going untreated for major illnesses. I think that too many folks in the U.S. hear things from right-wing pundits and go around talking through their arses. To be specific, I have heard that if a young person in Canada gets a disease that is generally only seen in older people (something rare, i.e.) they go untreated.

Even if that WERE true, it would be better than what we have here. My partner had Blue Cross and SHield (supposedly a good plan) and we had to pay $50 for most doctor visits, and we have thousands of dollars in debt right now for tests ordered by his primary doctor that were "supposed" to be covered. SO many of us go bankrupt because of medical bills. And so many of us have nothing (about 1 in 5 people have no health insurance here. The option for them is just not to get sick.

And girl logic, don't even get me STARTED on the childbirth stats for the U.S. or the way it is done here in general. While maternity wards have improved drastically over the last decades, they still have a long , long way to go. Our hospitals are forced to take contributions from the big formula companies in trade for shoving free formula down the throats of every new born babe no matter how determined the mother is to breastfeed. Everybody goes home with free cases of SImilac...no wonder our breastfeeding rates are so low here.

In all honesty, your health care sounds far, far, better than anything I will see in my lifetime. I have a hard time even imagining what it would be like not to have to wait to schedule med. appointments until I have money, etc. or to just go to the doctor when I'm sick and not worry about what will be covered and how many thousands of dollars I might owe. The fact that alternative treatments are affordable for you is really the icing on the cake. So much for everyone's theory that I would learn ":the horrible truth" about Canada if I spoke to real Canadians, huh? smile.gif


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ChingusKhan
post Dec 8 2009, 05:40 PM
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QUOTE(koffeewitch @ Dec 8 2009, 08:52 AM) *
On a scale of 1 to 10, how do you feel about your health insurance/health care. Let's say that a "1" would mean, "I can't afford any treatment at all and I don't buy meds even when I desperately need them," and a "10" would be "I have no problems getting the excellent health care and meds I need AND I can even chose alternative treatments or take part in preventative practices without any unreasonable cost out of pocket."

In the U.S. we are always arguing about Canada's health care system and since we are not Canadians we are pretty much talking out of our asses. I would like to hear what actual Canadians have to say.


I'm pretty much at 9 or 10. My wife and I see the same Dr. we've seen for years and our kids have a doc in our community. Never had a real problem getting in to see either of them and, aside for $20.00 per year for my 'flu shot, never had to pull out the chequebook for a visit.

We occasionally see a chiropractor, a massage therapist and, every once and while, a physiotherapist. (A bit of a week-end warrior, I am, and have paid, physically, for my follies.) Physio and chiro are both covered so my out of pocket is around $25.00 per visit.

We're all pretty healthy, with no chronic health issues. That said, my son is 10. And any of you with 10 year old boys know that emergency room visits are a fact of life. He's crashed his bike, fell off his skateboard, out of a tree, jumped off the roof of our house (Don't ask.) and all manner of other 10 year-old boy bang-ups. Never had to pay a dime to see the emergency room doc, never had to worry about what hospital to take him to.

My wife has great pharma coverage at her work and we don't pay for any meds. I had a health crisis about 4 years ago - my midlife meltdown - and my therapy and meds were completely covered by my wife's plan and by Health Canada.

Healthcare is something our neighbors to the south really need to fix. It's a real, real problem down there. Costs are astronomic - the highest per capita in the OECD - and half the population has no coverage.

Listen, this place is no utopia. Our politics are a horrid mish-mash of conflicting Federal and Provincial rights, our banking system - while safe - is staid and extremely risk averse and we, as a people, look too often to Government to solve our problems. The two things I would not trade - ever - with the US, though, are gun control and our health care. Not ever. Never.
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coffeebean
post Dec 8 2009, 01:03 PM
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As a Canadian who has also lived in the US - I stand behind our universal healthcare system - even though it has its flaws as well. As Ketto said, if I need a doctor I see one, so long as the doctor is accepting patients I can see whomever I want in whatever city I want, I don't have to worry about using the emergency room and receiving a bill afterward, hospital visits are paid by taxes, having a baby does not mean you or your employer pay thousands to a hospital etc. There is a basic level of care provided in Canada that I believe no one should be denied.

While in the US, although I had insurance through an HMO, I was always afraid of getting sick, got tired of calling my insurance company before I visited a doctor to see if what I wanted to check out was covered, dropping 20 bucks on a copay just to walk into the doctor's office or to get a prescription renewed. Honestly, the stress regarding the health care system was part of the reason I wanted to move back to Canada....and I am not even a sickly person! Also, while in the US I worked with many students who after not having appropriate health care coverage and getting sick had their lives change - I mean medical bills that cut into their tuition payments, living expenses, food allowances, and sometimes even their ability to finish school. To me that was just scary stuff!

I think the myth that permeates the US about the Canadian system is that we 'don't have control' and 'don't have a say' but in fact, in this system in Canada I feel as though I have more of a say about which doctors I see and when and for what purpose....at least for basic services which is primarily what I use.

This post has been edited by coffeebean: Dec 8 2009, 01:05 PM
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ketto
post Dec 8 2009, 12:10 PM
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Chingus, as a type 1 diabetic and someone who has invested thousands in my healthcare, it's a very important issue to me. I would say I'm somewhere around a 7, but that has a lot to do with the fact that I grew up in a household where one parent worked for the government and nearly all my meds were covered. I take part in Pharmacare, a provincial drug benefit program:

QUOTE
Pharmacare is a drug benefit program for any Manitoban, regardless of age, whose income is seriously affected by high prescription drug costs.

Pharmacare coverage is based on both your total family income and the amount you pay for eligible prescription drugs. Each year you are required to pay a portion of the cost of your eligible prescription drugs. This amount will be your annual Pharmacare deductible. Pharmacare sets your deductible based on your annual family income.

You qualify if you meet all of the following criteria:

* You are eligible for Manitoba Health coverage.
* Your prescriptions are not paid through other provincial or federal programs.
* Your prescription costs are not covered by a private drug insurance program.
* Your eligible prescription drug costs exceed your Pharmacare deductible.


Since was a student the last couple of years, my deductible was only $100. Diabetes is a very expensive disease but without insulin I would die. When I was 13 I had a really hard time controlling my overnight bloodsugars and was getting pretty sick. I switched to an insulin pump and it has been a saviour. My dad's insurance covered 80% of my pump, but the total cost is a whopping $7000, plus monthly supplies. I've moved out of my parents, but so I can get a new pump in October, I haven't changed my address officially because I need to be covered under my dad's insurance to pay for it.

I'm so thankful I have access to all the medications I currently need at pretty much zero cost, but there's also a big gap in our healthcare. I support the idea of a National Catastrophic Drug Plan that would ensure no Canadian would pay more than 3% of their income. I have it pretty good, I'm really privileged in regards to my healthcare but I know folks in the East Coast who pay $3000 a month just to survive. That's completely unacceptable to me.

On the other hand, I grew up not even realizing that in other countries you have to PAY to see a doctor. I never have to wonder if I can afford a doctor or hospital visit. When I was diagnosed with diabetes and stayed in the hospital for a week, my parents didn't have to worry about paying any hospital bills. My parents had 3 kids and they didn't have to pay to give birth in a hospital. Things like these are easily taken for granted in Canada and I don't think enough people realize how lucky we really are.


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girl_logic
post Dec 8 2009, 12:01 PM
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It's tricky koffeewitch, because most of us likewise don't have anything to compare it to if we've never lived anywhere else.

I'm always inclined to defend our health care system though. Just looking at the number of mothers who die in childbirth in the states versus here is a good barometer for me. There are still treatments I wouldn't be able to afford without the health insurance I pay for through my work, but I don't take for granted my ability to see a my choice of GP and get particular tests done whenever I want or need them.


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koffeewitch
post Dec 8 2009, 11:52 AM
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Thanks Chingus, you are, as always, a wealth of great info.

Another one for the Canadians:

On a scale of 1 to 10, how do you feel about your health insurance/health care. Let's say that a "1" would mean, "I can't afford any treatment at all and I don't buy meds even when I desperately need them," and a "10" would be "I have no problems getting the excellent health care and meds I need AND I can even chose alternative treatments or take part in preventative practices without any unreasonable cost out of pocket."

In the U.S. we are always arguing about Canada's health care system and since we are not Canadians we are pretty much talking out of our asses. I would like to hear what actual Canadians have to say.


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