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olivarria
Thanks for the tip Starpiste. I bought some huge portobello mushrooms and try to make crab-stuffed mushrooms out of them, but it turned out terrible! I added way to much garlic and seasoning. Seriously i had no idea my cooking could taste so awful! I've been eating at the cafeteria lately because I don't feel like cooking. They have superior omelettes - very nice! My nausea seems to have stopped now - so my appetite is back! Yay.
p_176
speaking of trainers....i met with one who is going to do only weight training, no cardio. should i sign on to train with this guy? it feels off somehow....but i have money to spend in my flexible spending, and training is reimbursable.
_octinoxate
hey star, i have some info to share with you later (off to work now), but wanted to say a quicker note to p176: i think cardio is more straightforward (eg, use the elliptical, go for a run, dance, etc.) so it's not as cost effective to have someone "train" you how to do it. with weights, however, there really are important guidelines and assistance you need to have--esp at first--to avoid injury. i would totally sign on with that trainer, and do the cardio on your own (maybe with a wee bit of advice from the trainer, such as where to work it into your routine.) did that make sense?
p_176
edit....i'm probably going to cancel the trainer.....i can find another way to spend my flex spending account before the end of the year....
freckleface7
does anyone here have any expereince w/ shin splints? ( am thinking maybe erin posted about it before?)

frecklette started complaining of discomfort in her ankels when she would run in pe class daily and I took her to the dr and that's what he said is wrong, and did a mess of x-rays as well to rule out stress fractures too.

she's now on no running/high impact activity restriction for a month & I have to get her fitted for an orthotic & mobility control running shoes bc she has flat feet.

anyone that can tell or share anything w/ me about it would be much appreciated ~
chachaheels
I've seen this often in a lot of the kids I see who are dancers--lots of bone pains in the shin, especially.

If you have a good health food store that carries Biochemical Tissue Salts, the thing that works best for these patients is Calc. Phos. 6X or 12X tissue salts. It can be used on a daily basis (because those bone pains are the body trying to tell you it needs this mineral) and it can also be used whenever the bone pains are active (very often with these patients, the bone pains came after their activity, usually at night when they try to sleep and rest).

To dose daily, take 4 of the little pills under the tongue two times a day (on waking and before bed). If she's suffering from the pain, take a 4 pill dose under the tongue and repeat the dose every 15 minutes until the pain stops (it won't be long). This is a vital mineral for building bone strength--I always imagine that in these growing children the pains come on because they are so active and this encourages their bone growth--but that can drain the body's stores of this mineral on a level that food simply cannot replace (and, by the way, all the Biochemical tissue salts are absolutely vital for good health, but they are actually "inorganic" in that they cannot be replaced by supplementation or food sources--they're missing in the body on a very deep level and that's what's causing the symptoms).

I think she'll be feeling much better and fully capable again in no time. If she really does have flat feet, then a supportive shoe or orthotic might be a good idea to help her grow.
candycane_girl
Hello, ladies! I've been looking for a good weight loss book and I'm thinking that I will pick up a copy of Eat Fat Lose Fat. I looked around the book's website and I just have one question. Where exactly can I buy coconut oil? Would that be at a grocery store or at a nutrition store?
tankgirl
QUOTE(candycane_girl @ Sep 28 2008, 07:07 AM) *
Hello, ladies! I've been looking for a good weight loss book and I'm thinking that I will pick up a copy of Eat Fat Lose Fat. I looked around the book's website and I just have one question. Where exactly can I buy coconut oil? Would that be at a grocery store or at a nutrition store?


you can get coconut oil at any store that would sell health foods. Some regular grocery stores carry it, but I'm not sure about around where you live.
PixiePink
Hey ladies, all of you posted a very informative subject here.. I was reading olivaria post, I never knew that American yogurt has that much sugar. I usually had yogurt as my lunch substitute, it wasn't great ideas i guess! I used to confused choosing fast and less cal meals for my lunch..
culturehandy
What really irks me how much sugar is in everything. Sugar, corn syrup, glucose, all this unnatural crap.

I was reading the ingredients on something and it had sugar, and dried corn syrup oil in the frst five ingredients. I was shocked and horrified. I remember what it was! It was hot chocolate from tim hortons.
candycane_girl
I'm slowly trying to get away from foods that are just really unnatural but I feel like it's so hard. Like, you have to shop at a special organic grocery store because the regular one just won't have natural foods.

Another thing about yogurt, I picked up Eat Fat Lose Fat and it was talking about eating whole yogurt. Where the heck can I find that? I have some yogurt in my fridge and it's just some random stuff that my dad got for me. It just has the name of the dairy farm it came from and doesn't say if it's whole or anything.
chachaheels
Some good full fat yogurt brands you can find include Liberty, Hewitts, Western, StoneyBrook? (I think that's their name). If you're in Toronto, CCGirl, there are a number of organic markets which feature farmers who sell good yogurt and cheese. PM me if you like, I'll ask around for you.

You can usually find it in a plain flavour, use it like sour cream or add your own nuts and grains and fruit to it so you can control the sugar yourself.
erinjane
The weather is cooling off so I'm mostly off my bike now and back in the gym. I feel pretty good about it. The last week people have been making comments that I look smaller. That's good because my tummy was looking a little too soft. I like it soft but not that soft. tongue.gif

On a side note, I lost over 5 pounds in the month that my folks were away. There was never any junk food in the house because I refused to buy any. As soon as my mom got back it seems like we've been restocked on chips and chocolate and I find it so hard to say no when they're in the house. I've been doing pretty good though, considering it was my birthday yesterday.
PixiePink
QUOTE(erinjane @ Oct 2 2008, 01:55 PM) *
The weather is cooling off so I'm mostly off my bike now and back in the gym. I feel pretty good about it. The last week people have been making comments that I look smaller. That's good because my tummy was looking a little too soft. I like it soft but not that soft. tongue.gif

On a side note, I lost over 5 pounds in the month that my folks were away. There was never any junk food in the house because I refused to buy any. As soon as my mom got back it seems like we've been restocked on chips and chocolate and I find it so hard to say no when they're in the house. I've been doing pretty good though, considering it was my birthday yesterday.


That is interesting.. mostly parents would keep their kids away from junk food..smile.gif lol
erinjane
Well at 23 I think my mom figures I'll make my own choices. I know she's snacking more right now because she's been having a miserable time being peri-menopausal but man it's annoying. tongue.gif
anna k
Sometimes I feel bad that I'm not as fit or as slim as Hollywood actresses who are described as being tiny in real life, but I felt better after reading this quote by Julianne Moore:

I hate dieting. I hate having to do it to be the 'right' size. I'm hungry all the time...I think I'm a slender person, but the industry apparently doesn't. All actresses are hungry all the time, I think.

It frustrates me that despite following a diet that limits or restricts wheat, gluten, and dairy (so I don't bloat), eating fruits and vegetables, working out 2-3 nights a week (maybe 4 or 5 if my work hours don't cut into the gym class time), drinking water and green tea, I am still a curvy size 10, and will always have soft pale features instead of looking fitter and smaller. Even if I get told by people that I've lost a lot of weight, I can still feel the same inside. Or my belly bloats more when I am going through PMS, and makes me feel pregnant. I read the Jezebel post, which is from January, but I looked it up tonight for some reassurance, and felt better after reading some things people had written about looking beyond the flawless images.

I need to pick up some New Chapter vitamins and digestive enzymes, they help my stomach and give me more nutrients.
p_176
anyone know anything about metabolic syndrome a.k.a. insulin resistance syndrome?
Lunalu
QUOTE(p_176 @ Nov 4 2008, 10:07 AM) *
anyone know anything about metabolic syndrome a.k.a. insulin resistance syndrome?


p_176:

You should check these pages, it provides good source of info. I also suffer from polycystic ovarion syndrome thus metabolic syndrome.

http://www.womentowomen.com/insulinresistance/default.aspx

http://www.womentowomen.com/insulinresista...foodgroups.aspx
p_176
are there non-pill ways to deal with it? i know that losing weight is one way, but if the health issue makes it hard to lose weight....then how to resolve it?
Lunalu
QUOTE(p_176 @ Nov 6 2008, 03:46 PM) *
are there non-pill ways to deal with it? i know that losing weight is one way, but if the health issue makes it hard to lose weight....then how to resolve it?


well, looks like the pill (the kind diabetics use) is the fastest relief bringing option. but in the long run, it all depends on what you eat, because no matter what you take medically, as soon as it's stopped, the problem will come back. I understand that it's more difficult to cope with than one would expect, i wish i had more things to suggest. i hope you'll find a good solution and i would like to hear that too if it works. and even if it doesnt work.
chachaheels
Actually, losing weight will not fix the problem of insulin resistance. Weight gain can result from insulin resistance, but it's not necessarily an outcome of the "syndrome" (meaning it's not a disease, it's just a set of commonly observed symptoms in a variety of patients signaling some kind of dysfunction).

It can be completely reversed by making changes to your diet that should be permanent changes for all of us anyway.
There are many really good diets out there that treat this problem effectively--from Atkin's diet (which Atkins developed and wrote about in the 70's, when he first made the connection to sugar/carbohydrate intake and insulin resistance...it's very effective in reversing this) to the Protein Power Life Plan diet by the Drs. Eades; to the Eat Fat Lose Fat diet developed by Dr. Mary Enig. This last diet is especially effective, particularly for women. The last book in particular is far more aware of food additives, various sugars and chemicals that have been developed as a means of enhancing flavour in poor quality foods which really harm us in terms of insulin resistance; and it stresses a real need for us to source the best quality foods.

Weight loss is very likely to result, since eating sugar is the way to gain weight regardless, and most of us don't even realize how much sugar is making its way into our diets via foods we're told are harmless or even good for us. If you've gained weight because of hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance, then the diet change will fix the problem of insulin resistance first. In doing that, the stored fat will be lost.

No need to take any of the pills out there, which I've seen to be quite ineffective in all kinds of patients (they ironically seem to work best only for those who have modified their diets to cut out the offending foods anyway).
Lunalu
QUOTE(chachaheels @ Nov 8 2008, 08:20 AM) *
Actually, losing weight will not fix the problem of insulin resistance. Weight gain can result from insulin resistance, but it's not necessarily an outcome of the "syndrome" (meaning it's not a disease, it's just a set of commonly observed symptoms in a variety of patients signaling some kind of dysfunction).

It can be completely reversed by making changes to your diet that should be permanent changes for all of us anyway.
There are many really good diets out there that treat this problem effectively--from Atkin's diet (which Atkins developed and wrote about in the 70's, when he first made the connection to sugar/carbohydrate intake and insulin resistance...it's very effective in reversing this) to the Protein Power Life Plan diet by the Drs. Eades; to the Eat Fat Lose Fat diet developed by Dr. Mary Enig. This last diet is especially effective, particularly for women. The last book in particular is far more aware of food additives, various sugars and chemicals that have been developed as a means of enhancing flavour in poor quality foods which really harm us in terms of insulin resistance; and it stresses a real need for us to source the best quality foods.

Weight loss is very likely to result, since eating sugar is the way to gain weight regardless, and most of us don't even realize how much sugar is making its way into our diets via foods we're told are harmless or even good for us. If you've gained weight because of hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance, then the diet change will fix the problem of insulin resistance first. In doing that, the stored fat will be lost.

No need to take any of the pills out there, which I've seen to be quite ineffective in all kinds of patients (they ironically seem to work best only for those who have modified their diets to cut out the offending foods anyway).



chachaheels:

What I meant by pills,just to make it clear, was not any kind of weight loss aids / pills or whatever that are out there. Since I also have this problem together with Polycystic ovarian syndrome, even though I'm not II Diabetic, my doctor suggested I take metformin pills if I want to improve as quick as possible to bump up the insulin rate in my body and burn fatinstead of keep storing it, since this has been affecting my periods pretty badly. Well, my answer was NO, as I wanted to try the conservative and the most effective wayin the lond run,and that is as you mention is Diet based on low-glycemic index, and also exercise.
so what comes down to it, as you said, is a permanent change in diet.
chachaheels
I meant the pills such as metforamin. That one in particular only seems to be effective if people modify their diets to significantly reduce sugar/carbohydrate intake. I wonder why the dietary change and an adoption of a food intake that eliminates all processed junk, agri-business "meats" and all the names made legal for trans fats and MSG (which reverses all of these conditions just fine by itself) is always "prescribed" with a pharmaceutical drug that's supposed to do this for you anyway?

For the PCOS, the most effective diet would be the Eat Fat Lose Fat diet--next time you're in a bookstore or the library, check it out.
p_176
to undo my initial question about non pill ways to deal with it, i wrote that when i was paranoid my dr would automatically put me on the Pill, as the solution.
so, if the 'cure' is to lose weight, and PCOS makes it hard to lose weight......i'm not sure i get how that actually works.
i've been looking at various sites online, and no one knows what causes it? come on.
chachaheels
Okay, I know (many unskilled and unscrupulous) doctors will put people on the birth control pill for just about anything these days, but I've yet to hear of it being used as a viable conventional treatment for either PCOS or insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia. It may be done, but it isn't a very good idea, just in terms of the changes you would try to effect in the body. It seems like it would be used as a very crude and non-specific means of changing the hormonal balance in the body, possibly to stop the production of testosterone (a negative side effect for women, it's the reason why women lose their sex drives completely when they're on the pill).

Also: weight loss is neither a treatment nor cure for hyperinsulinemia. Nor is excess weight its cause. In some cases, excess weight can be a symptom of hyperinsulinemia/insulin resistance, but it doesn't indicate insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia. One is just as likely to have this "syndrome" at "normal" weight as they are "overweight". PCOS can be a problem for women of all shapes and sizes, not everyone has all the symptoms in the "syndrome".

Likewise, simply telling a patient to "lose weight" as a treatment for PCOS won't change anything about the PCOS. The symptoms will endure and possibly exacerbate, as they tend to do when they're just suppressed (and forcing a loss of weight, in this situation, is really just symptom suppression). Just to illustrate this, many women who were at one time anorexic and lost body fat (to the extent that their periods changed because they didn't have enough body fat to enable menstruation) often find themselves suffering from PCOS-like symptoms even after their bodies recover to a healthy state, fat-wise. They become hirsute because of the weight loss, and often develop ovarian cysts as a result of the weight loss as well (which leads to the hirsutism, and then to the infertility, etc etc etc).
p_176
so what came first, the chicken or the egg? PCOS or prediabetes? weight gain caused it or not?
chachaheels
Well, as I said, weight LOSS can cause it, if there's a susceptibility to PCOS in that particular patient .

Again, weight gain may be a symptom of PCOS. I've never, ever known it to be a cause of PCOS, never in my experience of learning about and studying the condition, or meeting with and working with women who have this condition. As far as diabetes: same thing. You can be reed thin all your life and still acquire type II diabetes. And yes, it can happen just as commonly in thin people as it can in the "overweight". It can and does happen particularly because the tendency to diabetes is largely hereditary.

If you would like to figure out a cause of PCOS, you'll have to know that the only cause medicine has ever found for a disease of any nature is susceptibility.

What "causes" the formation of cysts in the body, anywhere, is the need for cyst formation. Cysts are made by the body as a means of containing a particular growth of cells/death of cells in tissue, so that the activity is not spread throughout the body. Whatever is changing the tissue in any particular area of the body could be a number of things--if you're talking about PCOS, the cause is usually hormonal imbalance. Anything that can create that will create a situation which could make you susceptible to PCOS.

There is no chicken or egg situation here--cyst formation is part of what the body does to heal itself. Healthy bodies create cysts which contain the progress of whatever stimulates the body to protect itself with cysts. Bodies which aren't that healthy will continue to have to create cysts, because the process which makes them necessary does not remain contained.

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is not about being fat so much as it is about the function of the tissue in the ovary becoming interrupted by the creation of and proliferation of cysts, which can result from any number of ways that hormones can become imbalanced (if you've got a thyroid condition or you notice that others in your family do; if you've had a massive weight loss; if you've been put on the birth control pill for any length of time; if you're using corticosteroids for asthma "treatment", treatment of skin diseases, or pain relief, even if you've only used them once; if others in your family have had PCOS;...it's limitless. Furthermore, once this process becomes routine and cysts continue to be made in response, the cysts themselves will influence the function of the ovary, altering its ability to release/absorb hormones and produce healthy ova. That's why, if you have it and lose weight, you'll still have it.
p_176
meh. it's actually official - have it. supposedly it's not "as bad" as it could be - ie, my hormone levels could be more imbalanced than they actually are - but i'm not taking Metformin to deal with the prediabetes, as well as the Alli diet pill
i still find it outrageously ironic that to make a particular disease better, you have to lose weight, and that very disease makes it hard to lose weight.
chacha, can you please indulge me and discuss a little more about the ways you listed that can cause hormones to become imbalanced?
thanks all for listening to me whine (hugs)
erinjane
Hellllllo! How is everyone doing on their 'becoming healthy' journey? I've been having a good last few weeks. For about 5 weeks I've gone to the gym at least once a week, but finally this week I worked out four days. I'm starting to see some great improvement in my running again. Today I ran for 10 minutes straight, took a 3 minute walking break, ran for 5 minutes, took a 2 minute break, and did another 5 minutes. I feel great now.

I'm still snacking on junk food a little too much but that's definitely improving. Trying out some new recipes and definitely missing farmers market season now.
hiddenpoet
"the journey to become healthy" i like that!
for me things have gone to an irritating standstill. i go running at the gym every other day for thirty or forty minutes but i can't even attempt to reach my best time & length due to horrific allergies. i always run three fourths and then cool down for one fourth of the mile.
i no longer resent eating salads and am starting to enjoy it a bit. i got this really cool idea from Grant Achatz' cookbook and made beet raviolis - instead of pasta you just use slices of roasted beets. so i've been playing around with slices of other veggies and fillings with tasty results.
things will get better when the weather cools down more for me. i don't know when i'll ever get back to "me" or if that can even happen but i'll try and keep trying.
chachaheels
Well, I find it ironic that someone would tell anyone with PCOS to lose weight "as a cure". I'd love even a pseudo scientific explanation as to how it could in any way help anyone with PCOS, and maybe just one example of any person who did lose weight while afflicted with PCOS, and after that, I'd love to know if that person actually became cured of the PCOS as a result.

But I can see the motivation: Metforamin and Alli ain't cheap, and they keep the doctors in the pharmaceutical reps' reward books.

Anytime you go on a diet you starve your body. Do it long enough, and not just one gland will shut down but your entire metabolism will slow to a standstill because your body is being forced to react to the starvation. For people who are slim, and gain a few pounds from inactivity or a change in habits, cutting down calories can help them lose those few pounds and restore them to the lighter end of their scale of "normal". They aren't really in any danger of gaining weight from overeating. Many of them can overeat and gain nothing, it's their metabolism and that's determined mainly genetically, just as your height is (and it's about as easy to change as your height--however, even women like this can be afflicted with things like hypothyroidism, graves/hashimoto's disease, cushing syndrome, etc--permanent changes to gland function which result in hormone imbalance and then in weight gain. It's not uncommon for women to suffer something akin to this even after pregnancies, or from the use of any kind of hormonal treatment on a long term basis--birth control pill, asthma, sports injury).

For people with a significant percentage of body fat to lose, though, the starvation diet ALWAYS, without exception, fails. Time and again scientists observe that initially weight comes off while the body is starved, but eventually physiological cravings resulting from the starvation take over. One of the first and most prominent: sugar cravings which cannot be satiated. Why? The thyroid gland is dysfunctional and it makes the body crave sugar in order to fuel its attempts at full function. By then, however, it's too late: that dysfunction has created a deficiency in thyroid hormones--which affects so many other glands in the body. Like a cascade when one gland misfires or cannot function, every interaction created by the hormones which are now no longer released by a healthy gland will be altered. Every other gland will ultimately change the amount of hormone produced and released into the system in an effort to compensate for the initial imbalance or simply respond to the imbalance in kind. One of the reasons you begin to increase in storing fat is because hormones like estrogen go into limited supply--so your body tries desperately to store the estrogen in fat stores it will create, in order to ensure you'll have some. The scarcity of that particular sex hormone is usually matched by an overabundance of other sex hormones--so you'll see secondary sex characteristics previously suppressed by the predominance of estrogen suddenly become expressed (like the hirsuteness associated with PCOS). Another example of the cascade: when your body craves sugar and sugary foods, your pancreas must constantly produce insulin to contend with the rush of sugar in the blood from those cravings. The sugar is quickly metabolized by the insulin, which remains in the bloodstream longer because it's been released in larger and larger quantities. Blood sugar levels roller coaster, the body responds with having to eat more sugar and then create more insulin, and finally, you will develop a resistance to insulin, and a constant high blood sugar--that's your insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia. It's yet another symptom and yet another gland that can be harmed because of the process the weight loss can set into motion.

There's a reason your body will fight you if you try to starve it, and particularly if you try to starve out the fat and estrogen stores which are a symptom of the PCOS. It's trying to solve a problem created by the illness: removing its attempts to heal itself will only make the disease far more virulent, and your symptoms far more pronounced (or worse, more hidden and more deadly).
p_176
chacha - why do you focus on 'diet' as equal to starvation? i do understand that denying your body what it needs will lead to hormone issues. but, eating the proper amount of calories for one's activity level is a diet, as opposed to overeating, but it's not starvation diet.
but speaking of that, what do you think of the show The Biggest Loser - where, people who are at least 100lbs overweight and accustomed to eating much more than 2,000 calories per day, are put on a diet of 1400 (women) and 1800 (men) per day?
re: losing weight as a 'cure' for PCOS, where did you get that idea? i never said that - i just said that losing weight would (in theory) make the PCOS better. the way i understand it, metformin helps your body process sugar better, so you don't have high blood sugar, which in turn may help [you] lose weight, which helps the hormones go back in balance. no one has ever said the PCOS will go away.
i've had asthma since i was 3, and i've never heard of hormonal treatments for asthma, or treatments that affects hormones.
chachaheels
The main treatments for asthma are still corticosteroids, via inhalers. There have been a few non-steroidal asthma meds introduced in the past 10 years, but they are all still mostly used in conjunction with the steroid inhalers.

Those are hormones. In very large doses. Taken repeatedly. By some patients, on a daily basis, if not on a daily, "as-needed" basis.

That will have a major impact on hormonal balance.

The Biggest Losers are all being put on starvation diets. 1400 calories a day for a grown woman will give her enough food to breathe and sleep and function without expending too much effort, and that's a woman who is petite and slim naturally, someone quite petite (like, 5 foot 1 or so) and weighing about 100 pounds.. A woman who is bigger than that will need more than that to stay healthy, let alone be active enough to just live properly. Sure, these diets will "work" in the sense that for the first little while of the starvation weight will come off. Then, when it "plateaus" or when the body actually reacts to the starvation by slowing the metabolism down as though it were dying (which, in fact, it actually is), weight gain will actually follow. No matter how little is eaten. In fact, eating less in such a situation just makes the body more determined to pack fat back on. Even Weight Watchers is aware that if you don't eat enough to support the body at its current weight, weight loss is impossible.

As for "weight loss helps PCOS" I think I detailed how it would do the exact opposite, simply temporarily mask the PCOS and force the pathological process of the disease to target even more vulnerable, deep organs. It's pretty obvious the PCOS is a cause of the change in fat storage in the body, since the weight gain and body shape change is determined by the change in hormone balance. Losing weight as a "treatment" is pointless, you're actually just trying to undo what the body is doing to keep itself functioning.

Sorry if you don't want to hear it, but that's my opinion and observation on the matter. What you choose to do is up to you, of course.
p_176
pcos again - i had it lumped together - the diabetes medicine reduces the effects of pcos by making the body more sensitive to glucose and reduces testosterone levels. weight loss may be a result then, which is never a bad thing....the majority of people need to lose weight!

how else would you get hormones in balance?

asthma corticosteroids....i guess my asthma is not that bad then, i've not had to use steroids, except on the occasion i'm really sick and can't breathe. i can't remember the last time i was that sick.......

chachaheels
Well, actually, the diabetes medication does not make the body more sensitive to glucose--people with diabetes are already sensitive to glucose, so sensitive that they can't produce stable amounts of insulin. They have to produce extreme amounts continuously, so often that their bodies eventually no longer respond to insulin. That overproduction is what kicks the body out of balance....in diabetes. In PCOS, a similar situation could be a factor in the underproduction of various hormones and overproduction of various other hormones (it will be different in every case).

There are lots of ways to restore hormone balance. You could find out about the many I've mentioned, and check out the conventional options as well, and when you're thoroughly informed on each, you can make a decision.
p_176
ooops! i meant to write insulin where i put glucose in my last post
when i google restore hormone balance, i get mostly things on menopause.
princess_dander
I'm so frusrated right now. For the past three weeks I have been working out like crazy. Swimming at least a mile at a time and/or running two miles. My body is a little more toned, but I will lose a pound and then gain two. It seems the only way i can keep my body in a caloric deficit is when I don't eat past five and feel dizzy and I have gotten to a point in my life where this is not something I am enjoying. I am trying to learn how to take care and nuture without the aid of food so that I can lose the weight I want to. This is annoying as fuck.

p_176- asthma corticosteroids suck for me. I got some chubb on from prednisone(sp?) That stuff gives you the munchies without the nice buzz. I only was put on it when I was super sick and my asthma is pretty much under control as well.
culturehandy
Princess_Dander, as you work out more, you are loosing body fat, but gaining muscle. You may loose a pound, but you are also gaining muscle mass, which weighs more. The number on the scale isn't actually representative of what's going on with your body.
chachaheels
Princess Dander, I think a large part of your weight "gain" is from putting on muscle mass, too.

I always advise people to take measurements on a weekly or monthly basis. Take measurements of your head, your neck, your shoulders, chest, waist, hips, around your thigh, knee, widest part of your calf, your ankles, the widest part of your upper arm, your wrist, and record your shoe size. All of these measurements will change as you work out and lose weight, whereas the number on the scale may stay the same or even increase.

You can add up all the inches that you lose, too--it's always an encouraging number and it gives you a much more realistic idea of exactly how your body is changing because you can see first hand how weight loss takes place all over the body.

But, I'm concerned that you are experiencing dizziness. That, combined with the fact that you're really not losing weight at all despite your activity tells me you're not eating enough for your body to actually increase its metabolic rate. Yes, you need to eat more. If you don't, you'll be doing a lot of exercise until your body forces you to stop--right now that dizziness you're feeling is your body telling you you need to eat, it needs energy. If you're actually starving yourself, you'll slow your metabolism down completely.

More protein and fat, and choose carbohydrates that your body can use slowly. Leafy greens--lots of them. High protein grains, if you have to have them--things like quinoa and amaranth as opposed to inferior quality wheat grains that have been super processed and stripped of nutrients completely, especially if they've been "enriched".

Consider eating real protein foods--cheese, meats (especially the nutrient rich organ meats), fish, fowl, eggs, nuts and seeds, tofu. Protein isolate foods like all those protein powders on the market right now are all super processed, many contain nothing but genetically modified soy (which hinders thyroid function) and a bunch of neurotoxin "sweeteners" like aspartame (which really does a number on your insulin production and need). They're pricey and they're junk.

I also encourage you to add some Vitamin C and chromium picolinate to your list of supplements, or take a bit more than you already take if you're already taking some. You should have about 1500 mgs/day of vitamin C if you're experiencing hypoglycemic symptoms like the one you describe. It will really make a difference.
culturehandy
Speaking of protein, I stopped taking a protein supplement, loaded up on protein rich foods and started taking cod liver oil (which is disgusting) and I've noticed more changes to my body since. Not that i didn't before, but things are coming along much more.

Princess dander, I mean to include my situation. I work out, a lot. I have noticed no changes in the scale, but my pant size changes, usually every 6 weeks. Don't let the number discourage you.
lapis
p.176
I have PCOS and a toddler so I won't write too much. Have you tried inositol? My friends and I used it for our PCOS and we all got pregnant--I think that means it put our hormones in balance. I made lots of things with buckwheat and nibbled on carob and took choline inositol capsules. Research backs it up--it's cheap, so I think that's why it's not marketed so much. That, a healthy diet, and not using bc pills seemed to do the trick. My theory is that the pill causes PCOS...
geekchickknits
(cross post with depression thread)

sweet jebus.

I went to a hot yoga class yesterday. first one I've gone to (I've done yoga before, but not hot yoga) and I definitely want to go back. It was very gentle, but INTENSE. However, I wouldn't recommend it to people who haven't done yoga before.

I've been eating a lot better over this past week, trying to create balanced meals, and concerning myself with good food rather than calorie count. Even though I recently reached my "scary" weight (the number at which I go, OK! No higher than that!) it's the fact that my depression has resurfaced that has brought about my diet change. I can't think that a steady diet of fast food and take-out while skipping lunch is good for my mental health!

Anyway, do people have suggestions for foods (aside from chocolate) and supplements that help with depression and serotonin levels?
chachaheels
Supplements:

Depression is always a sign of fat deficiency.
You could add a daily dose of omega 3 fatty acids (Flax seed oil, Tuna oil, Cod Liver Oil, Fish oil--the fish oils are the most effective but you can opt for the flax seed if you're a vegetarian); and a dose of specific omega 6 fatty acids (Oil of Evening Primrose).

All oils should be premium quality, expeller pressed, cold first pressing extraction. If you opt for fish oils, make sure they're purified and extracted without chemical means. Cod liver oil is very possibly the best oil you can take because it is loaded with vitamins A and D, in natural forms. The synthetic forms of these vitamins are actually toxins, so you must avoid them. Deficiencies in either of those two vitamins are often responsible for depression.

Lots of antioxidant vitamins are good, too: vitamins A, C, E, and Selenium.
Switch out your salt--use raw sea salt instead, in its crude form (it's usually moist, and grey). Celtic or Britanny sea salt is loaded with trace minerals we really need but never get from synthesized Sodium Chloride, or table salt. Spend the extra money, it's worth it and your food will taste so much better. You also don't need to use as much.

Never mind about serotonin levels, it's just one minuscule part of the whole puzzle that has to work well in order for you to handle challenges and be resilient. If you're working out you're producing endorphins anyway. Depression is far more complicated than just the "chemical balance in your brain", so try not to see it in those limited and flawed terms alone.

Suggestions for products: if you're in the US or Canada:

Carlson Cod Liver oil capsules or oil, they come in plain or lemon flavour--some of the best and purest cod liver oil with the highest vitamin D content
Efalex fish oil/evening primrose oil balanced 3 and 6 omega fatty acid capsules
Biostrath Elixir/tincture/pills for a very good, affordable, total vitamin/coenzyme/amino acid/live culture in a fermented herbal base daily supplement.

Also: at least half an hour of daily sunlight exposure--if you can take a daily walk in sunlight and even soak up some sun, this is the best way to create and store vitamin D in the body. That lack of natural vitamin D stores (and the proliferation of synthetic vitamin D used to "enrich" shitty food) is one huge reason why depression is so widespread.

Eat real food. Real raw milk dairy if you can get it (including butter, cheese, and yogurt, full fat is preferable); real meats and fish and eggs (find a good butcher who buys good quality meat and can sell you cuts that arent astronomically expensive, and learn how to use the bones to make broth--also, find a good fishmonger and eat fish like sardines, mackerel, char, etc); real vegetables, preferably those grown biodynamically or organically or hydroponically without the use of chemical fertilizers and "cides" of all kinds.

Fast food is filled with all kinds of "fake" food like msg as substitutes for real food ingredients (which cost more). Not only does that stuff actually force your body into becoming fat, what you lose from not having the real nutrients these chemicals are supposed to replace is too valuable to your body for you to do without it. Avoid it at all costs, it definitely contributes to your depression.

sassygrrl
chacha, I've said it before and I'll say it again, you're the best!! This has been happening to me as well. Thank you.
chachaheels
Ah, Thanks, sassygrrl. Hope this helps.

I forgot one other thing:

B vitamins! B12, best in liquid methylcobalamin form (you can take drops of it daily) or in a sublingual form (little pills you put under the tongue and allow to dissolve. Look for this form of the vitamin as it's most easily absorbed, and try to get at least 1000 mcg/day.

All the other B's are needed, too: inositol, folic acid, etc. A lot of B vitamins are just poor quality (the give away is that when you take them, your pee turns bright yellow green). I definitely like the BioStrath liquids for the B vitamin mix because it's in a fermented herb base (so a little goes a long, long, way) and there is an alternative that is available all over the world, in a line called "New Chapter". They make a B supplement called B Food. Good stuff. The fermented soy base (they use fermented soy, Bio Strath is more of a fermented mixed herb--similar thinking, based on biodynamism) really does make a huge difference in whether or not your body actually gets the nutrients at all.

Oh, and if you're sourcing good veggie foods, meats, and dairy, it really does pay to find local producers instead of buying stuff just labelled "organic" that comes from China (where there are no organic farms).


rubberdollz
Does anybody have any info on agave nectar? Being... is it good or bad for you? I always thought it was part of the good sugars to have, instead of like Splenda or aspartame. I just read an article stating that agave is really bad for you and is linked right up there with high fructose corn syrup! I'm totally shocked by this considering I just got my dad off Splenda and now he eats either agave or Stevia.

Also chacha I was wondering about the cod liver oil. I've been reading in the Weston A. Price book about taking it but it says to eat with a fat, like butter because the butter helps the oil to be absorbed properly into the body, right?

Totally crazy the stuff you learn from that book!!!! I'm thinking about getting it for my parents, my dad is actually considering going in for gastric bypass surgery and I'm really scared for him.
dani1983
Hey busties!
So I haven't done a search to see if someone has talked about this diet before because I'm on my iPhone and I suck at tapping at little links so I'm just going to ask directly: Master Cleanse diet. What do u guys think about it? It's also a great detox diet for what I've heard. I was thinking about starting it on Thursday (beginning of this long thanksgiving weekend) but today was my first day on hydroxycut max( for women) and I hope to see result before starting the master cleanse.
likeanyother
rubberdollz - sorry I don't know the lowdown on agave nectar, but I'm curious as to where you heard that it's so bad for you. I've been reading the Raw Food Detox Diet, which is sort of a fad diet, but has a good foundation -- eating lots of raw fruits and veggies and whole grains and dairy -- and also encourages the use of agave nectar as a sweetener. I've also been using granulated cane juice, which is supposed to be much better than sugar and other artifical sweeteners.
rubberdollz
likeanyother.... here is a link to the article I read: http://www.naturalnews.com/024892.html

This comes from a website I get newsletters from and I've always trusted a lot of their articles. You can even search agave nectar on that website and it brings up articles. I'm really freaked out about it because if I just turned my dad onto this horrible sweetner then I'm really going to feel bad.
chachaheels
The real truth about what many things sold to us as "health foods" is that there is nothing healthy about them.

Agave is a refined fructose, and I don't believe it's a great sweetener just because I don't know the source of the plant from which it's made and to me, it's about as sugary as plain white sugar. Alternatives which are far better include things like raw honey, especially if you can get it with its own propolis and bee pollen (I don't see this option often--but have had honey from Cuba like this, raw, with the propolis and pollen, which are excellent for you); and maple syrup that's made organically (no formaldehyde used in its production).

Are food manufacturers cynical? You bet they are--they see a market in search of alternatives which aren't as harmful as the status quo, they'll seek to take advantage of it any way possible. Some will market real foods, others, usually the same processed food labs who don't want to lose the share of the market turning away from their products, will create something like agave nectar. It's smart business, but ethically very very wrong.

And health food stores will "buy into" the product because they're the gateway for that market. There is quite a lot of bullshit being sold at health food stores, I assure you--just as many refined and processed garbage foods as you would find in a plain old supermarket but all are marketed as "healthy".

Things on my pet peeve list:

Unfermented, genetically modified still legally "organic" soy, used as a "substitute" food. Soy fake cheese, soy fake milk, soy fake meats, soy fake ice cream, soy fake lecithin, soy fake baby formula, soy protein isolates, TVP (textured vegetable protein).
All crap, every last example of it to be found.
All of it introduced to cynically take advantage of a population which is avoiding agribusiness meats and dairy for justifiably ethical reasons.
-Food preparations that jump on the whole "latest diet craze" bandwagon--like the low carb mixes, Omega Fatty Acid "enriched", questionable source foods (such as OFA chocolate, OFA milk, OFA bread--fuck off all of it! It's terrifyingly bad for you, and inevitably someone will trace back some grave neurological disorder to omega fatty acid enriched foods. The act of chemically processing these fats from questionable sources and "enriching" foods with them, a practice that's never been healthy, will never be exposed as toxic and dangerous--instead, the vital omega fatty acids which we really do need will be dismissed as a dangerous health food fad, and the public will be cautioned against alternative medicine yet again.
-Health "foods" which are really just junk, such as organic broths and soups which contain MSG or "hydrolysed proteins" (invariably GMO soy protein, at that). Read the labels! If you're looking at a "healthy" "organic" food product in a tetra pack, like a vegetable broth or chicken broth, and the label uses the words "spices" in any way, it's got msg. Particularly if it's a "vegetarian" product. Avoid it.

Supplements and Herbs
-most of the stuff on the counter is either encased in magnesium stearate (which is impossible for your body to melt, and it has to melt before any of the so-called nutrients are released for your use)
-most of it is not very good quality at the source (you have to know where your micronutrients come from: if they're formulated in a lab to meet "standardization" requirements--and they do, but they go no further than that--again, this is cynical marketing. You're being sold something that fulfills minimum requirements in name only, but you will not gain any benefit from it whatsoever. Please note that people who do have training in nutrition and the use of supplements for health care DO NOT use medical materials which are massed produced to a minimum standardized requirement. They will always use supplements which they know are produced to a higher standard, which produce results both the practitioner and patient can see as benefits.
-Herbs that are not sourced from a reputable grower/harvester. If it comes in a Walmart brand name, or a Shoppers' Drug Mart brand name, or any big fat pharmaceutical-branch brand name, leave it on the shelf. There is a reason herbalists source their materia medica very carefully--plants have to be grown, harvested, prepared and used in very precise ways. Most of the product on the health food store shelf is bulk purchased, mass produced without a concern for any of the medical knowledge needed to source and create these medications. I think it's incredibly unethical for health food stores to just push the stuff to customers without insisting that customers seek out the care and supervision of herbalists, already. The idea that someone with no training whatsoever in herbs can sell you on the use of potent medicinal materials without supervision and by rote prescription is just horrific for me.
Herbs were never meant to be used in such a dangerous way. When they do harm, then the media feels quite justified in yelling loudly about how dangerous alternative medicine is. And ignorant people believe them.

Alternative medicine products, in general
-my own Pet Peeve is selling almost anything as "Homeopathic", without any knowledge about homeopathy, what it is, how it is practiced, how powerful it is and how dangerous it is to 1) self prescribe; 2) prescribe by rote, and 3) prescribe a drug which has never ever been "proven" by homeopaths. Drugs with no proving are not drugs we ever use on our patients.
I throw all polypharmacy medicines in this category. Homeopathy's based on a very clear scientific method that has to be applied in every single case, no exceptions. Anything that's not part of that medical science and not involved in the application of that exact science is just not homeopathy--people who use the medicines in this way don't know what they're doing and they can't interpret how the drugs effect the patients. The fact about homeopathy is that if it's done improperly, it's very, very dangerous. And rote prescribing, one-size fits all, prescribing whole groups of remedies together (often remedies that antidote each other or are inimical, and cause painful aggravations in the patient when used together) will cause harm. Finally, "homeopathy" is not a synonym for "herbal", "nutritional supplement", or "natural". Homeopathy is a complete medical system, with medical substances produced in very specific chemical methods according to legally binding HPUS standards--they are not the same thing as herbs, or minerals, or food. If your health food store salesperson isn't aware of this, then they don't know enough about the products they are selling you to be considered safe or trustworthy resource people.


Generally, there is an awful lot of selling being done by health food stores which involves just selling product to a consumer, when really what's taking place is that people without full training in medical systems are selling powerful drugs to patients who are looking for symptom relief any way possible, but usually in a misinformed way, in that they don't know they still need someone's unbiased supervision to figure out if the drug they're using is actually effective or destructive. It's dangerous all around--health food stores should actually be run as though they were supporting alternative medical practitioners who are legitimate. They ought to be supplying access to medical substances that patients are instructed to buy by their fully trained and skilled practitioners, kind of like the way a pharmacy would act as a support for your doctor, in giving you access to the drug they prescribe. But they just do not, and they aren't required to. They sell according to what they perceive is the demand. That might be fine in other businesses, but it cannot be fine in medicine.

Bottom line: do your research, don't buy any medicinal substances without being under the supervision and care of a qualified practitioner while you're using the drug, and educate yourself about alternative medicine from bona fide sources, not from people who have a vested interest simply in selling you something that doesn't give you more information, but capitalizes on your desire to be healthy on your own terms.

***Edited to add that Not All Health Food Stores Operate This Way--in fact, a great deal are owned and operated by people with genuine interests and concerns in alternative medicine and health. That's where educating yourself as a consumer can make all the difference--you can use this information to select a health food store which isn't out to sell you product unethically. Find a proprietor you can trust and respect, who respects you as a consumer and a patient.
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