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anna k
I liked Blonde, even though it got depressing and slightly creepy at times. I used to be really into Joyce Carol Oates, but she has a habit of writing the same things over and over again.
bunnyb
I find that too, anna k, that she recycles a lot of the same themes (especially rape) and that the books can be incredibly depressing. After her last book I read (We Were the Mulvaneys) I felt reluctant to return to her any of her work ever again because of the bleak, hollow feeling she leaves inside me but Blonde comes highly recommended by a friend. Some of her books I have read though have been different in subject matter and not so bleak (Beasts definitely and The Tattooed Girl somewhat).

Oh, and for anybody who likes their young adult fiction with a bite (and is a vampire story lover) then Stephanie Meyer's Twilight saga is fantastic; I literally could not put these books down and read them all last week! eta: I'm so excited as discovered that it's not a trilogy -as I thought- but that there will be a fourth and final book published in August! I'm quite relieved as I didn't feel as if the storyline was fully resolved.
auralpoison
Ho-lee son of a motherless biskit! That was dope. And why did no one ever correct me on my pronunciation of "Nabakov"?
anna k
I haven't found too many interesting things to read lately. I haven't been interested in any recent memoirs about people's dysfunctional families (one about a woman growing up with a drug-addicted mother or complaining about love/friend/family relationships) or short story collections that veer on "quirky." I read through The Official Punk Rock Book of Lists, which was entertaining but mostly focused on old-school punk rockers with self-destructive habits. I'm going to scan some books at Borders today, like some old novels by Nathaneal West and Kate Colby's fictionalized biography on Jane Bowles. I'd also like to read Georges Bataille's Story of the Eye.
hellotampon
QUOTE(mouse @ Mar 24 2008, 05:47 AM) *
i've got the book equivalent of an earworm, i keep thinking about this series of books i read easily 15 years ago :/


I've had the same problem for 2 years! There's this book I read as a child about these pagan brothers and sisters who worshiped clay idols, and they lived on a crappy farm near a river that flooded every year. Their father and brother had to go to war, and somehow they got separated from their mother and had to flee. So they were traveling down the river in a little boat and after that it got really trippy and they met their god or something. I don't remember how it ended. I remember their family was being persecuted because they were "heathens," which I had to look up in the dictionary.

It wasn't that very long, and the cover of the book showed a watercolor picture of some vague blonde people rowing a boat, and the title was like, "The ______________s." It's been driving me crazy for the longest time! I've googled it like 700x but I always come up with stupid Bible or American Idol bullshit.
girlbomb
Argh! I wish I could help out with the names of some of those long-missing books, but I can't. My own book-earworm is about a kid whose parents went to New York on vacation and left him with the grandparents, but the grandparents weren't home or something, so the kid goes to New York to try to find the parents, and just misses them or something, and he has to make his way back across the country by himself. The part I remember best is when he meets a guy whose house is in the dead center of the contiguous 48 states. I think there might be a horse involved too. Chances are fair that I made the whole thing up, but I'm pretty sure I read this book, and I can't remember the goddamn name.
lunia666
Does anybody recommend The Ruins by Scott Smith ???
I also have a book earworm sorry I can't help with yours .
Mine is about two friends one is a hedgehog the other a rabbit. The book tells stores about the two . The two I remember are one where they baby-sit the hedgehogs brother and sister at the end they but them in the pockets of a pair of overalls hanging on a clothes line and rock them to sleep. The other is about a treasure hurt. Any way I loved this book as a kid but don't remember the tittle.

mornington
what happened to the famous five...


eek, there's going to be a final book in twighlight? yay! *dances* I loved those books, they're fantastic.
damona
i just finished reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver. pretty good book. it's a non-fiction about the authors family and how they decided to change their eating habits to be more environmentally friendly. they eat almost entirely, homegrown, homemade foods for a year, and realize that it's not that hard after all. it's a really interesting book and i just really want to run outside and start a garden now!
knorl05
just picked up Selected Poems of Anne Sexton. wonderful.

edit: hmm. not so wonderful perhaps. i really identify with her struggle. but her poetry falls flat with me. and to dissect her life further, she came from a privileged home and wasnt so revolutionary in her choices. she accomplished a lot but that could also be due to the fact that she came from money and had those connections and opportunities. i'm not negating her struggles, or her talent, and she still holds a place within that only her memory can fill.... but i'm not so blown away by her anymore.
sesame
For those of you with the book earworms, I found this site a year or so ago when I had one. I used the search function and found the book I was looking for, but if you don't find yours you can submit a "book stumper" for a small fee. I hope you find yours!
bunnyb
I have another earworm: a YA book years ago with a female protagonist called Cherry, which is all I remember...

Is it too early to be planning my summer reading? I'm going to Florida for three weeks in July (two weeks in Orlando and one week on the beach with long, indirect, flights there so plenty of reading time) and thinking about what to pack. I want something gripping, a great story but not an easy read that I won't finish in a few days as I want the books to last me and plan to take no more than three (I can always go to a bookstore to pick up more though and may still). I've been reading and enjoying Salman Rushdie's latest The Enchantress of Florence and picked up some more of his books as they were on 3 for 2 offer and I thought maybe something by him; I've only read Midnight's Children and class it as one of my all time favourites and was thinking maybe The Satanic Verses, Shalimar's Clown or Shame. I also considered bringing along Ada or Ador by Nabokov (mouse recommended ages ago) but I don't know if that is way too heavy for holiday and whether I should pack more fun books. I really want another book like The Red Tent, Fall on Your Knees or On Beauty. Other ideas included Wally Lamb's She's Come Undone or The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingslover; I'm thinking popular book group choices wink.gif. Any suggestions?
roseviolet
Oh my goodness, I could not get through She's Come Undone. Maybe I'm too sensitive, but there are some passages in that book that are so vivid and painful for me. It's been a decade since I tried to read that book, but there are parts of the story that still haunt me. All that being said, I know people who finished it and loved it. Just be prepared that it can be very disturbing at times.

Right now I'm reading a bit of fluff called Lonely Werewolf Girl by Martin Miller. Yes, there are werewolves in it and the occasional death, but it's also light and amusing. It's great warm weather reading.
knorl05
has anyone read the bell jar by sylvia plath?

edit: bunnyb, and how was it?
bunnyb
knorl, many, many, years ago.
anna k
I recently reread The Bell Jar. It still is a strong and emotional novel to read. I read it because I wanted to timetravel to the 1950s and what it was like to be a young female writer in Manhattan, placing myself in the story.

I just finished Jennifer Weiner's Certain Girls. Most of it was entertaining, though the ending really surprised me.

I also read Damage Control, an anthology of female writers about their experiences with hairdressers, manicurists, waxers, acupuncturists, tattoo artists, makeup artists, etc. It was pretty good, and featured an assortment of writers, from authors to actresses (Minnie Driver, Rose McGowan) to beauty professionals themselves.
auralpoison
She's Come Undone. Wow. I read that on a big roadtrip. I went with a girl I thought I knew, but really didn't until that trip. And I didn't like what I found out. But she'd brought the tome with her, & to avoid her as best I could in a small space I read it. Talk about a read. There were sveral parts where I silently cried because the emotions it aroused were so strong.

The part that really struck me, though, is weird. Her grandmother is on a bus & her hand accidentally touches a black person's hair. She remarks how surprised she was that it was so unexpectedly soft.

Reading Special topics in Calamity Physics, some Palahniuk, the last Sebold.
GirlFilth
The Glass Castle. I still have about 65 pages to go, but it is one of the most eye opening reads I have read in some time. I always wanted to read The Bell Jar and The Grapes of Wrath. Still in love with Great Expectations and anything by Edgar Allan Poe (I have both those compilations - poetry/prose and the short stories.) Gonna Read the rest of this post, I'm a book-aholic. wink.gif
bunnyb
Sounds as if She's Come Undone wouldn't make good holiday reading ... would people recommend Philippa Gregory books as being what I'm looking for?
fuzzz_brain
QUOTE(knorl05 @ Apr 12 2008, 10:55 AM) *
just picked up Selected Poems of Anne Sexton. wonderful.

edit: hmm. not so wonderful perhaps. i really identify with her struggle. but her poetry falls flat with me. and to dissect her life further, she came from a privileged home and wasnt so revolutionary in her choices. she accomplished a lot but that could also be due to the fact that she came from money and had those connections and opportunities. i'm not negating her struggles, or her talent, and she still holds a place within that only her memory can fill.... but i'm not so blown away by her anymore.


If you really want to be blown away, read the autobiography by her daughter, Linda Gray Sexton called Making My Way Back to Mercy Street. You really begin to see a very interesting(and terrifying) side of Anne Sexton, and travel with her brave daughter.

I just finished The Kiss by Kathryn Harrison. About her incestuous (slightly) consensual relationship with her absent father that began in her 20's. Beautiful stark prose that doesn't go for shock value. In the end, the book is really about her struggles with her mother. Brilliant.
kittenb
QUOTE(bunnyb @ Apr 27 2008, 03:21 PM) *
Sounds as if She's Come Undone wouldn't make good holiday reading ... would people recommend Philippa Gregory books as being what I'm looking for?


Yes! Yummy rich reads. My favs, so far, are The Other Bolyn Girl & The Bolyn Inheritance.
vixen_within
QUOTE(anarch @ Apr 4 2008, 04:56 PM) *



I love this and the whole aesthetic that those writers have in interview, back when cigarettes puffed leaning back and casual were the height of sophistication. He didn't give the answers I expected.

This post inspired me to look up a good satisfying Toni Morrison interview on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TsqzajdlyNw

GirlFilth, I have The Glass Castle on my shelf waiting to be read but the beginning of it did capture me pretty quickly.
anna k
I read a good biography of Bette Davis, called Dark Victory. I wanted to know more about her life and films.

I'm in the middle of Lost Genius: The Story of a Forgotten Musical Maverick, a biography about a forgotten Hungarian pianist named Ervin Nyiregyhazi, who was a child prodigy in the 1910s, heavily coddled and sheltered by his mother, and grew up into a childish and selfish individual, unable to cut his own food or button his shirt, developing an alcohol problem and obsession with sex, and living in poverty while performing at various places. His mother really fucked him up, but he comes off as such an obnoxious asshole that I don't care that he's obscure.
femikneesm
I've been lurking on this forum for a long time - thought I'd better say thanks for all the books I've picked up due recommendations from Busties - such as Fall on Your Knees, We Need to Talk About Kevin and Water for Elephants - I loved them all.

I'm very excited about the new Girlbomb book. I'll be ordering it from Amazon post haste.

Some great books I've read recently include Bastard out of Carolina and Trash by Dorothy Allison, Dahlia Season by Myriam Gurba, Trumpet by Jackie Kay and Foxfire by Joyce Carol Oates. I've just also just finished Shimmer by Sarah Schulman - it's wonderfully written.

I am now on a Michelle Tea kick and am reading everything she has written - so far I think Passionate Mistakes and Rose of No Man's Land are her best works - highly recommended.
vixen_within
femikneesm said:I am now on a Michelle Tea kick and am reading everything she has written - so far I think Passionate Mistakes and Rose of No Man's Land are her best works - highly recommended.

ooh, i haven't read her more literary stuff - just started reading Rent Girl and really like the approach she took with the topic. you can tell that she's a poet by the way she collaborated using the art work to frame her words; those broad strokes with red and black.
femikneesm
QUOTE(vixen_within @ May 5 2008, 11:09 PM) *
femikneesm said:I am now on a Michelle Tea kick and am reading everything she has written - so far I think Passionate Mistakes and Rose of No Man's Land are her best works - highly recommended.

ooh, i haven't read her more literary stuff - just started reading Rent Girl and really like the approach she took with the topic. you can tell that she's a poet by the way she collaborated using the art work to frame her words; those broad strokes with red and black.



Rent Girl is one of the only ones I haven't read now - still trying to get a copy....I've heard very mixed reviews of it, so good to get your take on it.
vixen_within
QUOTE(femikneesm @ May 6 2008, 03:13 AM) *
Rent Girl is one of the only ones I haven't read now - still trying to get a copy....I've heard very mixed reviews of it, so good to get your take on it.



Well, we'll see how it goes...I think it deserves attention merely for being a breakthrough format for its "genre" (sex worker memoir).
pollystyrene
QUOTE(bunnyb @ Apr 3 2008, 06:08 PM) *
Oh, and for anybody who likes their young adult fiction with a bite (and is a vampire story lover) then Stephanie Meyer's Twilight saga is fantastic; I literally could not put these books down and read them all last week! eta: I'm so excited as discovered that it's not a trilogy -as I thought- but that there will be a fourth and final book published in August! I'm quite relieved as I didn't feel as if the storyline was fully resolved.


There was a story on NPR about this today- here. I hadn't heard about them before. Interesting that the writer is a Mormon. I trust your judgement, bunny- this isn't religious propaganda wrapped up in a YA facade, is it? Is the writing as good as J.K.?
bunnyb
Mmmm, it puts an interesting spin on her use of abstinence in the novels but I definitely don't think it's remotely propaganda-like, polly. As for her writing being as good as J.K.'s... I am reluctant to compare anything with HP because it's so popular but J.K. lucked out because she's not a wonderful writer but she tells a fantastic story that you can lose yourself in and Meyer certainly does that too. There are few series that I have read all in the space of a few days or a week and can't stop thinking about and both HP (the first four I read in a week; I was late to the party) and Twilight are on that list. Mornington is a fan too! There's also going to be a film of Twilight (the first in the series) later this year with the actor who played Cedric Diggory playing Edward Cullen, the male lead; this disappoints me as I didn't envisage Edward looking as he does, I saw him as more of a blonde, chiselled-jawed, translucent GOD laugh.gif.
anna k
I never read Robert Cormier's The Chocolate War before, and thought it was fantastic. Bleak in the disillusioned post-war 1970s, I could practically feel Jerry getting the hell beaten out of him from Emile's thugs. I kept imagining that Jerry would grow up to become an alcoholic, womanizing, misanthrope, a grizzled badass like Gregory Corso or Charles Bukowski.

I also read Pattie Boyd's memoir Wonderful Tonight, about her 1960s modeling life and marriages to George Harrison and Eric Clapton. The stories were interesting more because of the time and the men she was with, not so much Pattie herself. I thought she'd be more interesting or wilder or cooler, but she seemed lame to me. I kept wanting her to leave Clapton because he was a drunk jackass (he seemed to be an alcoholic for about 20 years). She also didn't seem to care much about her husbands' music, except for the songs they wrote about her. They just made her seem shallow.
anna k
Now I'm in the middle of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. I never read it before, and I like it a lot. It's a bit of a mindtrip to be to put myself in the 1900s Brooklyn, getting used to everything costing a few cents and a quarter being enough to buy a whole meal. I like how Betty Smith puts adult situations in the childrens' lives without being preachy or obvious about it, like a violin teacher who fetishizes little girls' feet or a prostitute who approaches Francie and her father. The whole book is brilliant, and I'm not surprised that Joan Blondell played Aunt Sissy in the film version, she had a flirty/smartass appeal about her that worked for Sissy.
anna k
Am I the only poster here?

I finished A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. It was really great and I got wrapped up in the story.

Now I'm reading Frank Zappa's biography. I only know a few of his songs (Dirty Love, Peaches en Regalia, Valley Girl, Why Does It Hurt When I Pee), and I like reading about him, even though I'm not a musician or as knowledgable of jazz or classical musicians as Zappa and his friends were/are. My brother got into music as a teen and introduced me to Herbie Hancock, Larry Carlton, Jaco Pastorious, and Stanley Clarke, though I only know assorted songs by them.
i_am_jan
QUOTE(crazyoldcatlady @ Jan 4 2008, 02:40 AM) *
so, despite the bitter aftertaste secondary to Marisha Pessl's press coverage and my raging jealousy, i decided to buy & read Special Topics in Calamity Physics.

Oh. My. God.

I can't take it. The footnotes that are supposed to be "quirky" and "literary device-y" are wholly annoying (Special Topics in Calamity Physics, Pessl, Marisha, 2007, pp. 1-the whole fucking book). No character is appetizing to me, and I hope they all die a horrible death, and I hope Marisha is reduced to writing quips for Reader's Digest.

So, I'm going to finish the book out of principle. Prove me wrong, Pessl!

:::shakes fist at sky:::


crazyoldcatlady: I was reading through posts here trying to get some ideas on what to read next and I saw this post. I could have written the same exact post about that book. I actually PUT IT DOWN after getting about 1/4 of the way through it and so I am wondering if you finished it and whether it ever seemed to be worth the excellent reviews I was surprised it had. I mean, the characters for me were so. annoying. that I hated them. Blue, the main character, had the whole daddy's girl / "i'm so overprotected by my daddy" thing going on which always annoys me anyhow, but she droned on and on about it...I was like OKAY. WE GET IT. go sit on his lap or give the guy a back rub or something. And it was in first person but like, who talks like that? It came off to me as a bunch of name-dropping by a know-it-all twit trying to please EVERYBODY ever to be a literary snob. Then I had her dad pictured in my head as that annoying dude on Magnum P.I., Higgins. Now putting down a book is not a thing that I do...if I've invested more than several hours in a book, I'm readin' it. This book was an exception. I was reading a couple better things at the time and simply decided to devote myself to them, my logic being that if I hated it 1/4 of the way through, it couldn't come back from that.
bunnyb
...
bunnyb
Special Topics in Calamity Physics was pretentious, too literary self aware, irritating twaddle. I'm still angry over that one.

anna_k I'm here but I miss the great discussions and recommendations that used to be in this thread I've been considering reading A Tree Grows in Brooklyn for a few weeks.

I'm still looking for the ultimate summer read whilst enjoying some light fun reading in Jasper Fforde's Nursery Crime Adventures series.

Next I'm going to read Andrey Kurkov's Death and the Penguin.
roseviolet
Bunny, I think I'm going to read the Nursery Crime series next (I already own The Fourth Bear). Currently I'm slowly trickling through Eat Pray Love. My mom gave it to my for my birthday and it seemed really imprtant to her that I read it, so I've chosen to digest it slowly.
femikneesm
Special Topics has been on my list of books to read for ages - perhaps I'll give it a miss...

I've just finished reading Carol by Patricia Highsmith - I think it's published in the US as The Price of Salt. It was an interesting read, not least because it offers a glimpse into the lives of lesbians in 1950 New York. It took me a long time to warm to the characters, but by the end I was fond of them. Perhaps the most interesting thing about the book is that it has a happy ending - not, I gather, the norm for books published in the 50s dealing with gay themes.

I'm now reading Godspeed by Lynn Breedlove, from the band Tribe 8....I thought it would be a bit pretentious actually, but I am really enjoying it. I think she's a promising novelist - it's punk, and dark, and funny. I picked it up because of a review from Michelle Tea.
auralpoison
Cripes. Here I was feeling guilty for um, completely abandoning Special Topics. I'd only ever not completed one book in my life (Etidorpha, John Uri Loyd. Masonic scifi claptrap.) & Special Topics now makes it two.
sybarite
Yeah, I've considered Special Topics and it just sounds so offputting.

I did like A Tree Grows in Brooklyn: I first read it when I was 12 or so and I'm sure many of the references went right over my young head. It made an impression on me though.

I've just ordered some books for my upcoming holiday, including Uncommon Arrangements by Katie Roiphe, which has been described as a nose through literary marriages. I also ordered Isabel Fonesca's novel Attachment for beach reading and something called All We Ever Wanted was Everything, which sounded kind of bitchy and intriguing. Anyone read any of these?
bunnyb
rose, the Nursery Crimes series is really good! I think they are just as good as Thursday Next, possibly funnier.

sybarite, your holiday reading list sounds great. I read a Guardian article about Uncommon Arrangements recently and I'd like to read it at some point.

ap, you definitely do not need to feel guilty! It was a let-down.

femiknessm, I have had Carol on my to read list for a couple of years now after a friend highly recommended it; I really need to get around to reading it.

I finalised my holiday reading list! I bought a paperback copy of Blonde to read (I had borrowed a hardback copy from the library and it stayed on my bedside not being read because it was too cumbersome) and I'm also going to pack Jonathan Coe's House of Sleep, Khaled Hosseini'sA Thousand Splendid Suns and Victoria Hislop's The Return (out the week before I go on holiday and I'm sure it will make a great beach read; The Island was such an engrossing and enjoyable read and I have high hopes that this will be too).

I also want to purchase and read The Behaviour of Moths by Poppy Adams. There is something about the synopsis which reminds me of Margaret Atwood's Blind Assassin.
i_am_jan
Can anyone recommend a good, humerous (can be serious underneath, like black comedy) book for me to read. I have been reading too many serious things lately, such as William Faulkner's "The Sound And The Fury" (which, by the way, I do recommend for several reasons: its challenging form and organization (it is arranged in a way that it takes a while to figure out what's going on); the style is stream of consciousness so it's interesting to hear the uncensored dialogues going on in a mind, very provocative, makes you want to listen to your own mind a bit more closely and see what and whose voices you might hear; the setting is different, (the deep south in the 1920s during a rather transitional period in human history, in ways); the characters seem like people you've known before, are very real, vivid...this is a book that you can't put down easily...it IS challenging yet not too deliberately cryptic that a decent reader can't figure it out (no unnecessary weird literary devices put there simply for the sake of putting it there...there is a POINT to this form) ... it leaves you with some nice nature visuals that you won't soon forget ... there are several interesting female archetypes and some feminist themes even though it was written by a male writer and I liked that...it delved deeply into a wide range of my emotions and subconscious. I am probably one of like, 5 people here who han't read this one, I know...

anyway, again, just looking for a recommendation for something that could make me laugh and be really clever, if anyone has suggestions. P.S. My favorite books are "Pride and Prejudice" and "Lolita," (I've read these so much they have me spoiled for other novels. (Join the club, right?),
femikneesm
I am jan - Have you tried Augusten Burroughs? I find him very entertaining and funny in a dark sort of way, although apparently his new one is a bit of a departure in that it is not very humorous - I've just ordered it from Amazon.

My other fave funny/light reading books are any of the Adrian Mole diaries...I've read them more times than I can count, they are absolute classics and highly diverting.

Speaking of diverting - bunnyb, I absolutely adored Blonde. Could not put it down. In fact, I was on a train reading it once going home from work and was so engrossed that I continued to read, completely oblivious to the fact that I was three stops past where I should have gotten off....that hasn't happened to me before! I am a Marilyn Monroe fan, but I don't think you need to be to enjoy the book. Let me know what you think of it.
i_am_jan
femikneesm: thank you very much for the recomm's...I've just reserved Adrian Mole at the library (the collection of the diaries in one volume). It sounds very promising and just what I was looking for! I shall report back tongue.gif
femikneesm
i am jan - I am very excited for you to be reading them for the first time (and jealous!) and will be curious to hear what you think of them.
damona
hi y'all, how's it goin'? good, good.... so... i've got a question...

my oldest son is a big reader. problem is, i don't really have a whole bunch of kid-appropriate books for him to read. he's only 9, but he's read the whole harry potter series, a couple hardy boys books, inumerable pokemon books (blech), 20,000 leagues under the sea, a couple kid-aimed king arthur tales and is currently plowing his way thru the chronicles of narnia series. there's other stuff he's read, but these are the biggies.

my question is this... can anyone recommend some good books to look for for him for this summer? at his age i was reading stuff like babysitters club and sweet valley high (and i made fun of the pokemon stuff... *hangs head*) as well as nancy drews and stuff like gone with the wind. i have no idea what a boy would like! he's expressed interest in greek mythology and cave art, as well as the aforementioned king arthur tales, but our local library runs heavily to romance novels and picture books and not much else. my husband has only recently discovered the thrill of a good book, so he's no real help. somebody, please, advise me! boys are such completely different creatures!
ChingusKhan
Bought my daughter - she's 11 - "The Golden Compass". Great book. Female protaganist, though... I don't know if you can find them where you live, but when I was your boy's age, I read every single "TinTin" graphic novel I could get my hands on.

On another note, I am reading a tremendous book! Called "The Blank Slate; The Modern Denial of Human Nature" by Stephen Pinker. Very, very good reading and very interesting. Pinker is an Harvard prof in pyshcology (Can't spell to save my ass!) and the book's premise is that there is no such thing as a "blank slate" when it comes to human behavior. Pinker believes and writes that much - most - of what we are and how we behave is determined by our genes. We're hardwired from birth, according to Pinker.

It is an extremely interesting read and, I must confess, it fits with my own personal observations. I was - in the the day - at the bottom end of the elite athlete spectrum. I tell people I got good enough to know that I wasn't that good. In elite athletics, at some point, most get to a point where they know that all the work, trying and coaching won't get them any farther. You got what you got and there ain't no way you're getting to the next level.

And, too, as a man in my mid-40's, with a mother, a sister, a wife, a daughter and lots of women friends, I am more and more convinced that - as genders - we both live on the same planet but we live in separate worlds.
damona
chinquskhan, thanks for the idea! i never thought of the golden compass. we have the trilogy, so i'll hand those over to him next. that also sounds like an interesting book you're reading. i'm fascinated by such things myself.

anybody else have any other ideas for my son? it's a long summer and he's a fast reader!
kittenb
damona - has he read the Hobbit? Any of the Lord of the Rings series? Sounds like he likes fantasy. Might as well go with the classics.
bunnyb
Damona, what about the Narnia series? For other modern fantasy I would heartily recommend The Belgariad series (and its follow-up The Mallorean) by David Eddings; Terry Pratchett's younger Discword series is particularly good - The Wee Free Men, A Hat Full of Sky and Wintersmith or some of his other children books - and maybe some Philip Pullman or Garth Nix if you can buy his books in the States.

Let us know what you go for and what he thinks!

Has anybody read Cloud Atlas? I've to read it for book group. Just now I am finishing off Sophie Dahl's Playing with the Grown-ups, which is a good but not overly-taxing read but that's exactly what I'm needing. Early on a few phrases or motifs here and there reminded me of Roald Dahl, who I love.
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