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cinegirl
QUOTE(tommynomad @ Mar 20 2007, 12:54 PM) *

Just wrapped up the audiobook version of Neuromancer, which is still the best male-authored SF I've ever read.


You should check out the sequels, Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive. I was obsessed with these books in college--my very first screen name was "razorgirl," way back in 1992...
sybarite
I've been a big fan of William Gibson (Neuromancer and other books mentioned below). I actually really liked his most recent (I think) book, Pattern Recognition. Way milder in tone and technobabble, it's an engaging and oddly sweet read.
sesame
I finished Fall on Your Knees. Wow. It was like rolling downhill in a wagon. You start out kind of slow and a little uneasy, then you gain some speed and you start to get a little scared and think about dumping over on purpose. But you keep going, and you get more terrified and exhilarated going faster and faster and you think for sure you're going to hit a rock and fly out and break your neck.... But then you reach the gentle grassy slope at the bottom and you just slow to a gentle stop and you can't stop thinking about what a great ride that was.

Whew.

bunnyb
sesame, LOVE that analogy!
doxy
Just finished Sophie's Choice. Seems she didn't really have one of her own until the end, still thinking about it.
Good book, though, very sad. Wondering about the author...is Lie Down In Darkness really that good?

Reading Battle of New Orleans now. Borrowed it and so I have to get it over-with.
Seems I'll be picking up Fall on Your Knees next? Might make a good birthday present.
euphorically
Its great to get suggestions from this board!

I haven't read anything wonderful recently. Any suggestions? Has anyone read Shantaram or The Book Thief? I loved both of those last year..

I have a book blog, if anyone is interested. It is http://bookedy.blogspot.com
pollystyrene
Mouse, I like Anne Tyler. I've only read a couple of them, but Saint Maybe is one of my all-time favorites.
mouse
oh, that's the one i just finished! they're so sad, but at the same time so goddamn heartwarming which is why i distrust them. i loved "a slipping down life"; by far her best that i've read. i rented the movie and even though it stars lily taylor AND guy pearce, who are two of my favorite actors, they changed so many things about it i couldn't finish watching it sad.gif
meabh
I recently finished Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman and am now reading Stardust.
Neil is a genius of an author. I can't believe I've never heard of him before BPAL.
bunnyb
meabh, Neverwhere is fantastic but American Gods is even better!

euphorically, great blog! I've been wanting to read The Book Thief
cinegirl
Nice blog, euphorically! I just added you to my blogroll. Looks like we did the same "have you read these books?" thingy...
bunnyb
Reading and really enjoying Margaret Atwood's The Penelopiad.
grenadine
bunny, is that new? i love a lot of atwood (the handmaid's tale, the robber bride), but i couldn't get into oryx and crake (*ducks tomatoes*). how would you compare it?

i just read anne lamott's second book about religion (which was predictably syrupy-yet-readable) because we're going to give it to my MIL for a birthday present. i always feel as though i binged on angel cake after reading her... but while i was in the shop i saw the new david mitchell novel, black swan green, which i splurged and bought and am happy to say is another book that makes me think there is hope for the modern novel. (despite the unfortunate and irrelevant comparisons to salinger on the cover blurb.)
bunnyb
QUOTE(grenadine @ Mar 28 2007, 08:40 PM) *
bunny, is that new? i love a lot of atwood (the handmaid's tale, the robber bride), but i couldn't get into oryx and crake (*ducks tomatoes*). how would you compare it?


grenadine, it's a couple of years old and I read it in a day! Differs from her other work that I've read (not much; and I only managed to get half-way through Oryx and Crake although I'll give it another try); it's based on Greek mythology, taking the story of Penelope and the untold story of her twelve murdered (by Odysseus) maids. It's a very easy read whilst being satisfying and making one think; I found it to be quite feminist in its narrative, hence why I enjoyed it. Some of the book (it's quite short - less than 200 pages) is written in verse form where the maids take the form of a Greek chorus. I could maybe have done with it being longer.

I'm now reading A Room With a View by E. M. Forster.
grenadine
it IS fate. but call it italy if it pleases you.
EllaMinnowPea
BunnyB, I just read Atwood's Susanna Moodie, and really enjoyed it. Her essays/books about the process of writing it are interesting, too! ...Never finished Oryx and Crake either, but it was much darker than the other novels I was reading at that time and I didn't really mean to abandon it. Maybe I'll try again. Handmaid's Tale was brilliant.

I loved "The Glass Essay" and have moved into Autobiography of Red by Anne Carson. Anyone else fallen for her?
vesicapisces
QUOTE(grenadine @ Mar 28 2007, 05:01 PM) *
it IS fate. but call it italy if it pleases you.


biggrin.gif
roseviolet
[melts a little]

Damn, I love that line!

Speaking of Italy, have any of you read Under the Tuscan Sun? The author lives near me, so I'm kinda intrigued. Ya know, in case I meet her at the post office or something. biggrin.gif
curioushair
QUOTE(grenadine @ Mar 28 2007, 07:40 PM) *
i just read anne lamott's second book about religion (which was predictably syrupy-yet-readable) because we're going to give it to my MIL for a birthday present. i always feel as though i binged on angel cake after reading her... but while i was in the shop i saw the new david mitchell novel, black swan green, which i splurged and bought and am happy to say is another book that makes me think there is hope for the modern novel. (despite the unfortunate and irrelevant comparisons to salinger on the cover blurb.)


I feel the same way about Anne Lamott. The only book of hers I was able to get through and still keep most of my sanity was Bird By Bird, and that was only because it was required for a writing class I was taking.

Finish (-ing, sort of) Jonathan Lethem's new one, You Don't Love Me Yet. Big disappointment.
Finished Julia Sheeres's Jesus Land. Loved it, breezed through it in a couple days despite the harrowing subject material.

(Egads, that post is a few OMGs short of being a text message. Sorry 'bout that. LOL.)
kittenb
I am reading Woman: An Intimate Geography by Natalie Angier. I am beyond loving it. I want to marry this book and raise little happy girl children. I really want to buy it for every woman I know so that we can dance around singing "I love my uterus! My vagina is beautiful!"
anna k
I'm enjoying Happy Birthday or Whatever, a memoir by Annie Choi about growing up as the child of Korean immigrant parents in L.A. I like her mom a lot, she's very unique and funny. I read over her pissing of Titanic twice because I cracked up loud. I like learning more about Korea through Annie's writings, it's like learning about Peru through Gabriella de Ferrari's memoir or Cambodia through Loung Ung's memoir. It also reminds me of being in summer camp at 11 with a Korean-American girl and her Korean cousins who didn't speak English. I saw someone speak English to them and they seemed to understand, so I did the same, until their American cousin snapped at me, "They don't understand you."

QUOTE
"What happen?"

Leonardo DiCaprio is in love with the girl, and other guy doesn't like it."

"Which one Leo Decrap?"

"The short, blond one - yellow hair - with the big head."

"Why that man tie Big Head to table? Why they fight?"

"Because he's in love with the girl, too."

"I not understand - why they fight now? Boat sink, who care? Everyone drown and they fight? This movie so silly."

"Mom, shh, there's still another hour."

"Hour? Oh my gosh, how? Boat sink in ten, fifteen minute!"
nickclick
tee hee! that's great; i frickin' hate that movie.

what's the title of the peru memoir? i'm hoping to plan a trip to peru this summer and i'd like to read any lit that's recommended.
anna k
Gringa Latina by Gabriella de Ferrari. It's about her life being raised in Peru by Italian parents. She was raised in the 1950s, so her experiences may be very far off from what Peru may be like today, if it is more gentrified or urbanized.
kelkello
I'm late on this one, but Oryx and Crake was fantastic! I loved it. I had a hard time, however, getting through the Blind Assassin.

I'm looking for books that will make me laugh like a hyena. I've already read everything by David Sedaris, Augusten Burroughs, Laurie Notaro (she has a new one coming out soon) and I've read the John Hodgeman book (laughed until I nearly peed myself). Now I'm looking for more funny. Novels, essays, whatever. Any recommendations?
AKirstin
"Youth in Revolt" by CD Payne is one of the funniest books I've EVER read. There are sequels, but I've yet to read them.

The Shopaholic series by Sophie Kinsella made me laugh a lot.
bunnyb
kel, the only funny I read is Terry Pratchett but some of the BUSTies in here swear by Christopher Moore and his books do sound fiendishly funny.
kelkello
I read Chris Moore's Island of the Sequined Love Nun. And I read Youth in Revolt ages ago. Maybe I should reread it. I read Good Omens by Pratchett and Gaiman. Doesn't Pratchett have a series? What order to they run in?
bunnyb
kel, Pratchett has the long (and still-running) Discworld series that runs in mini-series (the guards, the witches etc.) The first is The Colour of Money and any copy will give you the running order although I haven't read them in sequence.
curioushair
QUOTE(AKirstin @ Apr 8 2007, 06:52 PM) *
"Youth in Revolt" by CD Payne is one of the funniest books I've EVER read. There are sequels, but I've yet to read them.


Oh, thank you for mentioning Youth in Revolt. I bought that book over a year ago and I still haven't gotten around to finishing it.
faerietails2
I'm reading The Eden Express by Mark Vonnegut right now and I'm loving it. I was born in the wrong era. *sigh*

QUOTE(anna k @ Apr 6 2007, 01:23 AM) *
Gringa Latina by Gabriella de Ferrari. It's about her life being raised in Peru by Italian parents. She was raised in the 1950s, so her experiences may be very far off from what Peru may be like today, if it is more gentrified or urbanized.


Well, may I direct you AWAY from Mario Vargas Llosa? He's one of the most famous writers from Peru, but he's a racist ass (in life and in writing)! blink.gif dry.gif
anna k
I recently read Sam Shepard's play Fool for Love. It was interesting and I kept thinking of the original actors Kathy Baker and Ed Harris in my mind as I read it.
raisingirl
RV, I've read Under the Tuscan Sun and I highly recommend it. I think you would really like it, especially with your recent house hunting. It was such a pleasurable read, better than her second book about Tuscany. (I have not and will not see the movie, BTW.) It made me want to visit, which I haven't done yet! One of these years I'll get around to doing it. Maybe not buying a house, but definitely visiting. And I saw FM speak at a book festival outdoors in the late spring several years ago (it was an a propos setting if ever there was one); it was humorous to attach her southern drawl with her prose.

Tried as I might, I could not get through the first 50 pages of Confessions of a Shopaholic. All the mentions of brand names, etc., just seemed so forced. Ugh.

I recently read one Calvin Trillin book and now I want to read more! Currently reading an Elinor Lipman book (go ahead and laugh at me, but her writing is fun).
AKirstin
Yeah, I can see how the name-brand mentions could get on your nerves. That's how I felt about "American Psycho".
crazyoldcatlady
books that have heavy name/product dropping don't usually become favs of mine, because generally they don't hold up over time. now, if it's being used in in appropriate/historical context or for plot development, then i'm ok.

went to used book store this weekend. cleaned up for relatively cheap.

black like me - reading now, amazing. it's incredible how much has/hasn't changed since the 50's, regarding both race and other cultural aspects
the girl who loved tom gordon - by stephen king, guilty pleasure
lovely bones - by seabold
the game - by byatt
if you want to write - by ueland, i think i enjoy reading books about writing more than writing sometimes
the liars' club - by karp

also bookmooched the first sword of truth novel by terry goodkind. i heard good things, and it'll be my first foray into fantasy fiction
lapis
Hi, I don't know where to post this question, so please redirect me if this is the wrong place--and I apologize if this is the case. Can anyone suggest any primers on feminism that would be easy to read but also make some good points? I was thinking something by bell hooks because she's readable but am not sure if she's the best fit. The old school stuff seems dated but maybe could work. Basically, I have a friend who considers herself not feminist because of its pop-culture trappings but she thinks in very sensitive and potentially feminist ways--I just want to show her how feminism can look in theory and applied. Any suggestions?
faerietails2
QUOTE(lapis @ Apr 11 2007, 10:19 PM) *
Hi, I don't know where to post this question, so please redirect me if this is the wrong place--and I apologize if this is the case. Can anyone suggest any primers on feminism that would be easy to read but also make some good points? I was thinking something by bell hooks because she's readable but am not sure if she's the best fit. The old school stuff seems dated but maybe could work. Basically, I have a friend who considers herself not feminist because of its pop-culture trappings but she thinks in very sensitive and potentially feminist ways--I just want to show her how feminism can look in theory and applied. Any suggestions?


These are all some staples in the feminist canon that are pretty easy reading (first 2 are older, second 2 are newer):
The Feminine Mystique
The Beauty Myth
Cunt
Manifesta

A broad overview of different feminisms...kinda like the "genres" of feminism (liberal, Marxist, radical, psychoanalytic, gender, global, ecofeminism, etc):
Feminist Thought (academic, but pretty readable and useful)

Multicultural:
Feminism without Borders (not terribly user-friendly, but freaking genius)

Overview of second-wave movement:
The World Split Open (VERY easy and intriguing read)

Female Chauvinist Pigs is getting mixed reviews (both here in the lounge and elsewhere). I haven't read it yet, but it seems people either love it or hate it.
kittenb
I know this is going to make me sound ridiculous, but as someone who has been known to shove bills into drawers and pretend that they are not there, Confessions of a Shopaholic did not make me laugh so much as it scared me. I don't do that anymore.
curioushair
QUOTE
if you want to write - by ueland, i think i enjoy reading books about writing more than writing sometimes


Seriously. I picked up Dorothea Brande's Becoming a Writer at a used bookstore a few months ago for a mere three bucks. It's old, but still valid.

John Gardner's written some great books on writing that aren't too "chicken soup" (Anne Lamott, et al.).
vesicapisces
Lapis, bell hooks *is* a great place to start, the one I'm thinking of in particular is "Feminism for Everyone" (I believe) - small book, unintimidating, great intro.
mermaidgirl13
Lapis, I second the bell hooks reccommedation and also the ones mentioned a few posts down. Definitely read CUNT and maybe also check out the author's second book Autobiography of a Blue-eyed Devil, although it's more about racism than feminism.

Manifesta is great too.

Female Chauvenist Pigs isn't life-changing but I think it is valuable to read because it looks at what young women are dealing with right now. I'm 24 and connected with it, but I think younger girls would too. While reading it, I kept thinking it would be valuable to any mothers of a teenage girls.
mandolyn
recent reads:

christopher moore - you suck. vintage moore. too much fun.
david maine - the preservationist. excellent & funny.
david maine - fallen. not as much fun, but still interesting.
stephen king - the cell. waste o'time
stephen king - lisey's story. ditto.
dean koontz - life expectancy. fast read, great fun.

now reading:

Then We Came to the End by Joshua Ferris. a cross between the office & office space & catch 22. hee.

and then i must needs read some vonnegut. i'm so sad he's gone. sad.gif
lapis
Thanks for the thorough recommendations, folks! I will look into these. I read Cunt and LOVED it but was unsure if it's be ok for an un-feminist. I read Manifesta and wasn't too keen on it but did like Catching the Wave and Rebecca Walker's edited volume To be Real. Waht happns to the Third Wave interests me a lot. Also, I will look at the hooks' book recommended here. I loved Black Looks and Teaching to Transgress. I will try to find it, but one of these books had an article by a dude throwing a feminist Bachlor party and that was really good. The next question is: any good feminist books you might suggest on motherhood/parenting/pregnancy? I don't want to read everything in sight but want to get oriented in a good way to this upcoming experience. I see motherhood as a really good time to think about your feminist practice and am pretty excited about it, and want to find some good models. Spirituality and motherhood seems to be coming up for me too--any thoughts? Also, is this an ok way to post here? I don't want to ask questions that aren't beneficial to others and it seems like a lot of the posts are not so targeted, just sharing what's been read lately. Thanks!
bunnyb
lapis, it's definitely okay to post those queries in here; I agree with the bell hooks and Cunt. As for motherhood, I'm unable to help; I could, however, provide stellar examples of anti-motherhood literary representations.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Half of a Yellow Sun was very good and now enjoying Good Omens (Pratchett and Gaiman).

RIP Kurt Vonnegut.
cinegirl
QUOTE(lapis @ Apr 17 2007, 08:46 PM) *
The next question is: any good feminist books you might suggest on motherhood/parenting/pregnancy? I don't want to read everything in sight but want to get oriented in a good way to this upcoming experience. I see motherhood as a really good time to think about your feminist practice and am pretty excited about it, and want to find some good models. Spirituality and motherhood seems to be coming up for me too--any thoughts? Also, is this an ok way to post here? I don't want to ask questions that aren't beneficial to others and it seems like a lot of the posts are not so targeted, just sharing what's been read lately. Thanks!


I really like Sheila Kitzinger's Complete Guide to Pregnancy and Childbirth, and The Thinking Woman's Guide to a Better Birth by Henci Goer. I've heard great things about Ina May Gaskin's Spiritual Midwifery but haven't read it.

On a related topic, I am a huge proponent of Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wechsler--whether you are trying to conceive or trying not to conceive or not trying anything at all, I feel like every woman should read this book to understand what our bodies are doing, because it's truly miraculous, every single month.

On What Was Lost is a good book about understanding miscarriage (I think I read about it in Bitch) from a variety of first-person accounts.
great
My favorite book is: Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory By Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare. Keller, Lisa H. Schwartzman.This book breaks new ground in four key areas of feminist social thought: the sex/gender debates; challenges to liberalism/equality; feminist ethics; and feminist perspectives on global ethics and politics in the 21st century. Altogether, the essays provide an innovative look at feminist philosophy while making substantive contributions to current debates in gender theory, ethics, and political thought.
euphorically
I am nearly finished Kavalier and Clay. I wondered what people thought of it and how it compares to some of those other epic-ish American books by young men out there. I personally prefer Middlesex. What did the rest of you think?
maelstrom
I just finished Slammerkin, a dark, moving read. I highly recomend it. I normally pass books along, when I'm finished with them, however this one I'm going to hold on to.
MaybeSparrow
Now that school is almost over for the semester, I am planning my summer reading. So far I know I want to read:

--Lolita
--Ulysses
--I know why the caged bird sings

What should I add?
gogosgirl
hey maelstrom,

if you like 'em dark, may I recommend:
~the dress lodger
~geek love
~fingersmith or affinity

me, I just finished black swan green. david mitchell has a way with the old words, he does...
bunnyb
Fingersmith, Geek Love and Lolita are all amazing.

Just finished Banana Yoshimoto's Kitchen and Clare Allan's Polly Shakespeare and about to begin Margaret Atwood's The Blind Assassin.
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