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bunnyb
I have such a long list of things to read and a huge pile of borrowed books but I have ordered a copy of The Blood of Flowers (mouse, I think I'd run out and read anything that you recommend, after Fall on Your Knees wub.gif) and need to bump Lionel Shriver and Never Let Me Go up the list.

The Gathering was bleak and the chronology was confusing but it was well-written, other than that.
edie52
I'm looking for a book I kind of vaguely remember hearing about and I'm wondering if anyone can help me.

I remember reading a newspaper review of it somewhere in the neighborhood of one year ago, or more. Anyway, it was definitely written by a woman, and it was non-fiction- a collection of essays, maybe- about walking/wandering. Mostly in literary history I think. She talked about the romanticized notion of les flaneurs wandering in Paris. There was also something about the song "Walking After Midnight." It sounded like a worthwhile read.

Anyone?
mouse
ooh, bunny, pressure! uh oh! the blood of flowers was really good, but imho can't hold a candle to fall on your knees...just so you don't get your hopes up toooo far!
kiss_the_fiddler
i'm jealous of you gals (and guys) who read. i hear about the books you're all reading and some of them i'd really like to read. I'm an abysmal reader. I had to take a bunch of tests before they'd let be back into school. After years of trying to figure it out, i finally tested out the highest i ever have - at barely a 6th grade level, same as 11 year old children. And, some days, I can't read at all. I see the letters on the page and my mind knows they're making words but I can't for the life of me figure out how they fig together to make any sense in the world. I get so frustrated that I give up and often don't even try. So, gripe over. It's not all that bad. I did make it through a Master's degree with a 4.0 without reading a thing. I compensate in other ways. anyway. . . just wanted to say y'all who're reading great books are lucky.

fiddler
octobersky
Fiddler - I'm not diagnosing anything, but you sound like you have a similar problem to my brother. He always complained that reading gave him headaches and the words would just "swim" in front of his eyes. Our mom had him diagnosed early (when he was a freshman), so it did help. I cannot for the life of me remember what exactly his diagnosis was, but the doctor made him specialized glasses to help him focus (his vision was 20/20) and prescribe certain eye exercises to retrain his eyes. The doctor specializes in problems such as my brother's, so not all eye doctors can do this. My brother said it really did help, though even to this day he's not crazy about reading, but when he has to he can. For some reason he finds he can read better online that in an actual book. I know when I was studying to be a teacher a professor said that some people benefit from putting a colored transparency (like blue or red) over the page, somehow this helps the eyes focus better.

That said there are so many books on cd, a friend of mine has to drive alot for work so this is how she "reads" books. Works very well and most best sellers or classics can be found on cd.
kiss_the_fiddler
hey octobersky.

when i was a kiddo, i was part of a 'groundbreaking study' that used the colored transparency things over the pages. it didn't help me at all. i also did eye exercises every single night for years. i think for me, it's an issue with the Broca's area of my brain. I see the letters and know that they make up words. I know that somewhere and somehow I know what the words are. It's simply a blank space in my understanding and ability to process that happens sometimes. i used to get material from the state library for the sight impaired. it was nice because they were free and i could choose from a list of what i wanted to 'read'. i don't remember why i don't do that anymore. anyway . . .

fiddler
octobersky
Sorry fiddler, I was just trying to be helpful since your problem bore so much similarity to my brother's.........
nickclick
i've never heard of 'the golden notebook' by doris lessing, who just won the nobel prize for literature. articles say it's a feminist classic. who's read it?
kiss_the_fiddler
octoberskky,
I do appreciate your comments. If I sounded unappreciative I didn't mean to be. I'm sorry.

fiddler
octobersky
Nah fiddler I didn't take it that way. It's cool. smile.gif
prettynpink
I'm going to a Laurell K Hamilton book signing tonight! SQUEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

I'm having her sign the first book of hers that I owned and the cover of the first comic book. I'm so freakin' excited.
crinoline
prettyinpink- (Napoleon Dynamite voice) LUCKY!
that's awesome
bunnyb
edie, let us know if you figure out the title of that book please? It strikes me as familiar!

mouse, I purchased The Blood of Flowers so it better be bloody good or I'm going to kick your ass! wink.gif

nickclick, I started but didn't finish it; I will return to it though. I know there are some BUSTies that have read it.

prettynpink, how was the book signing? I bought her latest for a friend's birthday next week but I haven't read her myself.

Mr Pip was good but suddenly devastating.
edie52
I will Bunny, but I have a feeling I won't find it. I googled a bunch of different word combos and nothing came up. The wikipedia entry for "flaneur" is quite interesting, and has a bunch of links, but nothing about that book. Maybe it didn't get that big, and was only written about because it was local (though I can't even remember if it was in a Montreal paper or a Toronto paper).
looking
Now that the few members who are into name-calling, personal attacks, and bitter arguments have probably blocked me, let's continue with some worthwhile posts.

Here's an excellent book that I'm currently reading. You can download it at no cost, but if you really like it and want to play fair, buy your own hard copy. I'm providing this for educational and preview purposes. The hardcover has a list price of US$149.95, but used copies are available online (not from me). Another option would be to try to get it through your local library, in which case some of the following information should help.

Title: A Companion to Gender History (Blackwell Companions to History)
Blackwell Publishing Limited
Editors: Teresa A. Meade and Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks
ISBN 0631223932
2004-01-01
PDF (compressed in .zip format for download)
688 pages
2.05 MB (compressed size of download)

Description: A Companion to Gender History surveys the history of women around the world, studies their interaction with men in gendered societies, and looks at the role of gender in shaping human behavior over thousands of years. It contains both thematic essays, which demonstrate how gender has intersected with other historical topics, and chronological-geographic essays, which explore gender in one area of the world during a specific period. All the essays consider the importance of class, region, ethnicity, race, and religion to the formation of gendered societies.The contributions are written by scholars from across the world, including Canada, Britain, Australia, India, New Zealand, and the United States, as well as by scholars for whom English is not their first language. One of the key points to emerge from the volume as a whole is that no generalization about gender has applied to all times or all places.

Free Download Links:
http://depositfiles.com/files/1325395
and
http://rapidshare.com/files/45327633/CGH_-...N0631223932.zip

(Both links are active at the time of this posting, but they may disappear at any time.)

After downloading the ".zip" file, unzip it using a program like WinZip (shareware) or ExtractNow (freeware).
Get WinZip at: http://www.winzip.com/prodpagewz.htm
Get ExtractNow at: http://www.extractnow.com

For extracting like this (rather than compressing), I prefer ExtractNow. It's 1 MB in size, free, and easy to use. It supports ZIP, RAR, ISO, BIN, IMG, IMA, IMZ, 7Z, ACE, JAR, GZ, LZH, LHA, TAR, SIT archive formats. Most books on file-sharing sites are in .rar format, which WinZip can't handle. You can read more about ExtractNow and download it from its creator's website: http://www.extractnow.com.

The extracted ".pdf" book can be read on/off-line at your leisure using Adobe Reader (freeware). Get the newest version for your computer's Operating System at http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

Happy reading.
faerietails2
looking, as you can see from the lack of spam on here...a simple title will do. unless you intend to replace your entire post with a period like all your others?

Currently reading: Naomi Klein's The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. It's good, but a little redundant.

nicklick, I put it on hold at the library (there's a long line to get that book now). i'd never heard of it before lessing won the nobel.
mouse
*cowers in fear of bunny's wrath*

also, i love david rakoff right now. he is a really smart smartypants. oh, to be a middle-aged literary gay man....the people who could fall in love with me.... *sigh*
nickclick
QUOTE(faerietails2 @ Nov 6 2007, 06:42 PM) *
nicklick, I put it on hold at the library (there's a long line to get that book now). i'd never heard of it before lessing won the nobel.

me too, and me neither. thanks.
corduroy
faerietails, I saw the Klein book in a bookstore window here in town, and thought it looked really interesting. I read her book on globalization ("Fences and Windows", or something similar) and admired her deconstruction of the Seattle protests et al. I read most of it on the beach by my house, and got a horrendous sunburn from being totally distracted by her writing, so it must've been engaging. However, the new book will wait because I have an overflow already of books I haven't touched.

I'm reading (god) lots of science fiction by Orson Scott Card and I love it. love. it.

briannasoloski
I'm reading Eating Mangoes Naked by Sark. I'm not very far in, but so far it's been really inspirational.
anarch
I love Sark!

I just finished The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. It's one of those books I want to give to everyone I possibly can. Serious themes (it's set in Nazi Germany) but laugh out loud moments too. The audio version is fantastic, read by Allan Corduner, who co-starred in Mike Leigh's Gilbert & Sullivan movie Topsy Turvy.
faerietails2
Read Voices from Chernobyl this weekend. It's a bunch of oral histories from Chernobyl survivors, and it's sooooooo sad. It's so different reading about Chernobyl from the perspective of the people who are still living it.
bunnyb
The Blood of Flowers was such a good read so, mouse, I won't be kicking your ass this time wink.gif. I found the book to be visually splendid and it appealed to the senses as well as the sensual; the uses of colour, taste and smell were vivid and contributed much to the book's appeal. After any good book I feel empty and in a funk over what to read next and I feel that way now, after reading The Blood of Flowers.

anarch, I want to read The Book Thief soon as I know I'm going to adore it.

eta: faerietails, please let us know how you get on with The Golden Notebook; I really need to return to it.
roseviolet
While I was sick at my parents' house earlier this month, I finally got around to reading Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. It wasn't too deep & thought provoking, but it was enjoyable ... just the sort of thing one should read while sick.

I also just finished reading The Red Tent. I know I'm probably the last person here to read it, but I'm glad I finally got around to it! When I got to the end, I just wanted to reach out to Dinah & hug her.
sassygrrl
Rakoff is great.

My book crush lately is chuck klosterman... reading IV which is a basically his articles from SPIN, but still great. I would so date him--he even has the dorky coke bottle glasses.... not as great as "Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs..." but still awesome.

Reading Golden Compass before the movie comes out. Got the whole trilogy.

It's so awesome to come in here and get reccomendations. My book club always picks the normal NY Times sellers, and it gets pretty lame and depressing.


((book love)))
mandolyn
i just lent out the red tent to my coworker book fiend. i know he's going to love it.

i also lent him The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay. i can't wait for him to read it. i think i must needs read it again when he gives it back.

i'm still rather angry at him for turning me on to the outlander series. which i've been reading since AUGUST!!!

completely addicted. can't stop. on second-to-last book. want to visit scotland.
bunnyb
Hmph, mandolyn, and here was me thinking you wanted to visit me (and fina and soon to be zoya) wink.gif.

I've just posted The Red Tent to a friend for her birthday. I would give anything for it to be my first time reading it again.
faerietails2
mando sighting?! *waves* smile.gif

i just bought the red tent a couple of weeks ago for 50 cents at a library sale. and it's pristine! score!

maybe if i stopped checking out loads of books from the library, i could actually start reading the loads of new books sitting on my shelves. damn you, bookmooch!
nickclick
i was planning on reading the golden notebook next, but since it's gonna be like 20 years until all the holds are off at the library, i'll read the used copy of house of the spirits i picked up a few months ago. at work i'm researching a bio of pablo neruda, so i'm all interested in chile. cool thing about doing picture research for a children's book publisher, i get a 5th grade knowledge of many topics, and then get to follow up when a topic is interesting (often they're not - louisiana purchase, again? snore) but i read a few great books this way, many books i heard of but never got around to, most notably, the serpent and the rainbow, after researching a book about movie zombies!
vesicapisces
I'd be interested to hear what readers of Marquez's Love in the Time of Cholera think about the movie. I saw it last week and thought they did a good job of capturing the tone of his writing, but since I haven't read that one I can't speak to how well they handled the story...
bunnyb
I didn't even know there was a movie! It's not out here yet but I'll need to read the book before seeing it. I'm a huge GGM fan but Love in the Time of Cholera is one of his books I haven't read yet.

I've just finished The Abortionist's Daughter but Elisabeth Hyde and it was predictable but light and enjoyable. I read another of her books recently - Crazy as Chocolate- and I preferred that.

Now I'm finally going to read We Need to Talk About Kevin.
curioushair
QUOTE(nickclick @ Nov 21 2007, 02:30 PM) *
i was planning on reading the golden notebook next, but since it's gonna be like 20 years until all the holds are off at the library, i'll read the used copy of house of the spirits i picked up a few months ago. at work i'm researching a bio of pablo neruda, so i'm all interested in chile. cool thing about doing picture research for a children's book publisher, i get a 5th grade knowledge of many topics, and then get to follow up when a topic is interesting (often they're not - louisiana purchase, again? snore) but i read a few great books this way, many books i heard of but never got around to, most notably, the serpent and the rainbow, after researching a book about movie zombies!


I loved The Golden Notebook. Oddly enough, I wasn't put on a waiting list for it.

Right now I'm re-reading Prozac Nation for whatever reason.
faerietails2
Cholera was just released in theaters a couple of weeks ago (starring Javier Bardem...yum!). From what I hear, everyone who's read the book has hated the movie. I still wanna see it, though.

I checked out this book from the library about women who disguised themselves as men and fought in the Civil War. Looks interesting.

Have you all seen this? I kind of want it but 1) that price makes it ridiculously unattainable, especially when I could blow less than that on two nice mp3 players, 2) I don't know what kind of variety they have book-wise (if it's all just mainstream crap then it's so not worth it), and 3) I do love reading books the old-fashioned way. There's nothing like curling up with an actual book. But I think this would be great for when I'm dogsitting or travelling and don't want to lug around my books and magazines.
MaybeSparrow
I've also been mulling over reading The Golden Notebook.

Right now, for my Brit-lit class, I'm reading White Teeth. Its extremely good, and I highly highly recommend it. Zadie Smith really has a handle on the rhythm of natural conversation, and her humor is subtle yet clever....I find myself smiling a lot to myself while reading.
briannasoloski
I'm reading Crawling by Elisha Cooper. It's slow going, about a father's experiences during his daughter's first year of life. I'm not sure I'm going to finish it.
anarch
just finished ZZ Packer's short story collection Drinking Coffee Elsewhere. I loved three of the stories. The rest didn't draw me in so much, but there was still plenty for me to learn from her writing. The audio version read by Shirley Jordan is great.

Also, suggestions for people interested in intellectually stimulating podcasts (I'm posting this here because there was a question about podcasts a while back).
fuzzz_brain
QUOTE(MaybeSparrow @ Nov 23 2007, 10:17 PM) *
I've also been mulling over reading The Golden Notebook.

Right now, for my Brit-lit class, I'm reading White Teeth. Its extremely good, and I highly highly recommend it. Zadie Smith really has a handle on the rhythm of natural conversation, and her humor is subtle yet clever....I find myself smiling a lot to myself while reading.


Have you read On Beauty? I liked it even more than White Teeth. I was lucky enough to see her do a live reading in Phoenix last May and she's just as witty in person.

I just finished reading Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil in preparation for my trip to Savannah in January. Berendt is so good at worming his way into communities, he must be very charming in person.
faerietails2
I never did finish The Golden Notebook. I got about 150 pages in, but it felt like I wasn't ever getting anywhere. Reading 1 page felt like I'd been reading forever.

I just finished Sisterhood Interrupted (about the in-fighting in the women's movement), and it was good.

I'm flying home on Sunday, so I'm debating what to read on the plane. I might start Roald Dahl's Omnibus, but it's huge and heavy and I don't wanna drag it around. So maybe Cunt.
bunnyb
I really enjoyed On Beauty; it's one of my best reads this year.

I read Cormac McCarthy's The Road; which is bleak and disconcerting but beautifully written.

I'm reading We Need to Talk About Kevin and really enjoying it. I thought it would be an easy read, despite the subject matter (in the same vein as I imagine Jodi Picoult's latest about a school shooting would be), but it's well-written and dense. IMO it helps to be ambivalent about motherhood or a staunch child-free by choicer but I'd be interested to discuss it with someone who was a mother and/or pro motherhood.

I'm really looking forward to reading over the holidays and receiving new books (especially The Book Thief).
AdviceVixensRawk
Has anyone else read Ha Jin? I'm just finishing his latest and it's really quite substantial. Next is "Night" (can't believe I haven't read that one yet...)

Also, if anyone here is interested in fairy tales and/or YA novels, I'm posting my novel online and would really appreciate comments but please be kind if you're giving criticism as I tend to bruise easily... oh, never mind, gimme what you got. Lord knows it's taken me this long... rolleyes.gif

http://unknownmagic.blogspot.com/

Thanks ever so much!!!

(ps. it's so nice to see people reading so much after the current study on the massive decline of reading for pleasure!)
nickclick
QUOTE(faerietails2 @ Dec 13 2007, 10:15 PM) *
I'm flying home on Sunday, so I'm debating what to read on the plane. I might start Roald Dahl's Omnibus, but it's huge and heavy and I don't wanna drag it around. So maybe Cunt.

Cunt is great to read in public, for all the funny stares.
ImDancingBarefoot
Sassy and Bunny, have you guy finished the "His Dark Materials" trilogy yet? I wanted to read "The Golden Compass" before I was the movie (Yay, Armored Bears!) and then I had to read the next two.

Just finished reading "The Looking Glass" wars. It's a retelling of the Alice in Wonderland stories. It's also a trilogy but I'm trying to wait to read the second one until it comes out in paperback. That way I won't have to wait as long between book two and book three.

Oh, um, new to this thread (if I've posted here before it was ages ago). Love to read, been on a big Young Adult fantasy kick for much of this year. "Harry Potter", "His Dark Materials", now "Looking Glass Wars".
bunnyb
ImDancingBarefoot, I read His Dark Materials a couple of years ago but did plan to re-read before the movie... oh well, the best laid plans.

I didn't know The Looking Glass Wars was a trilogy; I have the first one.
mandolyn
has anyone read atonement? i'm having a hard time getting into it, but that may be cuz i've only been reading the friggin outlander books since august. (not finished yet, two to go, but so need a break!)

any other grab-ya-by-the-heart-and-won't-let-ya-go fiction suggestions would be desperately welcomed.
crazyoldcatlady
so, despite the bitter aftertaste secondary to Marisha Pessl's press coverage and my raging jealousy, i decided to buy & read Special Topics in Calamity Physics.

Oh. My. God.

I can't take it. The footnotes that are supposed to be "quirky" and "literary device-y" are wholly annoying (Special Topics in Calamity Physics, Pessl, Marisha, 2007, pp. 1-the whole fucking book). No character is appetizing to me, and I hope they all die a horrible death, and I hope Marisha is reduced to writing quips for Reader's Digest.

So, I'm going to finish the book out of principle. Prove me wrong, Pessl!

:::shakes fist at sky:::
slyjinks
I'm picking up on kind of an old topic here (the Love in the Time of Cholera movie/book debate). Love in the Time of Cholera is my absolute favourite book. I've read it dozens of times, I think, yet I enjoyed the movie. Usually, I hate movies based on books (I Am Legend was a horrible fucking mess), but I thought Love in the Time of Cholera did an okay job. They completely ignored some themes of the book to lighten up the movie (an old man having sex with an 11-12 year old, her later committing suicide), but I agree that they captured his tone very well.
roseviolet
Any Jasper Fforde fans out there? One of my friends recommended the Thursday Next series to me. I quickly ripped through The Eyre Affair and I went out & bought the 2nd book before I'd even finished the first. It's great, fun, light reading for those of us who've read the great English classics. The tone reminds me a lot of Terry Pratchett, which is a good thing in my opinion!
bunnyb
Jasper Fforde is great; I have his latest Thursday Next, First Among Sequels waiting to be read.

Read and was caught up in The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini and saw the film today. Both book and film are heartbreaking yet uplifting and a good but broad insight to life in Afghanistan (pre 9/11).

Now my nose is stuck in Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books.

Has anybody read any Camilla Gibb books? My boy's sis bought me Sweetness in the Belly for Christmas and I'm very much looking forward to reading it as she loved it and we have similar taste in books.


girlbomb
Shameless self-promotion: My new book, HAVE YOU FOUND HER, comes out in 12 days. Yoicks! And it's dirt cheap, too -- 9 bucks on Walmart.com. Oh, AND, it's even pretty good. It's about going back to the shelter where I lived as a teenager, and meeting this incredibly brilliant young junkie savant who I tried to adopt, until I discovered the jaw-dropping truth about her identity. Seriously crazy stuff! I hope some of you will be inspired to check it out.

In the meantime, I haven't read anything good at all lately. Read Stephen King's THE CELL, which was like a way suckier THE STAND. Come on, King. You don't need the money. Make it good, or don't make it at all. Sheesh.
nickclick
girlbomb, saw your interview in BUST ! can't wait to read it. i just started another book reviewed by BUST - Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary - and trying to finish it before i have to make up my mind and vote on super tuesday!
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