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> When The Food You Love Hates You
turbojenn
post Sep 28 2006, 07:10 AM
Post #41


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Ooooh, chacha, I meant to look this thread up earlier, but I took your advice, and I bought some organic, completely grassfed, no-hormone butter and chocolate milk at the farmers market last week - and I didn't have a problem with either! And the butter is sooooo good, unlike any other butter I've had - much cleaner and earthy tasting - YUM. 'course, it was $15 for 8 oz of butter, but it was worth it, and I'm not going to go slathering it on everything...just a dab here and there. dee-licious.

polly, I pretty much just make my own burritos these days...I miss a good burrito from a restaurant, but I love getting fresh corn tortillas, still warm from the factory, and filling them with homeade charro beans, avocado, tomato and onion. mmmmm. I need to do that sometime very soon.
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chachaheels
post Sep 28 2006, 06:59 AM
Post #42


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First: all ailments and diseases are psychosomatic. Psychosomatic does not equal "unreal" or "false". Psychosomatic means that the mind is also involved in the ailment along with the physical body, both in a dynamic, cause and effect way. What you're experiencing is very real--you're lucky you have such a strong sense of what to avoid as a food.

Following that, it could be that you are reacting to the oil content, the refined flour content, and the "natural flavouring/aroma (buttery!)" or "spices" or otherwise named MSG content in the flour tortillas.

Isn't there anyone else around who makes delicious burritos without using these kinds of white flour tortillas where you live? Your body desperately wants you to stop going to Taco Bell.


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pollystyrene
post Sep 27 2006, 09:57 PM
Post #43


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I kinda forgot about this thread, and there was something I wanted to ask. As far as I know, I'm not really allergic/sensitive to any food (except one.) I get a little unpleasantly bloaty if I drink too much milk, but that's about it.

However, there's one food that does tend to set me off, and I can't figure out why. For the past few years, I have not been able to eat flour tortillas. The smell alone makes me feel ill, and I get really nauseated if I eat one- nothing really happens, but my stomach gets all churny and I just feel sick all over. I am fine with corn tortillas, I'm so-so with wheat tortillas and only a little better with tortillas that are green (are they supposed to be spinach flavored or something?) I have no reaction to any other wheat/baked products, but for some reason, that buttery smell/taste just gets to me, and I don't think it's psychosomatic- I really feel crappy after i eat them.

I mostly avoid them, but sometimes I get this crazy craving for Taco Bell and corn tortillas aren't an option there.

Any ideas what I could be sensitive to, and why it's only when in flour tortilla form? It makes me sad because I miss burritos! No burrito-sized corn tortillas sad.gif


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pepper
post Sep 27 2006, 08:33 PM
Post #44







has anyone read the "cleanse and purify thyself" book? any comments?
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ohmaude
post Sep 27 2006, 07:40 PM
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Ok, I'ma bumping this.

Since I gave up wheat three weeks ago I have become a changed lady. People who barely know me and don't know that I wasn't feeling well are all like, "Wow. You are looking so much better, you were pale and seemed exhausted. Now you are like your old self, what was happening?" Mind you that is a rude thing to point out, but I think it illustrates just how bad off my poor body was. I can't believe how great I feel now, and I can't believe I let myself go so long feeling so very ill.

So, for those of you who are with me on the no wheat thing, I need some help. I have been nervous about eating out since I eliminated wheat, (duh) and I was wondering if there were any foods that you were like, "Wha? There's wheat in that?" Whether it is a type of cuisine, etc. Which ones suprised you?

So far, I have realized how many people use wheat-based soy sauce....
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ohmaude
post Sep 11 2006, 05:05 PM
Post #46


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QUOTE(turbojenn @ Sep 9 2006, 09:56 PM) *

Congrats on starting to make some changes in how you eat!! For the aching, I'd recommend taking epsom salt baths daily - it'll help with the detoxing, *and* a nice hot bath always feels good. I put about 2lb in every bath, then just rinse off afterward.

Hopefully your headache will go away soon, and you'll start to feel your body appreciate the changes you're making. I lost a lot of weight when I made my initial diet change - about 60lb...I was exercising a lot too, which definitely helped. But mostly, it was just because I cut dairy, wheat, eggs and sugar from my diet...and that was alot of my caloric intake. So switching that up to a purely whole foods diet just let the weight melt off.

Now, 5 years later, I've put 25lb of it back on, but I'm cool with that, since now I don't have to be so orthodox about my eating, since I'm managing the overall stress on my body better, I can have some wheat or a sweet treat every few days, and not have a problem. Its now just about balance, and that works for me.



Thanks Turbo, I have been taking the epsom salt baths before bed. They are fantastic. The ND gave me some probiotics and gut repair stuff today. Mmm....happy gut flora.
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chachaheels
post Sep 11 2006, 02:22 AM
Post #47


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Well, one thing I would suggest right off the bat is the addition of some digestive enzymes to your diet to help you deal with the food you're eating (that bloating and gassiness? means you're not absorbing nutrients from your food...and you should be absorbing them).

Another suggestion I would make is to keep the dairy in, raise the quality of the dairy foods you eat (organic and full fat is good--raw dairy with full fat is better, but that's really tough to find in some places; low fat dairy is not just useless in my opinion, it's harmful and sucks nutrients out of our bodies so it's best left in the store) and add lacto-fermented foods to your diet, such as yogurt. I would also heartily suggest using lemon juice or whey (from your good quality yogurt) to soak all your whole grains and beans in, so that the phytates in them can be removed and you can digest all their nutrients without bloating or gas. Butter is a really important food if you're concerned with actually using the nutrients in your food, so buy the best quality you can (raw if possible, if not, organic butter will do). You should see a huge improvement in the bloating and gassiness just from these small changes alone. If you've made the changes to the dairy products, and the problems still persist, then at that point I would think about removing the dairy from the diet.

Watch out for soy foods, unless they are organic, non-gmo, and fermented (tofu, tempeh, miso, and tamari sauce). Soy is snuck into all kinds of foods--baked goods, fruit juices, condiments and processed foods of every stripe; cereals, soups, all the low fat dairy on the market--you name it. Soy is loaded with phytic acid which actually hinders all nutrient absorption, so it may be a big reason as to why you're suffering the symptoms you have. Any label featuring the words "hydrolyzed vegetable protein" contains soy, in the form of MSG; so many foods contain these ingredients most of us eat soy without knowing and without choosing to do so. Many foods include soy yet their manufacturers don't have to list the soy protein added in their ingredient listings (orange juice is one example, skim milk is another). These foods are best avoided.


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johanna
post Sep 10 2006, 08:37 PM
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Hey everyone!

I'm in the process of making significant changes to my diet. I eat healthy, generally, but I'm almost always bloated (to the point that it's painful and my pants feel too tight and I am an expert at covertly passing gas. Or at least I hope I am.)

I know I have a really bad sugar addiction. If I eat a peice of cake for a party, for the next 3 days it is a living hell trying to stop the cravings. I will eat an enormous amount of food because I keep feeling hungry, but not until I eat something sweet will it stop. These cravings are thousands of times stronger than smoking cravings for me (I quit smoking a few years ago!). Right now, I'm getting harder on myself to not have any sweets in the first place. I used to have dessert whenever I'd go to my parents' place, but now I'm only going to have desert on special occasions (like Christmas, or a birthday), so like once a month or something.

I'm motivated to do that now because I'm worried that I have insulin resistance. I went to a nutritionist a few years ago and she said it sounded like I do, and this is very serious since it can lead to Type 2 diabetes. Not cool. She also said it sounded like I have IBS since I get diahrea often (especially after eating high-sugar foods). If I eat a lot of fibre and cut the crap foods out of my diet, this tends not to be an issue.

Anyway, you get the idea, my digestive system is not ideal. I gain weight only in my abdomen, so the bloating factor really accentuates this!

I was thinking of cutting out dairy from my diet to see if this improves how I feel. I'm posting here because I want to talk with other people and get suggestions on other possible causes / solutions (I don't have the money for a nutritionist now, and my doctor is a conservative, backward, doesn't-believe-in-nutritionists, take-a-pill-instead kinda guy.)

Right now I am focusing on eating a lot of vegetables every day, eating protein with every meal, but from leaner sources (I lift weights and train at a martial arts academy so this is important). I already stick with whole grains, generally don't eat bread, don't add sugar to meals when cooking and don't drink any milk. I do eat a lot of yogurt and some cheese though. I eat a decent amount of fruits too. Sometimes I drink coffee, but not every day.

Anyway, I still feel bloated when I eat like this, so please let me know if you can help me with your suggestions!

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turbojenn
post Sep 9 2006, 03:39 PM
Post #49


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Congrats on starting to make some changes in how you eat!! For the aching, I'd recommend taking epsom salt baths daily - it'll help with the detoxing, *and* a nice hot bath always feels good. I put about 2lb in every bath, then just rinse off afterward.

Hopefully your headache will go away soon, and you'll start to feel your body appreciate the changes you're making. I lost a lot of weight when I made my initial diet change - about 60lb...I was exercising a lot too, which definitely helped. But mostly, it was just because I cut dairy, wheat, eggs and sugar from my diet...and that was alot of my caloric intake. So switching that up to a purely whole foods diet just let the weight melt off.

Now, 5 years later, I've put 25lb of it back on, but I'm cool with that, since now I don't have to be so orthodox about my eating, since I'm managing the overall stress on my body better, I can have some wheat or a sweet treat every few days, and not have a problem. Its now just about balance, and that works for me.
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ohmaude
post Sep 9 2006, 01:32 PM
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Thanks for the links cha-cha.

I have been officially wheat-free since Tuesday, and am experiencing what must be the detox and withdrawal symptoms.

I have had a headache since yesterday and my muscles just ACHE like I took a beating. sad.gif This is so weird. From what I hear, after this I should start feeling much better. I'm wondering if some of the weight I have gained in the past year will come off.

I will be going into the clinic on Monday to make sure I'm doing everything I can to heal up.
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chachaheels
post Sep 7 2006, 10:38 AM
Post #51


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ohmaude, I found this link with a slew of recipes for those who are going without wheat and gluten foods:

http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/g...luten-free.html

The site, if you want to poke around in there, has terrific suggestions for supporting the body so that it becomes healthy again--and the best nutrition research around. I thought these recipes looked interesting and easy to pull together, so enjoy.



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ohmaude
post Sep 6 2006, 08:29 PM
Post #52


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Huh. I am an immunologist (for wildlife biology but I am well versed in general immunology) and I have never heard of theories/research that poorly processed wheat or other foods results in removing nutrients in the body which then results in an immune response. But that is a little out of what I do research in, so who knows.

I tended to avoid processed wheat before, the pasta I ate was whole wheat (which I know is partially processed) but mainly I ate whole grains.

Thanks for the advice, I will keep my eye out for gluten free breads (which don't contain any wheat), or bananas. heh. And talk to my doctor (which is a woman, and not homeopathic, but a naturopath)
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chachaheels
post Sep 6 2006, 05:30 PM
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I think there are some alternatives others can suggest--you can actually buy some gluten free breads in various places (likely if you're in a larger city. I live in a pretty small town, and we have a bakery here which specializes in all kinds of gluten free foods. They also supply a lot of the restaurants in town, including some of the very expensive winery restaurants, so it's really a matter of seeking them out where you are, cause you never know).

If you are going to be treated with classical homeopathy and your doctor is well trained (just cause he teaches, doesn't mean classical homeopathy is a specialty he's studied, so really, double check) the food issues will resolve and you'll be able to eat wheat foods again, but you really should choose carefully and avoid the refined grains even when you're well as that's what causes the problems with wheat and gluten for most people. I know the "test" doesn't measure your ability to digest refined and denatured wheat: you get sensitivities and allergies to wheat because it's refined forms are practically nutrientless, and they actually repeatedly strip nutrients out of your body, which undermines you to the point where you have sensitivities and finally, allergies. Whole grains that are properly processed include all the nutrients you need to actually use and digest the grain--so you gain from it, instead of being constantly depleted by it. No need for the body to produce an immune response to the grain when that happens.

If your ND is not a classical homeopath, then you'll do well with nutritional changes and supports from supplements and botanical medicine systems he's knowledgeable about. You should only get one homeopathic remedy at a time, with one single ingredient: you take only as much of that as needed: if you get something with a long list of remedies, it's not homeopathy, and it isn't curative (in fact, it's often dangerous because it complicates your illness in a way that is extremely difficult to fix later). If that's what you're presented with, opt for the nutrition and herb treatments instead and you'll do far better.

As far as what you're eating now, the ethiopian bread's made from fermented teff, so there's no gluten in it.
Here's a list of a variety of different flours and other links from the Hospital for Sick Children's website if you want a comprehensive listing of foods and baking capability.
[url=http://]http://www.sickkids.ca/SFSNutritionResources/section.asp?s=Celiac+Disease&sID=17477&ss=Tips+for+Gluten-Free+Baking&ssID=16793,gluten free[/url],gluten free baking

Oops! Sorry about that, the link works but I can't figure out the new formatting on this board, and the link was too blahdy long.


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ohmaude
post Sep 6 2006, 04:18 PM
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QUOTE(chachaheels @ Sep 6 2006, 10:05 AM) *

Well, if your ND advises cutting that stuff out of your diet until you can digest it again with no difficulties, there are people on this thread who've got a lot of experience with that and can give you lots of suggestions.

Good luck!



Thanks chacha.

As far as my diet guess I eat a lot of vietnamese, thai and Ethiopian when I eat out. At home it's veggies, pasta (I guess no more of that), tofu sautes, soups. I used to eat a banana almost every day for breakfast. (No more of that either)

I would like to figure out how to bake without using wheat flour. Has anyone tried rice or the other types of flours? Is it possible to make breads?

We also brew our own beer here at the house, does anyone know about how barley and wheat are related?

I'm very, very lucky to live in a large city with plenty of co-ops around and asian groceries.
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chachaheels
post Sep 6 2006, 03:48 AM
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Well, if your ND advises cutting that stuff out of your diet until you can digest it again with no difficulties, there are people on this thread who've got a lot of experience with that and can give you lots of suggestions.

Good luck!


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ohmaude
post Sep 5 2006, 04:39 PM
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Well the wheat I already suspected, I had cut it out of my diet recently and when I tried it once or twice I got migraines and a very unhappy belly. But the test measures immune response, not an inability to digest wheat. Unless unprocessed wheat contains some sort of immunosuppressor or antihistmine.

Luckily, my naturopath is a professor at Bastyr. I'm going in next week to get homeopathic remedies to help my intestines repair themselves.
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chachaheels
post Sep 5 2006, 04:23 PM
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Most people have some kind of sensitivity to wheat products (they're so refined, all of them--even the ones that purport to be whole grain, that the wheat is sorely lacking in nutrients we'd need to digest them properly anyway, so it's no wonder). Other than that it doesn't sound like you've got a lot of allergies to contend with, which is good.

If your naturopath is well trained as a classical homeopath (many are, but ask to see the credentials) it's the absolute best treatment for what you have. In the meantime, it really does help to know what you need to avoid for the time being.

It's a lot easier to make suggestions for food options if you give some ideas about how you eat--has your ND asked you to keep a food journal for a number of days, just so you know your eating patterns and tendencies? It's a good way to start seeing your patterns and habits clearly. Then it's easier to make replacements or adjustments as you need them.


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ohmaude
post Sep 5 2006, 03:56 PM
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Argghh.

After suffering from years of IBD, I finally started going to a naturopath, who decided to do a food allergy blood test.

I had a IgG or IgE response (aka allergic response) to Aspargus, Bananas, Pineapples, Whole wheat, rye, Wheat Gluten and Wheat Giladin.

Any of you have experience with these food allergies?
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midgemcgrath
post Aug 22 2006, 11:29 AM
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Thanks faith! Yes, a lot going on, but I am so happy to be done my Masters now (wheeeeeeeee!!!!), and to have finally gotten a referal to a stomach specialist after lifelong digestive problems. I know it might sound funny to be excited about going to another doctor, but I have been waiting a long time for this!

About the wheat/glycemic index stuff... I've been on a gluten free diet for nine months now, so I'm on top of that, but I don't know much about the GI, so I had to do a little quick research on the web...

Apparently (as I'm sure you know), many of the non-wheat alternatives seem to be high on the GI, like rices (brown rice was 50), millet (71!), corn (70), raw oat bran (55), buckwheat (54)... that makes it kind of difficult huh? But I did find some good things: assuming you can eat gluten, whole rye bread is 40 if you are hankering for the occasional sandwich. And I know lentils aren't a grain, but maybe you could mix them with brown rice half and half or something because brown lentils were only 30.

And the winners, again if you can have gluten, pearl barley is only a 25 and you could use it in the place of rice in many ways. Maybe a barley risotto? And quinoa, 35, which is by far one of my favorite "grains" (though it's actually a seed), and has so many uses. I discovered it about a year ago, and it has been a staple for me all through this gluten-free diet. It is much more filling than rice because it is high in protein, and you can do ANYTHING with it: use it as a side dish, put it in a cold salad (like tabouli), eat it straight with pasta sauce on it, half it with some fish and make burger patties, make it into oatmeal, use it in a casserole like lasagna...I've got a lot of self-made recipes so if you like it or want to get some ideas, just let me know and i'll give you some more detailed recipes!
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chachaheels
post Aug 22 2006, 10:11 AM
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Hi Faith!

I think we're more aware of food sensitivities now for a number of reasons--environmental ones being the least important. I used to think that excessive pollution of air, water, and soil were the reasons, but I once suggested that in a class taught by a medical historian, who wasted no time pointing out to me that 200+ years ago, things were far, far more polluted and a great deal less sanitary than they are now. Sure, we have vehicle emissions fouling everything; but hundreds of years ago people burnt coal to power everything, so the air, water, and soil were blackened beyond what we could imagine. Water was fouled with run-off from farm animals and people, and there was no real way to purify it for drinking (so people drank things like wine and beer because the alcohol content at least made it safe to imbibe, and that's how they maintained their hydration). Garbage and wastes were just thrown out--not in any specialized places, and not with any kind of restriction, either. It was just very close to wherever people lived. Poor sanitation was the major cause of infectious disease--and the numbers delineating that fact did not recede until the beginning of the 20th century, when people finally stopped storing their wastes close to where they live. So the envinronmental poisons threat has been constant--we're just getting different types of poisons around us than in the past, but that matters little. It's here, but it's always been here.

What we are seeing is a drastic change in the way foods are grown and produced (from the use of longstanding agricultural breeding and growing traditions to the advent of agribusiness, on a worldwide scale); and after that, a huge and detrimental change in the types of foods we have access to (mostly over-processed, overly refined, genetically modified foods with little nutrient value) and a marketing strategy that pushes certain foods on us as "healthy" simply to satisfy an agribusiness agenda. The result is we've ended up cutting out a lot of foods our ancestors, even our most recent ancestors, relied on as part of a whole diet, which evolved over millennia, and varied only because of culture and specific environmental realities like climate and availability. We do without a lot of the staple foods we can't get anymore because they're no longer widely available: things like whole, real dairy (that hasn't been pasteurized, treated with anti-biotics or growth hormones, hasn't been "homogenized", and hasn't been doctored with dyes, dried milk content, and fake "texture"); we can't get decent lacto-fermented foods (because dairy's been pasteurized now for so long) so we miss so many of the absolutely necessary nutrients from those foods; meat products are also doctored, genetically modified, dried, coloured, what-have-you; and soils have been so nutrient depleted via the use of expensive chemical fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides that they can hardly impart rich nutrients to any thing grown on them, almost universally. On top of this, so much of what was done traditionally with food has been dismissed as silly or incongruous, but it turns out a lot of good reasoning was behind those methods of food preparation--so we've also lost a lot of knowledge, acquired through centuries of learning and observation, about exactly how to stay healthy and strong through food.

So, our diets have changed tremendously just over the last 60 to 70 years; we're eating foods the likes of which no one has seen before and we're eating diets which are shortchanging us on extremely important nutrients. The result is that our bodies are far less equipped to maintain their health naturally, or cure themselves whenever needed. Top all of that off with various other threats to health, such as overuse of anti-biotics on a world wide scale, an over-reliance on questionable medical practices like repeated vaccination, and it's no wonder allergies and sensitivities are on the rise universally. You can make the argument that we're all living longer now (which I find questionable) but it's clear we're not living well if our aging years are full of chronic disease and a growing dependency on and ever increased drug-use "therapy" that's snidely known as "disease management".

I know, you're sorry you asked.

(I'm just putting together a classroom text for a course I'm teaching this fall on holistic nutrition, so I've spent past the last couple of days obsessing choosing reference articles on exactly this issue...I apologize).

I do think, however, that avoiding environmental toxins are a good thing--and you can avoid a lot of by changing your diet! Here's a link to some excellent articles regarding specific toxins and food production:
environmental toxins and food.

Yeah, I refer people to this website alot, but I haven't found any other source of privately funded, no-strings-attached research on nutrition anywhere else.

I'm not crazy about everything he writes in his book, but Michel Montignac's "Eat Yourself Slim" has some good suggestions for low-glycemic grains. They include rices, though; not just brown rice but also basmati, red rice, and wild rice. Pasta as well--as long as you use the extruded pasta, made with hard wheats (like durham semolina) and not enriched refined white flour pastas (like the "fresh" pasta we see sitting around for weeks in stores). Buckwheat, amaranth, quinoa, spelt, millet, oatmeal...these are some grain options you can still find organically raised, stone milled or rolled, with not too much processing to rancidify the vitamin E content in each; all rich in protein.

So...if you're doing this for reasons to do with "mood", it all works a lot better if you supplement with fats as well, particularly the fats found in high quality butter, pure fish oils (like salmon, anchovy, deep/cold water fish such as herring, and high quality pure cod liver oil) and evening primrose oil. The glycemic thing works better if you're also taking C and B vitamin supplements for support as well.


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