Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: barefoot, precocious, and in the kitchen
The BUST Lounge > Forums > Absolutely Fad-ulous
Pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34
yuefie
Oh bunny, that black pepper boursin is fantastic on a burger or steak sandwich.
bunnyb
Mmmm, that sounds delectable! I love Stilton on a burger.
crazyoldcatlady
i want fondu. with bread bits and all things carb. i want to dunk cheese cubes in melted cheese.

i realize this contributes nothing to the conversation, but you all were talking about cheese and i immediately started thinking of all things food porn.
rubberdollz
Ok so my husbands birthday was this past thursday. I ended up making caesar salads for us and the dressing was home-made which turned out just as good as this store bought stuff we usually get. Then I cooked up a steak for us both and for his birthday dessert... I got a cheesecake from Whole Foods! It was a raspberry swirl mini cheesecake which was a perfect size, it was the BEST cheesecake! Oh my lord, my mouth is still watering thinking about how yummy it was.

He ended up really enjoying his birthday meal and we saved a ton of money by me just cooking at home. It's nice to have leftovers too.

Does anyone ever go out to a restaurant and maybe you decide this time you are going to get dessert and it ends up being super disappointing so you feel like you just wasted your taste buds on this crappy dessert? I hate that!
roseviolet
Today I realized that Pi Day - March 14th - is fast approaching. It's on a Saturday this year, so we're thinking of throwing a big pie party! But which pies should be made? Any ideas?

I've made shepherd's pie for my friends numerous times and they love it, but I'd like to do something new & different. I just need to come up with something. As for dessert, Sheff has requested a Bakewell tart (almond filling with raspberries) but I'm thinking of making a second pie, too. Maybe chocolate. Or key lime!
pollystyrene
I've had a recipe for a coconut-banana cream pie floating around for awhile. Maybe I'll make that. Oh, good 3/14 is a Saturday, so I'll be able to make it that day!
candycane_girl
Ooh, would you be willing to share that? I've been wanting to try a coconut-banana cream pie for a while.
pollystyrene
Here it is. We'll see if it's good.
auralpoison
My fave pies are probably sweet potato (Like pumpkin but not sucky.), buttermilk, or raisin.
Lilacgypsy1
QUOTE(roseviolet @ Mar 3 2009, 09:25 PM) *
Today I realized that Pi Day - March 14th - is fast approaching. It's on a Saturday this year, so we're thinking of throwing a big pie party! But which pies should be made? Any ideas?

I've made shepherd's pie for my friends numerous times and they love it, but I'd like to do something new & different. I just need to come up with something. As for dessert, Sheff has requested a Bakewell tart (almond filling with raspberries) but I'm thinking of making a second pie, too. Maybe chocolate. Or key lime!

Bakewell Tart- almond filling with Raspberries--What is this?--I've never heard of it and it sounds wonderful. Do you have a recipe?
Lilacgypsy1
roseviolet
QUOTE(Lilacgypsy1 @ Mar 5 2009, 12:39 AM) *
Bakewell Tart- almond filling with Raspberries--What is this?--I've never heard of it and it sounds wonderful. Do you have a recipe?
Lilacgypsy1


I have a recipe from Nigella Lawson's "How To Eat", but I'm still looking for variations. Nigella's is different from the version of the tart I ate in England. It's tasty, but it isn't quite right. For instance, she uses real raspberries instead of raspberry jam. I think next time I'm going to try this recipe instead: Cherry Bakewell Tartlets.
auralpoison
I made the tastiest baked pork ribs for dinner tonight!

Bulk ribs were on sale, so I bought a couple pounds. I didn't want to go the traditional route & make my family's dry-rubbed smoked ribs because I'm not an outdoor smoker expert (One of my feminist transgressions is that I leave the outdoor smoking/grilling to the menfolk. Cooking with fire is just not my bailiwick.) & I really didn't want to slather them with our secret recipe sauce, I wanted to go lighter. I did (two) pulled-out-my-ass versions, with stuff I had on hand.

Tonight's were marinated in Girard's Champagne dressing (I know, I know, I hate bottled anything, but I haven't managed to perfect the formulation yet. It tastes odd without the MSG. But I WILL figure it out!), a few squeezes of spicy stone ground mustard, onion, garlic, pepper, & I KNOW this is gonna sound weird, but several healthy squeezes of fish sauce (For some reason, fish sauce just does something delicious to pork!). I marinated for twelve hours, setting aside some marinade for a light sauce. I preheated the oven to 350 & quickly browned the ribs on the stove. I placed the ribs into a roasting pan, tightly covered them with foil & baked them for an two hours removing the foil for the last half hour of baking. They were very flavourful without being overpowering & fall off the bone tender.

The ones I'm making to take to my grandad's after church tomorrow are a spicier, Thai chili version with rice wine vinegar, EVOO, a dash of sesame oil for flavour, fish sauce, pepper, onion, garlic, ginger, & orange. I'm going to toss them with some black sesame seeds before I toss them in the oven with same directions above. I thought I'd serve it with herbed rice & an orange/asparagus/cabbage/sliced almond salad.

RD, you might want to consider spatchcocking/butterflying your game hens/poultry in the future. It cuts the cooking time down considerably & is easy to do or you can ask your butcher to do it for you! My fave way to do game hens is to spatchcock them, sear them skin side down in light oil on the stove for 8 min, brush with herb butter & then toss them into a 425 oven for 25-30 min. The skin gets so crispy & crackly & golden! And it cuts the time down to about 45 minutes total.
edie52
Aural, that 2nd ribs recipe sounds AMAZING, let us know how they turn out! I've never made ribs; I don't cook much meat. I'm fairly handy in the kitchen but I'm most comfortable with "easy" stuff like soups, stews, veg curries, and pasta dishes. My wonderful boyfriend's birthday is coming up soon and I would love to make him ribs... maybe with these cute potatoes and a nice salad or steamed veggies. And wine, of course.

I'm also contemplating this cake, since it seems fairly simple (one layer), and he'll like the unexpected ingredient (Guinness). Originally I was searching for a recipe for coconut-espresso cake with either dark chocolate or bourbon vanilla icing (trying to combine all of the things he loves). I wonder if the chocolate stout cake would be weird with coconut icing, instead of cream cheese?
pollystyrene
I have made this version of that cake, edie, (thanks to the elusive bustie Tart!) and it is wonderful. I think the dutch process cocoa makes a huge difference- so much darker and richer. For my frosting I used whipping cream and mixed in some of the chocolate syrup from Trader Joe's (best chocolate syrup there is!) I agree with that article- the cake is very moist, but not especially sweet, which I love. I love mine with the chocolate-whipped cream frosting, but cream cheese could be good; I don't think coconut would be bad, but I'd be afraid of it adding too much sweet. Are you thinking of like a German chocolate cake frosting? Or just sprinkling coconut over buttercream frosting?
edie52
I hadn't even thought it through, Polly, but now that I've thought about it, definintely NOT German chocolate cake frosting (I've never even had that kind of cake... but I've made that frosting for date cake- Queen Elizabeth cake). I think that would be too sweet, plus I'd like to try something new. I'd like to find a recipe for a smooth frosting that calls for a can of coconut cream. It might still be sweet compared to the cake, but not overkill like the brown sugar/heavy cream/butter version that goes on a Queen Elizabeth cake.

Since I haven't ever tried the cake I'm having a hard time imagining the nutty, rich, sweetness of coconut cream in combination with it. Do you taste the beer at all in the cake or does it just serve to make it moist?
pollystyrene
It definitely adds richness to the flavor, and you taste that heavy "loaf of bread" flavor (without being wheaty, if that makes sense- there is sort of a nutty, earthiness to it) that Guinness has come through. But if you didn't tell someone that there was Guinness in it, they probably wouldn't know. They'd just think it was very rich chocolate.
bunnyb
Mmmm, cherry bakewells...

Does anybody have a good risotto recipe they could share? I'm looking to recreate a lemon/garlic butter/shrimp risotto I ate once but am open to other great recipes.

I made banana bread for the first time this weekend and it was delicious (the lovely yuefie's recipe).
turbojenn
Hey bunny -

I've got a couple on my blog:

http://thewholekitchen.blogspot.com/2009/0...ab-risotto.html

http://thewholekitchen.blogspot.com/2008/1...om-risotto.html

Risotto is one of those things that takes to any flavors you throw at it, and lemon/butter/shrimp sounds awesome. I'd add a bit of lemon juice and the zest of the lemon in right at the end. I usually cook the shrimp right in the risotto when it's almost done.
edie52
The chocolate Guinness cake turned out pretty good- rich, dense, moist. I may have over-cooked it a bit (a bad habit of mine- I'm afraid of things being under-done), because I imagined it moister, but it wasn't totally dry or anything. I settled on plain cream cheese icing.

I didn't try to make ribs or anything else for his birthday. I'm not domestically advanced enough to handle dinner and a cake in the same day. Instead we had a sort of kitchen picnic with cheese, bread, hummus and pickles, and a really nice bottle of wine, a Spanish Rioja.
bunnyb
Thanks for the recipes and tips, turbojenn!

I enjoy reading your blog and getting ideas; I forgot that you recently posted the crab risotto recipe.
turbojenn
Thanks, bunny! It just absolutely tickles me when people tell me they're reading my blog. wink.gif

This weekend will bring roasted rack of lamb and my family recipe for corned beef...Mmmmm. And more tomato soup, but I already wrote about that one.
candycane_girl
Does anyone know what the spices are for Mexican or tex-mex cooking? I'd like to be able to season meat and other things without having to rely on Old El Paso taco seasoning.
auralpoison
I always use cumin, chili powder, onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, & a little oregano.
zoya
At bunnyb's request, crossposted from "what I ate":


AP and I had dinner last night. Amazing restaurant, all small plates that we shared. here's what we ate:

Artisan cheese plate (I can't remember the cheeses, she can tell you. they were stunning)
curry cauliflower soup with hints of coriander and mint
quail stuffed with rabbit confit on a bed of braised cabbage and beets
crawfish beignets with sweet pepper aioli and spicy powdered sugar
suckling pig with home made sausage with rice and baby greens
mussels steamed in lemon-garlic-butter with focaccia

and then, there was the piece de resistance:

Seared Foie Gras with home made brown bread, slightly baked apple slices, all covered with a port wine reduction.

now I've never been much of a Foie Gras fan... but that dish was beyond food porn. It was sheer food erotica. High erotica at that. We just sat there, pretty much unable to do anything but lean back against our seats and kind of moan while we were eating it. It was so insanely fantastic we had to order a second one. It was quite honestly one of the best things I've eaten in my entire life.

...and it was so much like having amazing sex that we both had to smoke a cigarette after it. God, I'm going into raptures just thinking about the flavor.
roseviolet
Holy shit, Zoya. Where was this?!
auralpoison
Beatrice & Woodsley The menu changes frequently, I stole one of ours to fondle at a later food-horny date.

I have never before cherished a burp, but burping that seared foie gras was the absolute tits. I would step over a naked & begging Johnny Depp for another sliver of that divine, rich, fatty succulence.

The cheese! Oh, the cheese! One was an unpasteurized, grassy tasting French goat cheese, the middle was an earthy, nutty Italian cow cheese, & the last my most beloved, Brillat-Savarin. It's like butter & cheese had a baby & it was delicious!

And you know what? Both Zoy & I disdain the beets. HATE them. But the ones under the the quail? Were so good! Cabbage, beets, & little hunks of apple.

ETA: I am sitting up late at night drinking a glass of pomegranate juice & considering order a whole duck's liver for $75.
zoya
.... AP, and don't forget our fantasy of smearing that foie gras on a penis and licking it off....mmmmmm....


yes, girls, it was THAT FUCKING GOOD.
auralpoison
Dude, I would fer reals lick that foie gras off of the giant, gnarled cock of Satan himself.

Another restaurant back home, Zengo, served a foie gras wonton soup & I found a similar recipe online.

I am seriously considering buying that duck liver. I'm not sure I can eat a whole pound of it in two days though. . . aw, who am I kidding? I'll make the damned soup, sear a bit, & maybe make some foie gras fried rice.
roseviolet
I tried a new cookie recipe today that I really like: lemon sugar cookies. The dough was really sticky, so I suggest you cover it & put it in the fridge for at least 30 minutes before rolling it into balls. The cookies have a great texture - lightly browned and crispy on the edges and chewy in the center. The recipe is easily adaptable, too. I put some dried blueberries in a few balls of dough before baking & I really like how they turned out. I think I'll make some with cherries next time.
angie_21
Candycane - if you get adventurous you can also add coriander, cilantro, or cianne pepper flakes. I also use a small can or 2 of chopped green peppers for stew or chili (yuuuuum).
auralpoison
Y'know, cayenne pepper flakes make just about everything better. I throw them in with my greens, I make a hot & sour cucumber/red onion salad with them, in stirfry. Mmmmm! Spicy!

Is it weird that I hate cilantro/coriander? People always say it's citrus-y, but I think it tastes of dish soap.
pollystyrene
Cilantro has a notorious reputation for being a herb that people love or hate. I'm on the love end of it, but "it tastes like soap" is the most common description for people who hate it. I say "more for me"!
angie_21
I looooooove cilantro. I could put it on anything. Doesn't taste like soap at all to me, but it must be one of those things that's just different for different people.
treehugger
I'm a "cilantro tastes like soap" person too. I have actually heard that if it tastes like that to you, you shouldn't be eating it because you have a mild allergy to it.

I don't know how much stock to put on that theory though.
solaria
I made pizza the other night and I'm still thinking about it . Homemade whole wheat crust, olive oil, canned tomatoes garlic, veggies....and my partner is vegan so we made "cheeze" sauce w/ tofu, pumpkin seeds, red bell peppers and nutritional yeast and salt all blended up. it was sooooooo good. I might make it again today.
rubberdollz
I've heard that if after you eat something and you have to keep clearing your throat, like it feels phlegmy.. that you may have an allergy to something you ate.

Tonight I made a flank steak, rolled with a stuffing made of celery, onion and cranberries. The recipe called for raisins but I'm not a big raisin fan so I used cranberries instead. You brown the steak in a skillet, add red wine and beef stock and you cook it for 2 hours. It was really good!
candycane_girl
I have a few food related queries.

1. Scrambled eggs. Is there some kind of secret to getting them light and fluffy?

2. What do y'all put in your egg salad? Mine is kind of boring. Generally I add mayo, ranch dressing, salt, pepper and either chives or green onions. I feel like it needs some kind of zip. I have no idea what to add though, I'm not good at detecting specific flavours in the egg salad sandwiches I get from other places.

3. I think my family may finally be having a ham at Easter! Usually we do ham the night before and turkey on Easter but I guess my grandmother's been complaining that we should be eating ham. Or something. Anyway, usually we just have scalloped potatoes and peas with it but I'd like to make the menu more interesting. Any suggestions?

Also, that restaurant meal sounds like food porn.
Divala
Try adding some yellow mustard and maybe a little paprika to your egg salad. I usually have to add extra to mine because it's too bland from most places.
ketto
QUOTE(candycane_girl @ Mar 31 2009, 11:17 PM) *
I have a few food related queries.

1. Scrambled eggs. Is there some kind of secret to getting them light and fluffy?

3. I think my family may finally be having a ham at Easter! Usually we do ham the night before and turkey on Easter but I guess my grandmother's been complaining that we should be eating ham. Or something. Anyway, usually we just have scalloped potatoes and peas with it but I'd like to make the menu more interesting. Any suggestions?

Also, that restaurant meal sounds like food porn.


1) Milk! I personally think I make the best scrambled eggs. I just mix 2 eggs and 1-2 tbsp milk and whisk it really hard. I find the eggs are always fuffy and have a really nice taste.

2) This popped into my head but I wonder if you can make scalloped potatoes with yams...i love regular and sweet potatoes mixed together.
rubberdollz
Mmmmm... eggs cooked in real butter. Those are yummy!

I've had mustard in egg salad and it does give it a zip.
auralpoison
Ranch dressing? In egg salad? Isn't that some sort of egg salad blasphemy? HAH! I use mayo, mustard, green onions, & either paprika or dill depending whether I'm feeling devil'd or traditional. If I'm feeling crunchy, I'll add some finely chopped celery, too.

CCG, how is your family doing the ham? Being true to our Southern roots, our Easter feast will be ham (I'm doing a Coca Cola ham with a CC/brown sugar/mustard glaze), sweet corn pudding, sweet potatoes, collard greens, various salads, a veggie platter, & deviled eggs.

I ordered some Brillat-Savarin, but it's a pre-order item & takes three weeks to ship. I am waiting with knife in hand.
candycane_girl
AP, I don't know about the Coke thing but a brown sugar glaze sure sounds good. I wish we could have a honey glazed ham. Alas, my grandfather is diabetic so the ham is...just ham.

This year it's going to be ham, biscuits, scalloped potatoes and sauteed spinach with a nice lemon cake for dessert.

I made the mistake of trying to use honey dijan instead of just plain old mustard in my egg salad. It was gross.
auralpoison
Coca Cola ham is genuis! The left over liquor makes an excellent base for black bean soup.
zoya
ok, this isn't about food, but I think it belongs here.... so I'm cleaning out my storage space, and I look in the drawer of this kitchen cart - and OMG, there is a BRAND NEW Henckels chef's knife, and a Henckels knife steel!!! ... As in, I bought them like 3 years ago, and totally forgot about them! it's like christmas!!
pollystyrene
Does anyone have a good cream cheese frosting recipe? I hate it when there's just a hint of cream cheese flavor, and it tastes mostly like powdered sugar. I want something really rich and cream cheesy.
auralpoison
Yknow, I've always made it by taste rather than by measure.

Two packages softened cream cheese
4 tbsp softened butter
1 tsp vanilla
about 1 1/2 cups of sifted powdered sugar. My mom liked it a litle sweeter, so if it was for her I added another half cup of sugar.

Creme the cheese & butter until creamy, add vanilla, slowly add powdered sugar.
summerbabe
QUOTE(candycane_girl @ Apr 1 2009, 04:17 AM) *
I have a few food related queries.

1. Scrambled eggs. Is there some kind of secret to getting them light and fluffy?



This is a little late, but I have a technique that works really well for fluffy scrambled eggs! Add milk (or cream), like ketto said, to the eggs and beat well, with the bowl at an angle. Then melt butter in the pan, and pour in the eggs (keep the heat low). The secret to getting them super fluffy is, instead of scrambling them around, gently push the eggs from the outside edge of the pan to the middle as they slowly cook. Just keep pushing the eggs to the centre, so it's more like folding them over than scrambling them. I usually break the eggs up into smaller pieces in the pan right before I take them out. They come out sooooooo good this way!
pollystyrene
Aural, I used your recipe over the one someone from my Facebook plea sent to me. My carrot cake cookies are delicious with it, and my taste-testers said it was faboo! Thanks!!

Here's the recipe for the carrot cake cookies (I added a bunch of coconut, too- I like my carrot cake with all the stuff in it.) They come out nice and soft. A little cakey, a little cookie-y. I put a generous schmear of aural's frosting on the underside of one and slap another one onto it, so they're like little sandwiches. I'm sure LeBoy's family will love them (and if not, more for me!)
hellotampon
I know I'm a little late to the cilantro discussion, but I used to hate it. I thought it tasted like soap too, and I heard that when you taste it like that, it's supposedly genetic.

But over the last few years it's stopped tasting like soap to me and I love it now.

???
pixiedust
Ok..so today I decided to make rack of lamb for Easter. For some reason I have always felt intimidated by lamb. It's just been in the last year that I have been starting to make Lamb steaks. Anyway, I found this recipie and it was so good Mr. Pixie described it as "mouth sex". It was quite possibly the best meal I have ever eaten, much less prepared!Rack of Lamb It was fabtastic with mint jelly on the side!
I made steamed Asperagus, wild rice, and a garlic heb chiabatta bread with it! Plus we had a bottle of Cabernet Sauviognon. We normally don't like dry wines, but it was perfect with the lamb.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2014 Invision Power Services, Inc.