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> barefoot, precocious, and in the kitchen
auralpoison
post Oct 18 2010, 11:00 AM
Post #41


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QUOTE(damona @ Oct 18 2010, 11:13 AM) *
. . . except i use canned chicken . . .


Canned chicken or chicken in a can? laugh.gif


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damona
post Oct 18 2010, 10:13 AM
Post #42


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*bows* thank you, persi. laugh.gif as much work as it is, i love canning. especially since i get to hang with bgp and have a girls weekend while we work!

kitten, that sounds yummy with the peach salsa smile.gif i do something similar in my rice cooker... except i use canned chicken, spicy salsa, and black beans. sometimes i toss in frozen or canned corn, too. so not all that similar, i guess!

i got creative in my kitchen the other day... put a 2 1/2 pound boneless pork roast in the crock pot, added 2 sliced sweet onions, 2 chopped tart apples, 3 cups water, a cup and a half of apple cider, a bay leaf, 1/4 tsp rosemary, 1/2 tsp marjoram, a bit of salt and black pepper, and a sprinkle of powdered ginger. cover and cook on low 6-8 hours. i actually did mine overnight, but we like our meats falling apart. i served it over boiled potatoes. it was yum and a half. it smelled beyond amazing while it was cooking, too.




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kittenb
post Oct 15 2010, 11:10 AM
Post #43


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Last night I made a very yummy slow cooker meal that I wanted to share:

5-6 frozen chicken breasts
16 oz of salsa (I used peach but I don't like spicy salsas)
1 pkg of taco seasoning
1 cup dry brown rice
2 1/4 cups of water

Cook on slow cooker for 5-6 hours on high (I went 6 & my chicken was a little dry so less time might be better.) When it was all done I stirred in 1 cup of shredded chedder/colby jack cheeese. Very flavorful and really simple. Enjoy!


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Persiflager
post Oct 11 2010, 01:55 AM
Post #44


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Bravo damona!


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damona
post Oct 10 2010, 09:21 PM
Post #45


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spent all of last weekend with BGP canning apples and tomatoes in various forms (tho not combinations lol). we did: 8 qts and 4 pts of cinnamon apple slices, a dozen pts of brandied apple rings, six 12oz jars of brandied apple syrup, 16 half pint jars of apple butter, 22 half pint jars of apple-maple jam, 14 pts of plain tomato sauce, and 8 pts of diced tomatoes with green peppers, onions, and garlic. it was a very long weekend. we worked til 4am friday and saturday. we decided to skip the ketchup, even though we had about 100 pounds of tomatoes, those 22 pts were all of them! next year, BGP is expanding her garden, and hopefully, i'll be able to plant at least 1 or 2 tomato plants in pots.

my mom has also made: yellow squash pickles, dilled green beans, and green tomato pickles, along with a few jars each of a bunch of other stuff like dill pickles and sweet pickles and various tomato things. she also made a strawberry-rhubarb sauce that she did in freezer containers back in may that is delish over ice cream.


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koffeewitch
post Sep 24 2010, 04:48 PM
Post #46


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Persi: Fuckin' Hell Yeah. It's enviromental feminists who are mostly bringing back the whole foods/slow foods movement and giving corporate McGmOs the boot out of our kitchens. It's money-grubbing corporations and people like Poppy Cannon who ruined home cooking (along with a shitty economy).

Anyway, after a decade of trying I FINALLY LEARNED TO MAKE DECENT INDIAN FOOD! I can't even get over it; I'm living on aloo mattar and kheer 4 days out of 7. For some reason, my attempts from reading cookbooks just never tasted right. And then I discovered Manjala's Vegetarian Indian Cooking site where she SHOWS you how to do it in these 8 minute videos and everything finally clicked. Huzzah!! If you dig on Indian food, you really should check Manjala out...once somebody shows you how to do it, it all makes sense, and never again will you make something with too much cumin or too little coriander, etc.

Now, if I could master Ethiopian food, I'd be satisfied for life...


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Persiflager
post Sep 24 2010, 05:18 AM
Post #47


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Yesterday's lunch: cold sausages (mixtures of chunky bacon and apple), sun-dried tomatoes, cous cous made with chicken stock, and a handful of spinach. Yum!

I am sorely envious of the canning, ketto!

Damona, I probably spend around $250 a month, but that's just for me and I eat out a lot.

Did anyone see the Rosie Prince article in the Daily Fail about how feminism ruined home cooking and made all out children fat? It's too silly to get angry about (though I was annoyed to see her given air time on Radio 4 this morning, and to see the appointed feminist mostly agreeing with her). It did make me laugh because the best cooks among the women I know are all raving feminists!


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ketto
post Sep 23 2010, 07:19 PM
Post #48


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Spaghetti squash is out here and I loooooooove spaghetti squash. I don't like it as a sub for noodles because...it doesn't taste anything like noodles. My favourite thing to do is cook it up, remove the strands, and mix it with extra virgin olive oil, feta cheese, spinach, chopped green beans, and kalamata olives.

I canned some apple sauce for the first time a few days ago and it was awesome. I'm going to make a whole bunch this weekend.


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auralpoison
post Sep 23 2010, 11:13 AM
Post #49


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I cannot stand sweet potatoes. I have tried them so many different ways over the years & the only way I can stomach them are the rare extra extra extra crispy/salty frites or in a homemade sweet potato pie. I make a kick ass sweet potato pie.


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damona
post Sep 22 2010, 01:43 PM
Post #50


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ketto, you made me remember my squash with maple and pecans recipe. thank you! the leftover-potato-mash sounds delicious, too. i boiled a big pot of potatoes last night and i think that will be on the menu in a couple hours...

syb, i always forget about making mashed sweet potatoes. yum!

i picked up a couple of cans of mexican soda at the big store in the city that i got to go to the other night (small town usa here has little variety.) the champagne cola flavor tastes nothing like champagne, it kind of reminds me of chewing bubblicious while drinking a coke. the coconut flavour was rather like drinking a bottle of suntan oil. not pleasant. i should have just grabbed a couple bottles of jarritos.

we also got a couple boxes of these korean noodles (ramen type) that have the instructions printed on them in russian and french. The Boy can read russian and i can read french so we managed to figure out how to make them and they were delicious.


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sybarite
post Sep 18 2010, 02:14 PM
Post #51


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I mash sweet potatoes by baking them in the oven first then when they're soft enough I just scoop them out into a big bowl. I roast some garlic at the same time and put that in along with a little butter or olive oil and some thyme.
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ketto
post Sep 17 2010, 09:44 PM
Post #52


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I just boil up a bunch of potatoes whole (with skins because we love them in this house) for about 30 minutes, drain, add 1 clove pressed garlic, 1-2 tbsp butter depending on how many potatoes, and I usually do a mix of milk and/or whipping cream and/or buttermilk and/or sour cream - enough to get it to the consistency I like.

To make things more interesting I'll often bake 1/2 a squash at 375 (any kind - buttercup, butternut, acorn, pumpkin, etc) for about 30 minutes and mash it in with the potatoes. If I have sweet potatoes, parsnips, or carrots I'll roast them at 375 for 20-30 minutes and mash them in too. And salt and pepper to taste. I always add the garlic first, and after everything is mashed I put the heat on low for about 10 minutes and let the garlic cook a bit. It gives it a really nice more mellow taste.

So I don't really have an exact recipe, more of a whatever is in the pantry thing.

I also like to take 2-3 cups of leftover potatoes and mix it with 1/4-1/2 of an onion, a can of chickpeas or kidney beans, 4-5 cups of veggie broth, salt, pepper, basil, parsley, let it cook for 20 minutes, and then I mash it with a potato masher. It's sooooo nice. I make it a lot when I'm sick.


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pepper
post Sep 17 2010, 09:28 PM
Post #53







I hear you sister, my little man can pack it in at the table man! The girl eats like a bird and I can take it or leave it so it's mostly him. Same with laundry, mostly him. Sigh. At least he's old enough to help out around the house now, saving grace that.
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damona
post Sep 17 2010, 03:03 PM
Post #54


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ketto, i had a tooth yanked last night. can you share some of your mash recipes? i feel like i've been punched in the face and it's nearly impossible to chew. between that and The Mr's surgery, my inspiration is at an all time low right now.

pepper, i don't buy juice and stuff, either, usually, and the hot pockets and such are an aberration for just this month. usually i make everything from scratch, too. especially since we do all the gfcf stuff, and that stuff is expensive.

i've got myself, The Mr, 4 boys ages 11-5 and, about half the time, The Boy. so i'm feeding 6 guys lol and if anyone thinks that the little ones eat less, come over for dinner sometime! i stretched a pound of hamburger with an onion, a big can of red beans and a big can of diced tomatoes last night, for tacos. there was just enough leftovers for the 2 little boys to have some with chips as "nachos" after school. and i didn't even eat any of it!


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ketto
post Sep 16 2010, 03:44 PM
Post #55


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Damona, my boyfriend and I have a $100 a week food budget for the 2 of us, so $400-500 a month because sometimes we need extras. I don't eat much processed food because I have GI issues and neither of us likes it much anyway. Because it's just the two of us and I like to cook as fresh as possible, I probably hit up the market for fruits and veggies 1-3 times a week and we do a bigger shopping trip at costco 1-2 a month. In the winter we got organic produce in a box delivered once a week for $30. It's a bit more expensive but it's a fun way to experiment because I get foods I would never normally buy. The newsletter often tells a bit about where the food is coming from or what farms, etc.

I've been going nuts on mashes lately. A base of dirty mashed potatoes with garlic, squash, carrots, sweet potato, parsnip, etc...basicaly whatever good root veggies I have lying around. I got some local garlic this weekend and it was my first time ever using it. It's got a more earthy flavour but I really like it - different but hard to explain how. I'm hoping I can snag a bunch more. I work on the day most of the farmers markets happen here so I don't get to go as often as I'd like.


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pepper
post Sep 16 2010, 02:19 PM
Post #56







After that crock kraut horror I've been too chickenshit to wild ferment anything so far. I like the water valve on this pickler/fermenter, it's fool proof. I'll pick that book up for the wine and beer info though, that seems so complicated and freaky, I'd love a simplified version.

Damona, I spend about $100/wk for myself and the 2 kids but some of it ends up in the compost. I can only get to the grocery store once a week or so and I tend to overbuy just in case I'll need something.
We are vegetarian and eat mostly fresh fruits and veg, I cook my own beans from dried, bake whatever sweets, bisquits etc we eat and I don't buy snacky foods, coffee, tea, juice, etc. That may account for some of the price difference. I don't have to feed a man either, that's probably the rest of it laugh.gif .

Oh, and I'm not including wine or chocolate but those are neccessities for sanity, not food wink.gif .




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damona
post Sep 15 2010, 04:51 PM
Post #57


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omg, pepper, i want. want want want want want. laugh.gif i was going to try to do some fermented stuff this year, but it's been one crisis after another around here, all summer, and i just never quite got to it. next summer, i swear it!

koffee, i haven't read that one yet, but i did read "the revolution will not be microwaved" by sandor ellix katz. that book is absolutely fascinating to me.

i read that it takes 45 pounds of fresh tomatoes to make 7 quarts of tomato sauce. i must have a hundred pounds in my freezer, and there are another 20 huge (double fist sized or even bigger) tomatoes ripening on my windowsill, and dozens more still in the garden. i'm going to have enough tomato sauce for an army. or my family. same difference laugh.gif

i've spent nearly $300 on groceries in the last 2 days. my freezer and pantry and fridge were all just about empty when i finally got the money to go shopping. i have to admit, this time i got a lot of convenience food like corn dogs and hot pockets and such, which i usually don't get. The Mr had surgery on his hand this morning, though, and i needed to have stuff that he can easily warm up and eat one handed for the next week or 2.

i'm curious now... what does everyone here spend on groceries, on average? i spend about $700 a month at grocery stores, and about another $75-$100 a month at the farmers market.


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ketto
post Sep 15 2010, 03:54 PM
Post #58


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I'm about to start pickling for the first time (although I'm not hot-water canning because this particular recipe doesn't have enough vinegar so they'll be fridged). My mom mixed together a couple of my Ukrainian grandmothers recipes and came up with amazing pickles. Paperboy tried them for the first time last week and said they are hands down the best pickles he's ever had in his life. My cousin did some really delicious carrots and green beans so I'm going to get her recipe and try and do them in the next couple of weeks too.

I want to properly can something ASAP but my mom's recipe is just too damn good. I'm looking around at Tigressinapickle and Tigressinajam to get some idea's. This site is also a great resource: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/publications_usda.html


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koffeewitch
post Sep 14 2010, 12:41 PM
Post #59


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Have you guys read Wild Fermentaion by Sandor Katz??? OMG it is freakin' fascinating whether you intend to use Katz's recipes or not.
And what's super cool (atleast to me) is that it is all veg/vegan. Even teaches you to make all the traditional dairy yogurts, kefirs, etc. with any vegan substitute.

Katz's approach is very much for the amatuer folks...no fancy equipment, no high-tech instructions. As he points out, people have been making fermented foods for thousands of years without sterile kitchens and expensive gadgetry. His beer-wine making instructions are a great relief compared to some of the uptight, precision-oriented instructions I've seen other places. Tell me you're not just dying to make a good Ethiopian T'ej??


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pepper
post Sep 14 2010, 07:04 AM
Post #60







Well, it came with a little recipe book and I get the occasional email with a new one. Last time it was how to pickle tender lettuces, apparently they come out still sort of crispy but tangy with fermented goodness. Makes nice sides or salad toppers though I find myself just eating dishes of it, it's very addictive. There's even a recipe for pickled ginger, wonder if you meaties could do a horseradish batch for roast beast and such? You can use the set up with a smaller jar that the 2 litre one it comes with too.
Kim Chi, button mushrooms, parsnips, that lettuce, and a jar of shredded carrot are all on my list. I've only ever had a fail one time when I think the temperature in the kitchen was off. Seriously, this thing makes pickling/fermenting DEAD easy! Much better than the time my sister and I ended up with an entire crock of stank cabbage. Oh Maude, the whole house had to be aired out for DAYS! Ha ha ha laugh.gif

One tip from the traditional pickling crowd is to use an oak leaf (or variation, google for a list) that is high in tannins to keep pickled cukes crisp. Mine turned out fine without that but I'll give it a go next summer just to see.
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