Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: The Writer's Block
The BUST Lounge > Forums > Working Grrls
Pages: 1, 2, 3
saktii
My question is this: How do i go about getting a short story published? Alot of magazines don't seem to want to take unsolicited material, so does this mean I need to get an agent?
Should I just spend the money to self-publish (there are place here in SF that do that, but it seems kind of like a scam)?
This is what I really should be doing with my life, but I don't have any idea how to get my stuff out there.
venetia
If you are thinking about self-publishing then I've heard it's better to absolutely publish it yourself than to get involved with a "vanity press" or scam outfit. Like, it makes you look better to just do it yourself than to get involved with something dodgy.
demoness
Saktii, i hope this helps:

http://www.blogit.com/Blogs/Redir/?189
demoness
Saktii, i hope this helps:

http://www.blogit.com/Blogs/Redir/?189
sukouyant
There's a Canadian show called Imprint that did a little episode on dreaded rejection letters and how some Ontario authors cope here's the broadcast

This one...

a rejection letter from a chinese economics journal:

If we publish your paper it would be impossible for us to publish any work of a lower standard... we are to our regret, compelled to return your divine composition, and to beg you a thousand times to overlook our short sight and timidity.

laugh.gif Gentle? Sarcastic? You be the judge. But I can just imagine the argumentative responses they might have got to their brutally honest rejection letters, to provoke the form letter above.
venetia
Argh, I wish I wasn't on dial-up.
spirit lust
QUOTE(saktii @ May 6 2006, 01:14 PM) *

My question is this: How do i go about getting a short story published? Alot of magazines don't seem to want to take unsolicited material, so does this mean I need to get an agent? <BR>Should I just spend the money to self-publish (there are place here in SF that do that, but it seems kind of like a scam)? <BR>This is what I really should be doing with my life, but I don't have any idea how to get my stuff out there.


Hey saktii, are you still interested?

I write for magazines and newspaper (non-fiction though), and can answer some of these q's.

Getting a short story published - email editors and talk to them about it. Sell the idea to them, show your enthusiasm. Take the time to research the editor's name (in print or online copies) and make it personal; tell them a bit about you and your drive. Connecting with an editor personally is the best way to ensure that they're honest and take the time to explain things to you.
Also - read website 'submission guidelines' - they'll outline how to do it. Most mags and journals have them online.

Unsolicited material - that just means they won't publish it unseen. If you email them and propose the story to them, and they're interested in having a read, that is solicited. It's just a term for their conscious interest in your piece. You don't need an agent (though I work in non-fiction, and if you're going longer, you might look into that. but you don't need an agent for a one-time publishing in a mag or journal).

Self-publish - I can't answer that, but read and discuss with people who can here:
http://www.writers.net/forum/
and here:
http://www.freelancewriting.com/forums/index.php
The Freelancewriting site also has a list of markets that you can approach, it's a good tool. Be wary of scammers, etc, use your wits and be familiar with the journal/mag first, either in print or online.

If it's really what you want to do with your life, get into it. Read about how to go about it, from library books and online forums/sites. I haven't studied journalism and now it's my career (as well as being mom) - I've just learned through reading and experience. If I can, you can.

I'll check back if anyone wants to ask me about my ideas, or PM me.

Go well
Rebecca
little_idiot
Another important thing is to get to know the market you want to write for. In a writing workshop last year, my prof had us read a ton of lit mags and then decide how our work would or wouldn't fit. I write mostly short stories and occasionally essays and poetry, so I was reading pretty widely for this project. I found some magazines that were way above my level (think the New Yorker) and some that I wouldn't even WANT my work in. Some do themed issues, and some magazines always have the same theme, like nature or urban issues or whatever. Some only publish poetry, or short stories; some will take photos or artwork as well.
Reading the contributor's notes can be pretty intimidating--most of the writers are already very established, have a PhD. from Yale or have won the Pushcart Prize or have had 6 books published, but there are usually at least one or two that haven't had anything published before. Some magazines especially welcome material from unknown writers. clmp.org has some good information for writers.
cleanoldguy
'little_idiot', who clearly isn't an idiot, says: "Another important thing is to get to know the market you want to write for...."

Absolutely essential. Otherwise you're shooting blindly into midair, hoping to hit a duck.

One other bit of advice: Read online magazines. There are thousands of them, ranging from dreadful to wonderful, and on any subject you could conceivably be interested in.

Very few online magazines pay anything, but many are well regarded places to be published and your pieces there are quite respectable. The days of "only print publication counts" are long gone. Ezines are an excellent way to build your bibliography.

Here are a few good literary ezines; all have links to others, so potentially you could be reading a long time. Check the submission guidelines on the ones that appeal to you, and good luck.

http://webdelsol.com/

http://eclectica.org/

http://alsopreview.com/

http://www.2river.org/

http://www.poetserv.org/index.html

For magazines on your own pet subjects? That's why God gave us Google (and the annual "Writer's Market" books).

spirit lust
Yep, good points, little_idiot (not) and cleanoldguy (heh!).
One thing that's often brought up on writer's forums is the issue of writing for exposure vs writing for pay. A lot of writers begin with non-paying markets and move on to only wriitng for payment. That's how I went about it too. Some people have this "writers should never write for free" hautiness that I think is unfair to all the wonderful struggling and new mags/ezines out there. Some of my favourite markets can't afford to pay writers, but have good and established writers working for them. It all depends on how much time you have and how niche your interests are, I guess. I'd like to write for more good yet unpaid markets, but don't have the time, unfortunately. I support them in other ways, and I only write for pay.
Good writing!
faith
Anyone doing NaNoWriMo? (http://www.nanowrimo.org/) I thought perhaps last year some people here were trying it. If you're not familiar, it's a motivating deadline to write a 50,000 "work of lengthy fiction" in one month (November). It seems like a good exercise, even if it obviously wouldn't be a super-polished masterpiece. Or is this not the appropriate thread for such things?
bunnyb
it's definitely the right (or write) thread for this! I remember it being mentioned last year, it's such a good idea - even if you get 20% of well-written words out of it, it's worth it, polishing can come later. It's a good exercise for discipline, reaching daily quota and blitz writing.
wombat
Oh, RATS!! I only discovered NaNoWriMo at the end of the month last year and then I forgot this year -- just PLUM FORGOT!!

One of these days -- I have two novels lurking around in here. I really wish I had a group for writing, for music, for the web/computer stuff too where we could just compare notes and share resources and not be ... competitive in a crappy way.

In a way, Bust boards are cool this way and in a way they're not.
raisingirl
Bumping for Free Spirit.
wombat
thankee, raisin! I think the trouble is that creative stuff is not a group endeavor.

I always envied film makers and people in bands for this reason. I mean, their creative stuff is a group endeavor.

I have gotten less done because i didn't want to feel like the stereotyped dorky eccentric hiding away to do my stuff.
chachaheels
Oh, Wombat, the collective creative endeavor can be a communal nightmare of epic proportions. It's not always as rosy as one thinks and there is always someone who delights in frustrating the process somehow.

Can you tell I've come to prefer the lonely frustration of kicking my own ass into gear? At least it's only one person to be frustrated with!

I found a couple of writers' sites that might spur you on, if you're in the mood to do some writing:

writing exercises and 50 tools to help you in writing

Have fun!
wombat
True enough, chacha!
sukouyant
Bumpity bump
Moonpieluv
Ohhh... yes. I've been backed up blocked like a reststop toilet in ole'kentucky for some years now. People tell me to write, damn it. But.. I don't. I'll take those suggestions down below... and I have some good books that my mee-maw gave me...

I like books, want to be around them, and want to eventually write one.
That's why I want to work in a library.. hoping all the great authors and what not will blow some writer's dust under the ass and get me started again.

I already have a buddy who is published and lives in SF....

blargh.
sukouyant
Moonluvpie, The Bustie formerly (currently? where are you??) known as Miss Thing posted a writing exercise in this thread that sounded like fun and worked for her to loosen her ink.

This site over here: http://www.100words.com
To play you need to write 100 words, no more, no less, everyday for a month. The craft is in the commitment and the outside limitations imposed.

This is them: "You can write about anything you want. Anything. Some people open tiny windows into their lives; others write surrealist poetry. Some writers post finely tuned, perfectly crafted vignettes; others show up at the end of the night and spew drunken nonsense onto the screen."
bunnyb
QUOTE(Moonpieluv @ Jul 31 2007, 08:15 PM) *
I like books, want to be around them, and want to eventually write one.


Those are my sentiments too, moonpieluv.

On that note: I started to write a novel today. I've wanted to be a writer since I was knee-high to a grasshopper and I'm not putting it off any longer. I have no idea whether what I've written today will go anywhere, whether there will be a finished product or if it will take me off in another direction writing something else but I've started and I'm excited.

The premise of the novel is an idea I've had for a couple of years and it will involve a lot of work and research but I think I can do it. I don't have all of the elements yet or a fully-fledged plot but I'm writing down what I do have: so far that is an opening chapter (to work on) and a tentative closing line as well as the overall, if vague idea.

I've recently moved from PC to Mac and love Apple's Pages - it comes with its own storyboard creator! Has anyone done a storybook before? I read during the week that they are a must for pitches so thought I'd buy a storyboard book but now I've discovered I can do it from my macbook! I'm going to use it to structure my proposed novel but have no idea where to start...

I have a couple of other writing projects I'm toying with and want to discipline myself to write a regular book blog but The Book is the main thing.

100 words a day, if nothing else.
raisingirl
MissThing has migrated to LJ-land and she does still do those 100 word exercises!

Bunny, I don't think I've done a storybook or board before, but that program sounds like fun.

After several years of avoiding it, I do think I want to try my hand at poetry.

I surround myself with books, but I sure do miss writing.
girlbomb
The 100 word commitment sounds great. Also, as corny and hack as this may sound, I found Julia Cameron's The Artist's Way to be super helpful. The morning pages (mine are more like lunch pages) are, twelve years after I started doing them, still the best thing that ever happened for my writing. Of course, I still experience episodes of block and fear and frustration too, during which I want to drop dead.
bunnyb
I need to discipline myself to write morning pages; hell, just to do the 100 words a day!

off-topic: I didn't know that Julia Cameron used to be married to Martin Scorcese!
Moonpieluv
Thanks for keeping this thread going! I still haven't written a thing, but it's like I'm afraid to write cause there's a lot in there, ya know....

Wish I could write more, but.... my IT guy monitors the crap outta us. strict... but I'll be up and running (and writing?) soon!
raisingirl
Oh no, GB. No, no, no, no, no! *rubs eyes*

Are they really the best thing that have happened to you? Because if you're saying this, I have to accept it as truth! And I don't want to do that! I loved your book (and am eagerly awaiting the second one, oh yes I am), I totally think you are such an inspiration as a writer, and to know that the morning pages worked for you... well, that's something, all right.

I tried the morning pages and Artist's Way dealie several years ago. I really tried them. But I COULD NOT STAND IT! It did nothing for me. It made me feel like a retard. I did it with a group of friends and I can't believe any of them even want to talk to me anymore, I bitched about the Artist's Way so much back then. I tried to keep an open mind, blah blah blah, what we're most resistant to is sometimes what we most need, so on and so forth, but I couldn't stand the morning pages, the artist dates, etc. It was something for the life of me I could not get into.

Oh, and you know what? I was actually writing for an audience back then. Sure, it was a small audience, I'm sure, but I was still writing and had to deal with deadlines and rewriting and all of that. Somehow I was able to do that without the aid of the MPs.

I still love you, GB, but I don't love the morning pages -- or Julia Cameron for that matter.

Different strokes for this folk, I guess.

I think what I hated about it so much was that for the longest time all I had been hearing was OHHHH THE ARTIST'S WAY IS SO WONDERFUL!!!!!! BIBLE BIBLE BIBLE!!!!!!!! MUST READ AND ABSORB ALL ITS GOODNESS!!!!!!!!! so maybe I had some lofty high expectations for it and when it just didn't jive with me (I don't know, I don't like her writing style, for one -- or her philosophy, for that matter), I ended up throwing it clear across the living room repeatedly until the spine cracked.

But I do vehemently agree with making the time and space for writing (or any pursuit, really, that one wants to improve at), making it a daily (or almost daily) commitment, to be done even when you're NOT IN THE MOOD. Especially when you're NOT IN THE MOOD. I think it helps to clear out the cobwebs.

Anyway, those are my thoughts and I'm sticking to them. I'm glad we're resurrecting this thread. I'm off to write now, in longhand.
tatiana
Arrrgh. I've had four months off in betweeen terms and I've written a grand total of 3 or 4 pages. I was supposed to be finished these two stories by now so I could try to write something with a hope of commercial viability.

100 words a day? I'd settle for 50 at this point.
girlbomb
Oh, raisingirl, I know -- the whole Artist's Way thing is so twee, and such a cult. I totally don't blame you for being put off by it; whenever I recommend it, I recommend it in a whisper, with a million caveats about how corny it is. I never did the "artist's date," or any of the other exercises -- the only thing I did was daily free-writing in my notebook (that's probably a better thing to call it than "morning pages"), but that was the thing that got me really going, and keeps me going.

The thing is, we can set as many page count goals as we want, but if we don't know WHAT to write those pages about, it's still going to be frustrating. I still experience this every time I finish a project -- the blank page looms in front of me, like, "What now? What now? What now?" And I definitely know the feeling of wanting to write but being afraid of the painful subject matter. It's not an easy task, writing, but if you've ever felt the calling to write, you're shit out of luck -- you've got to answer it, or you'll feel unfulfilled.
raisingirl
Hee. I like that we are talking about this, GB! Free writing, yes! Free association. Write, don't think.

I was fond of calling them Mourning Pages.

Sometimes I'd just write stuff like "you think you call yourself a writer, bigshot?" Just to get the inner critic to talk until it can say any more.

Yeah, hokey is what I think of the whole thing. It's just crazy that she has some people who are such fervent fans (not like I know any of them personally -- they probably wouldn't even talk to me). My group of friends that were doing it kind of acknowledged the twee-ness of it. But my god, I still find her annoying. She's probably one of those people who's all "I want my fish poached with the sauce on the side, no ice in my soda, a teaspoon for my soup, hold the cream, etc." You know? It's like ALRIGHT ALREADY!!!!!!!

And with that said, I'll shut up about this subject. Julia, if you're reading this (heh), I'm sure you're a decent person, but I still hate your book.

So I still think doing something SIMILAR TO the MPs is a good practice, no matter what one wants to call it. You have to do something to warm up, stretch the muscles, etc., before going in for the kill.

I think I want to do that nano whateveritscalled this November, but I might do it in longhand. Is that totally crazy? Notebooks are on sale at all the drugstores just in time for school, so I might as well stock up. My eyes go buggy if I look at a computer screen too long -- it would be a pain in the butt to go back on the computer and try to examine, edit, or salvage anything if I do do this in November. I think I'm more visual/tactile and need to have it on paper. But I don't know, I find that my writing voice changes if I change my method (typing vs. writing vs. talking into a tape recorder). Not that this is a bad thing, but just something to consider. I'm all for experimentation.
sybarite
*laughing as raisin rips apart The Artist's Way*

Apologies to everyone it works for. I never read it so I can't comment but the blurb on the back was enough to put me off I'm afraid.

I just want to chime in and say what works for me is, as raisin says, just writing as often as possible, even if it's shit. Give yourself permission for it to be shit, but don't stop. Editing processes work for a reason; try not to sweat the quality when you're churning, or eking, out the words.

I should say I'm currently not writing fiction, but a thesis, which is a very different and arguably more straightforward process. I also used to write for a living, mostly web content. When I had a looming deadline I would write first thing in the morning and it worked really well. Somehow being half-conscious sped me up rather than slowed me down.

I'm glad this thread is moving again. I've never really written about my writing but I have to say it's kind of cathartic thinking about which process works for you. Anyway, the above is just my 2 cents. Really, if you've found an approach that works for you, use it.

Saying all the above... of course I'm typing here instead of, um, writing more of my thesis...
sukouyant
QUOTE(girlbomb @ Aug 22 2007, 08:21 AM) *
.. It's not an easy task, writing, but if you've ever felt the calling to write, you're shit out of luck -- you've got to answer it, or you'll feel unfulfilled.


well if that statement doesn't give me a kick in the pants nothing will (and it did this morning!)
very inspiring to read the advice and personal methods in this thread.
sukouyant
the thread killah!
girlbomb
No, it's just that everybody's so busy, uh, writing!

Here's the bad thing I've been doing: talking about the piece I'm writing too much. Bad girlbomb! WRITE the story, don't talk about it! The only one I should be talking about it with is myself, in my notebook. When the first draft is done, then I can talk about it all I want. But right now I'm letting all the steam escape out my damn mouth.
sukouyant
QUOTE(girlbomb @ Aug 30 2007, 06:31 PM) *
No, it's just that everybody's so busy, uh, writing!

Here's the bad thing I've been doing: talking about the piece I'm writing too much. Bad girlbomb! WRITE the story, don't talk about it! The only one I should be talking about it with is myself, in my notebook. When the first draft is done, then I can talk about it all I want. But right now I'm letting all the steam escape out my damn mouth.

God I have been doing this too - and everytime I'm about to do it again I think "I'm fucking myself", and I still do it! People keep asking about it, and I feel obligated to answer them.. I might start making up some lie to discuss with people, instead of making my creative work small talk.

I was reflecting this morning on why I write anything. Definitely it's this impulse to make myself understood, and writing is one of the few ways I've felt any confidence in accomplishing that (then of course I'm always at the mercy of people's literacy and willingness to read. Do ya ever wish you had tried to be a rockstar instead?). But to my frustration, I still find it difficult to make myself understood- It's still this struggle and psychodrama, and it makes me hate writing too.

(but then the reward when it finally happens)
eta (or maybe it's not a reward so much as relief that i don't have to write anymore, for a little while)
bunnyb
I shouldn't have told anyone I had made tentative steps towards writing a book because now they're asking how it's going, how much I've written, how many words and I feel bad because I haven't been working on it since the last time I mentioned it.

For an aspiring writer, I don't write very much. That's why I need to religiously do the morning pages. It's a combination of insecurity, writer's block and laziness. Sigh.

Replying to previous Q (was that here or on a blog/something else I read?): I would only call myself an actual writer (as opposed to "I'm writing" or "I want to be a writer") if I was published.
Alotta Errata
Bunny... that's how I feel about telling people that I'm applying to PhD programs. Now what happens if I don't get in?

I'm supposed to be writing a thesis right now. Guess how much I've actually done? mmmmmmm nuthin. and it's not that i don't want to, I love my topic, i'm just scared shitless and I don't know why.
sukouyant
Alotta, me too on an current academic essay. Love the topic, pretty much know my s**&, but I look at the people I'm reading and think "I could never write like them." which shuts me up pretty quick. It's all in my head of course.
Morning writing actually seems to be helping with that. (And it has to be at some farmer hour, like 5AM for me) As soon as I get up and my inhibitions are low, I find I can start writing.

Something that helped to organize my thoughts & points to include is creating an outline from a flow chart that I brainstormed with bubbles and arrows leading from main ideas. Chaos to structure.

Just do it lady. Your research isn't going to be the worst that's ever been done, and it's not going to be the best either, until you give yourself and your mentor something to work with.
girlbomb
QUOTE(bunnyb @ Sep 3 2007, 04:50 PM) *
I would only call myself an actual writer (as opposed to "I'm writing" or "I want to be a writer") if I was published.


Really? No way! I think being an actual writer has everything to do with writing, and nothing to do with being published. I think I was a writer long before I got published -- I was a writer when I wrote the poems and stories that I did in grade school. I think a writer is anybody who feels impelled to write, and does it. bunnyb, I think you're an actual writer.
bunnyb
In my heart I'm a writer but I think that introducing myself as a writer or describing myself as one in public would sound pretentious. I don't want to come across as if I'm posturing when it's something that means so much to me. I am not syaing that if someone did likewise I would think they were pretentious but I have a mental-block about saying it myself.

I do agree though that I was a writer when I was child and that I am a writer now but I don't produce enough (in my eyes) to be classed as an actual writer. It was obviously a blog I was reading where this discussion took place ... the people posting where very disparaging on unpublished writers calling themselves writers.

I suppose it depends on your perception of what a writer should be and their perception boiled down to being published or not. At this stage, I still qualify myself as being a writer at heart and an aspiring published writer but not an actual writer; perhaps that is a huge insecurity on my part.

/ponders.
crazyoldcatlady
QUOTE(bunnyb @ Sep 6 2007, 07:07 PM) *
In my heart I'm a writer but I think that introducing myself as a writer or describing myself as one in public would sound pretentious. I don't want to come across as if I'm posturing when it's something that means so much to me. I am not syaing that if someone did likewise I would think they were pretentious but I have a mental-block about saying it myself.


/ponders.


word.


:::off to stare at notebook to have it stare at me..:::
raisingirl
Well, since I'm always gonna be a Smug Twat, I'm gonna call myself a writer until the end of time and then some. So there! No shame. I don't see it as posturing, I honestly don't.

While I'm (still) on my soapbox of Things I Hate About the Craft and Myths that are Perpetuated, I HATE THAT WRITING DOWN THE BONES BOOK. Have you seen this book? It is HORRIBLE. Completely useless drivel. One of my friends was really into this book and it was one of many reasons I had to quit her. It doesn't hold a candle (cliche, natch) to Artist's Way and you all know what I think about THAT one. I am not shitting you. It's even worse. You've been warned.

I love that we can come here and talk about the process. Because a big part of that, for me, is acknowledging the stuff that doesn't help me.

I have a letter I've been meaning to write for years now. There have been many times I've been on a long walk or just sitting on the subway and I've composed the entire thing in my head. I've finally put pen to paper and I'm still working on it and really want to polish it and send it off to its recipient, a writer who I look up to and also see as a father figure of sorts, who ran a writing workshop -- the last one I took, in fact, before I began my period of Not Writing. I'm still trying to figure out my motivation for writing to him. It's a complicated story and I know I'm being vague right now. (No, I didn't sleep with him.)

I wish Maimy was still Lounging so she could participate. Le sigh.
girlbomb
bunnnyb, I totally get where you're coming from about not wanting to sound pretentious. When people ask me what I do, and I say I'm a writer, I always feel defensive and weird, like they're not going to believe me, or they don't take me seriously. A saleswoman asked me today what I did and I said, "Editorial work." It just sounds more legit sometimes.

And raisingirl, I think letter writing is an awesome way to get material down. I recently read Francine Prose's READING LIKE A WRITER, and she talks about narrative voice -- everyone always asks themselves, "Who's telling this story?", but she says "Who are they telling this story to?" is just as important a question. Material seems to come easier to me when I can picture my audience. I hope the exercise will be very inspiring and fruitful for you.
raisingirl
Thanks, GB, and I'm going to have to find that book at the library today. Come to think of it, this writer I'm writing to (ha) always stressed the importance of reading in conjunction with writing.
Garlic
QUOTE(girlbomb @ Sep 6 2007, 05:06 PM) *
Really? No way! I think being an actual writer has everything to do with writing, and nothing to do with being published. I think I was a writer long before I got published -- I was a writer when I wrote the poems and stories that I did in grade school. I think a writer is anybody who feels impelled to write, and does it. bunnyb, I think you're an actual writer.


Yeah, I'd agree with this, and seriously. There is some very bad writing that is published and some very good writing that is rejected. Are airport fiction writers any more of a writer than someone of quality who can't get published cause there's not judged to be a big enough audience for their work?

And what about people who write for zines and amateur journalists? They are published, but the establishment has not sanctioned their work. Where do they stand? Writers or not?

On a different topic, I'm working on some historical fiction, and need to go back and do some research (on two exact dates, and the area where a massacre took place), but am going straight ahead with it otherwise and will edit it later. Bad idea? Should I put more work in first? And how much time do you think one should spend in an area if you're going to write about it? I know Steph Penney spent all her time researching The Tenderness of Wolves in the British Library, and good for her, but IMO you can often tell if a writer actually knows an area. Does anyone else think this? I can't read DH Lawrence without my eyes widening, or Lawrie Lee for that matter, as I'm very familiar with all the places they describe.
bunnyb
As previously explained, it is my reasoning for not calling myself a writer in public; it has nothing to do with my opinion of other people who are writers, published or not.

I don't think you could possibly put an amount of time on how long another writer should research; in depends on the research topic, their method of research and how quickly they work. I will research until I know my subject inside and out and I won't write about something until I have fully researched it, whether it takes me two months or two years.
crazyoldcatlady
i think i might start coming out of the writer's closet. if i own up to it, at least, that will push me to do something, to prove something.

i had a great session last night, courtesy of 100words.com. not earth shattering, but more than i've come up with in a while, and i was pleased with it. i told a friend today; she said she had called me later but figured i was asleep. i said no, i got this second wind and rode this huge wave and wrote until around 1 am. she gave me an "oh yeah?" which was neither a judgemental nor petty retort. she seemed a bit intrigued, actually. but she's kinda out there like that anyway, so it didn't feel like i was confessing to my grandmother that i was masturbating or someting.

garlic- i say forge ahead with the story and fill in the blanks later. i can't rememeber what author said this, but i always remembered this: in some interview, he was asked if he draws from real life or makes things up. he said something along the lines of "making shit up is half the fun."
raisingirl
Confession time.

I still haven't sent that letter to The Writer. For now I've just put it away. I'm still not happy with it.

And I still haven't read that book that GB recommended. I took it out of the library and have since renewed it, but have yet to crack it open.

Eh.

For those of you with day jobs, how do you find a balance and make time to write? I am trying to find or make consistency with many things, writing being one of them. I remember reading from more than one person about finding time at the edges of the day to write. Problem is, my edges are already frayed and I think some mending is in order.
crinoline

garlic- I have found that it works for me to go ahead and write out everything you have. You can always go back and change it later, add in the facts, remove any inconsistencies. Good luck, I love historical fiction!
raisingirl
Are any of you going to do nanowrimo this year?
sukouyant
I still don't have the time or da' noive. Maybe next year for me.
Are you doing it Raisin? How much time do you generally spend preparing to start before November?
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2014 Invision Power Services, Inc.