Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: barefoot, precocious, and in the kitchen
The BUST Lounge > Forums > Absolutely Fad-ulous
Pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34
kittenb
I wanted to add a few notes to the apples I posted below:
    4 hours is enough. Anything else will make them mushy
    Leave some rolled oats out to sprinkle in late or just place on top when done (maybe.) I think it would add a nice texture.
    Leftovers make a great breakfast.
vixen_within
I made your recipe last night Kitten B it was mm mmm good. I also added some ground clove.
rubberdollz
So I got a recipe for a sourdough bread and I'm in the process of making the "starter kit." It's basically the yeast but I make it myself!!! I'm so excited to get started on this bread but I still haven't bought the loaf pans to finish it when the starter is done! How sad.

pepper
i was at a friend's place when i last visited TO and she had a copy of The Joy of Cooking in the kitchen. i commented on how i want to get a copy and she handed it to me. didja hear me? she handed over her copy like it was nuthin'. coulda scraped my face off the floor, i tell ya.
anyhow, i have about 10 recipes for rich cake and quick bread lined up, just got some pyrex bakeware and i've got plans to fill that freezer right up! apple and pumpkin and zucchini, oh my. and ginger and carrot and pear and Pound Cake! i'm so excited.
rubberdollz
So she wasn't using it or what?!?!?! Holy crapola that is awesome though, so now you have this wonderful book with yummy breads and it's all yours!

Well my starter is still a startin' and I'm thinking about giving out sourdough bread for Xmas this year! hahaha... so far I've got 2 takers on it and I figure nothing beats having some homemade bread than that nasty bread from the store that has a gazillion ingredients in it. Gross.

What's cool is the book I have has the main recipe but then gives other options for the bread, like adding certain herbs and stuff. I'll tell you for a beginner like me that kind of stuff is so helpful. I keep telling people I'm going to make bread and they all think I have a breadmaker... nope... making this stuff from scratch like they never heard of such a thing.

I can say that it's thanks to a lot of you guys in this forum that got me pumped up! You guys make it sound so exciting and I finally realized that I need to be excited about my health as well, so I want to say... Thanks to you ladies!
auralpoison
Glad we could inspire, RD. Y'know what they say: garbage in, garbage out. Be sure to share any good new recipes with us!

Damn. I am also too late on the zucchini tip. I make a white three cheese chicken lasagna where I slice the zucchini into thin strips & use it instead of pasta because I can't seem to find whole wheat lasagne. I add mushrooms & spinach, too. Since my benrinner is in storage (I can't get the slices thin & even enough by hand alone.) I haven't made it in more than a year & a half. I'll see if I can't find the recipe & post it.

All the farm ladies on me da's route would load him up with veg (Tomaters, squash, melons, strawberries, rhubarb, okra, etc. Sometimes he'd even bring home a big old sunflower or two so we could make our own seeds.) in the summertime & he'd be goddamned if we didn't eat them all, & zucc is pretty versatile. My mother used to make fried zucchini when I was a kid. She'd do an egg/milk bath, dredge in flour, then dip into a beer/flour mix & fry. When she lived with me, I'd make zucchini nut muffins with a cream cheese frosting. I made a low-carb b-day cake for a friend out of stacked & frosted mini muffins that was a hit.

It's been nice here lately, but it's still fall & I'm feeling the need for hearty comfort food. Tonight I'm buying fixings for holishkes (Cabbage leaves stuffed with ground meat & rice. I like 'em Polish style in a tangy S&S tomater sauce), chili with lots of veg & black soy beans (Black soys taste/look pretty much the same as black beans, but have more calcium, iron & protein.) chicken cottage pie, & slow cooker chicken & dumplings.

Somebody some time back asked for the corn pudding recipe. Most versions of this call for one cup of sour cream, but I don't add it. I also do mine Southwestern style with green chilis/jalapeno. Great with chicken & a chili/lime slaw.

1 box Jiffy corn bread mix
1 can regular corn (I like to use the "fiesta" corn with peppers in it.)
1 can creamed corn
1 egg
8oz sour cream
1oz butter, plus a bit for your pan
1 7oz can of diced green chilis/jalapenos (Totally optional.)

Mix Jiffy with regular corn, canned corn, sour cream, egg & peppers. Pour into a buttered 9X9 pan, (I prefer pyrex or aluminum for a potluck.) dot top with butter, & pop into a preheated 350F oven for 45min or until golden brown on top.

To be honest, I haven't made this since my mom died (It was one of her favorites to have with Coca Cola ham & some collard greens if it was just plain corn.) due to aversion to things in cans. I hadn't eaten it in *years* until she had a yen for it last fall. Recipes for it vary, some call for cheese, Nigella's version ( A butt load of eggs, milk & cream & flour to thicken.) is a heart attack on a plate.

And personally, I like it better cold the next day because I'm weird like that.
pepper
it's funny 'cause her hubby owns a restaurant and they love food but i guess she just didn't use this one much. it is kinda big... oh well.
i'm into the bread, this kind is no-knead which i love. it really is 'quick' bread.
roseviolet
Any Americans out there making anything special for election night? I thought about adapting this recipe for cupcakes filled with cherry sauce. I figured I could call them Bleeding-Heart Liberal cupcakes. I'd love some other ideas, too, if anyone has something fun to share.
pollystyrene
I plan on sitting on the couch, watching the coverage, New Year's noisemaker in one hand and a cyanide capsule at the ready in my teeth. Y'know, just in case.

But maybe some of those cupcakes earlier in the evening. wink.gif
tesao
i got invited to a big party that the embassy is giving - mock candidate debates, wide screen tv election return coverage, food and drinks, and 100s of other US citizens.

haven't decided whether i'm going yet or not. i may prefer to take polly's route.
rubberdollz
Ok so here's something I just made last night.

1 boneless leg of lamb
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup lemon juice

marinate for a few hours or all day. Broil or bbq for 10-12 minutes per side or until medium rare. Serve with juices warmed up.

Ugh... it was so freaking good!!!! Plus I had a ton of leftovers so looks like the hubby and I will be eating lamb for the next few days.
angelle321
I made a loaf of pumpkin bread last night. It turned out better than I expected. So good! Got the recipe from bf's mother. She makes it every fall and I swear she puts crack in it. I'm not usually too into that kind of thing (most of the time, if it doesn't involve chocolate, I'm not interested!) but bf's lucky if I let him have any of it when she gives us our loaf. smile.gif
girlygirlgag
I want to make some stuffed cabbage tonight. I have already downloaded a few recipe, but was wondering if anyone has any tips?

Thanks!
erinjane
Does anyone have any good thai curry recipes (red, green, or yellow). I tried making red curry for the first time the other night and it turned out pretty decent but still needs some work.
pepper
angelle321, wanna post that recipe? i've been baking again (oh no!) and i'm still terrible at it. sigh. so much organic flour into the trash.
auralpoison
GGG, any specific kind of stuffed cabbage? I'm making mine tomorrow morning, I usually go with a Holishke recipe I got from Epicurious for the Polish style with the sweet & citrus-sour tomato sauce. I do make major adjustments on the sugar added, though & cut the white out completely. And I usually cook my rice first. And I freeze my head of cabbage for 48 hours instead of parboiling/blanching them, so the leaves separate easier/faster. I also use as light a weight cabbage as I can.
girlygirlgag
QUOTE(auralpoison @ Nov 10 2008, 11:25 PM) *
GGG, any specific kind of stuffed cabbage? I'm making mine tomorrow morning, I usually go with a Holishke recipe I got from Epicurious for the Polish style with the sweet & citrus-sour tomato sauce. I do make major adjustments on the sugar added, though & cut the white out completely. And I usually cook my rice first. And I freeze my head of cabbage for 48 hours instead of parboiling/blanching them, so the leaves separate easier/faster. I also use as light a weight cabbage as I can.



I don't know half of what you said, but it sounds fantastic!

Do you have a recipe? I just used one that I found on the web.... Though I forgot to buy saurkraut, so I improvised and mixed some cabbage with salt and vinegar.

I takes forever to cook..... I sure am hungry.
auralpoison
Holishkes! I included my tweeks.

Stuffing
1 1/2 pounds groundmeat
3/4 cup uncooked white rice (I cook the *brown* rice first to cut down on expansion/cooks faster.)
1 cup finely chopped onion
2 eggs, beaten
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon finely chopped or crushed fresh garlic
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Sauce
2 cups plain tomato sauce (I use chopped fresh romas in conjunction & go half & half.)
1 1/2 cups finely chopped onion
1/2 orange, chopped with peel into 1/2-inch pieces; remove pits (I use the whole orange/lemon *juices* to taste instead of the chopped whole fruit.)
2/3 lemon, chopped with peel into 1/2-inch pieces; remove pits
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon (I prefer paprika.)
1 cup white sugar (I skip this.)
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup white vinegar ( I use to taste & use a tarragon vinegar.)
2 cups water
1 1/2 teaspoons salt


1 large lightweight young green cabbage
1 medium green cabbage. You'll need 4 cups (if you don't have enough, supplement with leftovers from the large cabbage). ( I only use the one cabbage & shred the remains.)

1. In a large bowl, combine all the stuffing ingredients. Stir them with a fork, then mix thoroughly with your hands. Cover and refrigerate.

2. In another bowl, thoroughly mix all sauce ingredients. Cover and refrigerate.

3. Fill a very large stockpot three-quarters full with water and bring to a rapid boil. While bringing the water to a boil, use a thin, sharp knife to make deep cuts around the core of the large cabbage (cut into the cabbage in a circle about 1/4 inch out from the core). Lift out the core, making a hole about 2 inches wide and 2 1/2 inches deep.

4. Set out a baking tray near the stove. Stick a long cooking fork into the core hole of the large cabbage, and plunge it (carefully, so you don't splash yourself) into the pot of rapidly boiling water. The outer leaves will begin to fall off. Leave them in the boiling water for a few minutes until they're limp and flexible enough for stuffing; then take them out one at a time, and place them on the baking tray. Try not to tear the leaves. When all the leaves are on the tray, transfer it into the sink and pour the boiling water from the pot over them. Wash the leaves carefully in cold water. With a small, sharp knife, trim off the tough outer spines and discard them.

MY STEP 3/4. It's easier. Place cabbage in a plastic bag in freezer at least 2 days in advance. Remove from freezer the night before you intend to make cabbage rolls. Remove from bag and place in colander in sink. In the morning, core cabbage. Leaves will separate easily. Dry with paper towels.

5. Find your largest leaves, and set them out on a plate. Set out all other leaves on another plate. One at a time, line each large leaf with another large leaf or two smaller leaves. (The idea is to strengthen your cabbage wrapping so that the stuffing stays securely inside during cooking. Be sure to align the spines of inner and outer leaves.) Stuff with 3/4 cup of the meat-rice mixture, roll very tightly along the spine, and close both sides by tucking them in with your fingers. The spine should be vertical in the center of tour roll.

6. Stir the 4 cups of chopped cabbage into the sauce. Pour 3/4 inch of the sauce into a large, wide-bottomed stockpot. Arrange the cabbage rolls carefully on top of the sauce, and pour the remainder of the sauce over them to cover. Cover pot and simmer for 1 hour and 45 minutes. Serve with boiled potatoes and a vegetable.

My STEP 5/6. Place a heaping tablespoon of mixture near stem end of each leaf. Fold stem end over filling, then fold in the sides; roll up firmly.

Combine sauce ingredients. Shred the core and any leftover cabbage. In a Dutch oven, place a layer of cabbage, a layer of cabbage rolls (seam-side-down), tightly packed, then a layer of sauce. Repeat until all is used. Simmer gently for 2 hours on top of stove tightly covered.


I hope this isn't too confusing. I tried the Epicurious recipe first the way it was, but I'm too lazy & it was too sweet. So I found another easier one & combined the two, made some adjustments.
crazyoldcatlady
food i'd like to fuck, indeed
auralpoison
Oh, fuck me with a chainsaw gently. Thems the cold rock shit! Why ya'lls bitches gotta show me that? Do you want me to get fatter?!

GGG, how were your holishkes? Mine kicked ass. I put half the batch up to freeze & wanna thaw them already.
crinoline
so here's the dilemma - I'm going to a cookout tomorrow and I'm bringing dessert. I know I want to make a lemon pie, but I can't decide if I want to do lemon chess or meringue. I'd like to make it ahead of time (tonight), and I'm afraid the meringue might weep if refrigerated. BUT the lemon chess is a much less cute presentation. I might make both, even though there will only be five people there...

What do y'all think?
crazyoldcatlady
i can't make the meringue part for the life of me (i WILL make it my bitch... someday) so i'm biased. i say lemon chess.
crinoline
yeah, I think I'm gonna go for chess because it's just easier.

some tips for meringue - make extra sure that your mixing bowl and mixer attachments are squeaky clean, any oil that gets in there will ruin it. Add your sugar one tablespoon at a time, completely incorporating each spoonful before adding the next. Also, fresh eggs are key, otherwise you run the risk of weeping.
hope that helps!
crinoline
The chess baked up beautifully. i bought some whipping cream to top it with, because a chess pie just looks so naked! (but boy does it smell good!)
kittenb
I asked for a subscription to Cooking Light this year for my birthday. This past Friday I made my first successful steak dinner. It wasn't too dry and it was done at just the right amount. I was very proud of myself. I also made baked french fries. They were so good and simple. It was just two potatoes, sliced into fry size and then baked for 40 minutes at 450 degrees on cookie sheets. Coat them with cooking spray and place the cookie sheets on two different trays in your stove, one in the highest level, one on the lowest. At 20 minutes, switch the tray placement.
When the fries are done, toss them with thyme.
YUM!
erinjane
Kitten, you know what makes those kind of fries even better? Covering them in shake'n'bake or something similar.
Nova
QUOTE(kittenb @ Nov 24 2008, 09:32 AM) *
I asked for a subscription to Cooking Light this year for my birthday. This past Friday I made my first successful steak dinner. It wasn't too dry and it was done at just the right amount. I was very proud of myself. I also made baked french fries. They were so good and simple. It was just two potatoes, sliced into fry size and then baked for 40 minutes at 450 degrees on cookie sheets. Coat them with cooking spray and place the cookie sheets on two different trays in your stove, one in the highest level, one on the lowest. At 20 minutes, switch the tray placement.
When the fries are done, toss them with thyme.
YUM!


That sounds really good right now, even after pigging out yesterday at the family get-together. I've been on a sweet potato kick lately... I wonder how sweet potato and thyme would mesh.
Lily_Anne
QUOTE(Nova @ Nov 28 2008, 10:30 AM) *
I wonder how sweet potato and thyme would mesh.


I love sweet potato fries. But sweet instead of savory.
Caryn
I made something new on the fly for dinner last night...it wasn't fancy or difficult by any means, but it was perfect cold-weather food. I had a couple of frozen boneless skinless chicken breasts in the freezer - I defrosted them, cut them into cubes, and sauteed them with salt and pepper. Then I cooked some egg noodles (I used the wide, flat No Yolks kind). Once they were done and drained, I added some canned Cream of Mushroom soup, the chicken, and some peas.

I've had bread on the brain for a while now, and I think I want to make some from scratch, but I've never done it before, and I'm a little hesitant. I'll get in a mood one of these days on a weekend night and just do it. Does anyone have any recipes that are really good?
auralpoison
I always wonder about the peas in chicken noodle casserole. I don't much like peas, but everybody puts them in chicken noodle casseroles. I had some at me grandad's right before Thanksgiving, so I've been thinking on it some. I always use broc, sometimes mushrooms.

We cooked a lot for Thanksgiving, somehow I wound up making most of the stuff I hate to eat including the yams. I just don't like them. I keep trying to no avail. Maybe if I did them up pommes frites style I'll like them better. Huh. Thanks, guys.

Caryn, I do believe one of our resident bread experts is Pepper. Scroll back through the archives & I bet she'll have some good advice for you on the breadmaking. I do think she's vegan, though, so you might want to take that into consideration.
Lily_Anne
Hey Caryn,

This is a great quick-bread recipe. It makes for a heartier, dense texture that goes well with soups. I call it "lazy bread" because I simply mix the ingredients together and stick it in the oven.

Preheat oven to 450F

Mix
3c flour
1tsp salt
1tsp baking soda
1 tablespoon mix-in of choice (rosemary is my fave)

Add
1.5 c buttermilk*

*Or 1.5 c regular milk plus 1tsp vinegar. This is what activates the soda.

Form into a ball and place on baking sheet. Cut an X on top. Bake for 20 mins. Then lower temp to 400. It's done in another 15 mins or so, when tapping on the loaf makes a hollow sound.

Happy baking!
Caryn
auralpoison - to be honest, I thought I needed some kind of vegetable, but didn't feel like making a side dish, so I threw in the peas, lol. I think they are found in casseroles a lot because they're bland and blend in. My mom always put them in tuna casserole, too.

Mushrooms would have been a good addition too. The Mr. won't eat broccoli. I have to find ways to sneak vegetables onto the table.

Lily, thanks for the recipe...it looks really easy! When you say you cut an X in the top...how deep are you cutting? All the way through?
auralpoison
I just hated peas so virulently as a child that my mother never served them in anything. I wouldn't eat asparagus for years because I'd only ever had them out of a can & they tasted like peas to me. Now I love it as long as it's fresh or frozen. I like steamed or stirfried snap peas if they are still in their pod. I'll eat them mashed in Indian food or with fish & chips. Any other way & I pick them out. I used to drive the Thai people nuts because I don't like carrots or peas in my rice. God, I'm weird.

I thought I hated a lot of things growing up, just turned mom couldn't cook for shite, really.
stargazer
i made these pecan pie truffles that we were quite the hit at the Chicago Bustie Holiday Get Together.

Recipe courtesy of Veg News:

2 1/2 c pecans, toasted and finely choppe
1 c graham-cracker crumbs
1 c dark brown sugar, packed
1/2 tsp salt
2 tbsp maple syrup
1/4 c bourbon
1 tsp vanilla
7 oz. dark chocolate*

1) In a medium bowl, stir together the pecans, graham-cracker crumbs, brown sugar, and salt until well combined. Add the maple syrup, bourbon, and vanilla, stirring thoroughly. Use your hands to make sure the mixture becomes fully incorporated.

2) Form the mixture into walnut-sized balls, then place on a sheet pan and freeze for 2 hours.**

3) In the top of a double boiler or in a medium stainless-steel bowl set over a pot of gently simmering water, melt chocolate. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or Silpat. Dip the frozen balls into the melted chocolate, then place onto prepared baking sheet. Let sit for 15 minutes or until firm. Truffles should be stored at room temperature in an airtight container.

*7 oz. of dark chocolate. You might want to buy more chocolate.

** Make sure you hands are wet with water to allow the mixture to form in your hands.
Lily_Anne
QUOTE(Caryn @ Dec 6 2008, 11:42 PM) *
When you say you cut an X in the top...how deep are you cutting? All the way through?


Go ahead and cut so that the knife hits the baking pan. The loaf should still be in one piece. When the loaf bakes, it will rise and have a nice X in the middle. Like the song Hot Cross Buns!
candycane_girl
Is there any way to incorporate buttermilk AND ranch flavouring into one mashed potatoes recipe? Or is that asking too much? I want to make super creamy delicious mashed potatoes at Christmas and I thought it would be cool if I made buttermilk ranch mashed potatoes but so far every search I've done hasn't combined the two. Any suggestions?
ihateoly
QUOTE(candycane_girl @ Dec 11 2008, 01:41 PM) *
Is there any way to incorporate buttermilk AND ranch flavouring into one mashed potatoes recipe? Or is that asking too much? I want to make super creamy delicious mashed potatoes at Christmas and I thought it would be cool if I made buttermilk ranch mashed potatoes but so far every search I've done hasn't combined the two. Any suggestions?

Why yes, make your ranch dressing with buttermilk! Mmmm...mashed potatoes... ohmy.gif *slobbery noise*
pollystyrene
For the bacon lovers out there.
erinjane
Oh man, I like my fair share of bacon but that looks really sick to me. I can picture my older brother loving it though. My favourite bacon snack is bacon wrapped water chestnuts...mmm...
stargazer
dood, that bacon is the grossest thing ever. i think my arteries clogged just looking at the pictures.
Lily_Anne
Food for the eyes!

It's not edible, but I couldn't decide where else to post this.
Caryn
I tried the bread, and it flopped, but I didn't get it done all the way in the middle. I think I also didn't mix it quite enough - I was hurrying to get it in the oven. It smelled soooo gooood, though; I'm going to try it again after the holidays.
pollystyrene
QUOTE(Lily_Anne @ Dec 14 2008, 02:27 AM) *
Food for the eyes!

It's not edible, but I couldn't decide where else to post this.


Here, I fixed your link.

You used the word "post" instead of "URL".

That's crazy, though- towels!
Lily_Anne
Thanks, polly - I went back and fixed that too.
I love the picture of all the treats on the shelf, just like a real pastry shop!
Alas, once you take them apart the magic is gone.
ihateoly
Is it just me or does that "woven" bacon look like a door mat? Heh. That thing looks soooo greasy. Bacon and cheese are good, but I do believe that's too much of both at one time.
pollystyrene
Baking bacon actually makes it less greasy than frying it in a pan (at least the way I do it, placing cooling racks in a cookie sheet so it drains to the bottom)....if you sliced the roll, you'd only be getting the equivalent of a couple of strips of bacon per slice. There is a lot of cheese though. People in the comments suggested balancing it out, putting scrambled eggs or hash browns inside too. You could put veggies in there, too.
erinjane
The holidays just aren't the holidays with Shortbread and Sugar Cookies!
I went on a cookie making rampage last night. I did about 25 cutesy decorated sugar cookies and then about 85 shortbreads. Now, I firmly believe these are the best shortbread cookies in the world, although shortbread is pretty standard.

I called up my 90 year old Nana last night (who usually makes us a bucket full of shortbread but is having her kitchen re-done so hasn't done it...yet...at 90 she's still on top of them). Her's always taste just a little bit better so I grilled her on EXACTLY what she does. Here's the recipe:

-1lb butter (no margarine here!)
-1 cup brown sugar
-4 scant cups of flour
-1 'dribble' of vanilla
-1 'dribble' of almond (optional, I didn't put any in)
-1 pinch of salt

Cream butter and sugar together with mixer. Add salt, vanilla, and almond. By hand (wooden spoon technique for me), slowly add the flour until it has reached a thick consistency but not so that it's breaking apart. Put the dough in the fridge for 30-60 minutes to stiffen - or if you're like me and incredibly inpatient, throw it in the freezer for 10 minutes. Flour your surface, roll out the dough, and cut out some shortbreads. Bake for 8-12 minutes at 325 degrees, checking often. They should be just a little golden when you remove them. Shortbread tastes better the longer it sits, so I always make tons and put a box of them away until Christmas Eve when they're absolutely perfect. Just like Nana makes 'em!
mouse
it's unreasonably cold here (yes, i'm aware that weather in the 40s is not really that cold for most of the country but as i just pointed out to a bustie on facebook, LA is unprepared for such temperatures in that our houses really have no insulation and paltry heating systems, so IT'S FUCKING COLD and this is coming from someone who spent 22 years in the northeast) so i've been making lots of soup. last week i made a yummy tomato barley, this past weekend i made a hodge-podge of what was around (celery, heirloom carrots, onions, chickpeas, barley & the last of some homemade veggie stock--threw in some turkey meatballs for good measure), and tonight i made this with a couple of substitutions to fit my pantry (broccoli for cauliflower, barley for bulgur, chicken stock for veggie) and it was absolutely amazing. lovely delicate orange-flavored broth chock full of veggies. yum yum yum.

i've been hardcore farmer's marketing lately and it's so good. some gorgeous rainbow chard went into the soup too. my favorite vendor sells sprouts and fresh grains (where i got all the barley) and homemade hummus from his own chickpeas; he is a wonderful weirdo hippie old man who grows wheatgrass and says "a little hum-hum-hum!" when i ask him for hummus. wub.gif
auralpoison
Does anybody here know anything about making a leg of lamb? My auntie got a bug up her ass about Xmas dinner & wanting to try something new. Legs of lamb are on sale, so that's what she's decided upon & she asked me to cook it. And I am clueless because I've never made one before! It seems fairly simple, but I don't want to louse it up. Any tips?
pollystyrene
The only time I've made leg of lamb, it was Greek-style. The recipe is kinda long, so I'll just give you the gist of it- lots of garlic, oregano, pepper, olive oil. Mix that up, put it in your roasting pan, put the leg on top and turn it to coat the lamb. Put it in the fridge and marinade for 2 hours (or as long as overnight). Take it out of the fridge after that time and set it out, letting it come back up to room temperature (still sitting in the marinade). Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Roasting time will depend on how big the leg is.

Lamb is considered rare at 140 degrees and well-done at 160 degrees. Personally, I'm not a fan of rare lamb (beef, yes; lamb, no) so I like medium. The leg of lamb I made was ginormous and I had to take the temperature at the thick end and the thin end.

Remember to let the meat rest for 5-10 minutes after taking it out of the oven before you cut it up.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2014 Invision Power Services, Inc.