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pepper
oh man, my mom innundated me with the ancient meaning and uses of the word cunt and it's derivatives when i was way young and it still squicks me out to use it in context, as in referring to my parts. i'd no sooner call it a cunt than i would a yoni or flower, gah.
the only time i will use it is in a severly derogatory context. like the french use the names of holy relics as curse words, taking it totally out of context is blasphemous. so, using it to refer to anything other than girly bits = the worst possible thing to say.
i guess i feel comfortable using it in that context because i Have one and therefore own the word in a sense. but i would never use the "n" word because i'm not dark enough to be considered black and so don't and could never own that word at all in any context except for an insulting one. huh, interesting discussion.
bklynhermit
tyger, i agree with you about the voldemort thing. however, i still feel like it's not my place. whereas it IS my place to take back dyke, queer, cunt, etc.

i've never felt particularly up to Bitch, though. i do read 'bitch' magazine and proudly display it on my coffee table. i've just never been into the ways of reclaiming it, i guess. that whole bitch-as-endearment thing never felt authentic to me. whereas i can use 'cunt' (in theory, see below) to describe a part of my body that does actually need a non-technical name. cunt is useful in certain regards. bitch is not, for me.

and, hummingbird, you raise an interesting point. which caused me to realize that until i moved up north at age 18, i had never heard the word cunt. i think my first exposure to it was probably in a women's studies class. which is probably why it's so much easier for me to reclaim.
hummingbird
bklnhermit, about reclaiming the word bitch. some black women use bitch to describe themselves and/or their friends as a replacement to the word woman, but they would still be ready to fight if an enemy called them a bitch. in fact, now that i think about it, i used to say bitch a lot, like, "this bitch did so and so". it was ok if the girl using it to describe said bitch was a friend. most boys couldn't use it without offending. i don't use it now though. although, i really like women who are bitches because in some cases "bitches" are women who are out spoken, confrontational, powerful, tough, rule-breaking, rowdy, unconventional ladies. don't get me wrong, some women are not bitches, they are assholes. i think when women say she's a bitch what they mean is like she is a female asshole????? maybe????
bklynhermit
YES!

i love it when women are 'bitches', in the exact sense you just said.

and i agree that women and men use the term differently. when i call a woman a bitch (or a man a bitch, for that matter, personally i'm in favor of making it gender neutral), i mean she's an ass. i use it pretty interchangeably with shithead, asshole, douche, etc. when a guy calls a woman a bitch, what i hear is 'uppity'.

i also think it's interesting that when men call women 'bitch' it means they're too aggressive, whereas when they call men 'bitch' it means womanish or weak. doublethink much?
venetia
And bitch is a word I don't reclaim because I'm from a rural background and half the time they really were just farm dogs!

I have to admit I've always enjoyed my SO's totally gender neutral use of insults. Everyone bad is just an "arsehole".

Also cunt has different weight depending on which side of the atlantic (or pasifik :-) ) you're on. Men who just call each other "daft cunts" lightly, that's no different to me than "silly prick" - a sad relic of our society's shame about some of our best bits, but nothing to start a fight about.

It's when I hear a man use "cunt!" against a woman, saying it with venom like it's the worst possible thing in the universe, that's when it bothers me.
hummingbird
venetia, this made me laugh out loud, "And bitch is a word I don't reclaim because I'm from a rural background and half the time they really were just farm dogs!"

venetia
tee hee :-)
crazyoldcatlady
hmmm...

black men quietly combating steretypes
bklynhermit
"The rules of the game are universal: White moves first, then black moves," he said. "Black has to respond to the moves that the whites make. You take the advantage when it's available."

i'm speechless.
meetay
I am so white. Seriously, who cares, anyway?
chinichin
Er, those who aren't white?? :-)

ETA, and those who are white but don't subscribe to the ideology of a dominant race?

Sorry if you were kidding, Meetay ... not finding that so funny right now.
rantrave88
I like that venetia - everybody bad in an arsehole.

I find different needs for bitch, cunt, douchebag for any gender depending on the actions. I suppose being passive-agressive is more "bitch" behavior rather than rudeness which is reserved for "dicks". (I also don't think tool/cunt/etc. serve to disrespect actual genetalia) context, yaar.

(chinny i feel like i'm followingyou, but I promise i'm not a stalker even tho I adore you!)
keenkitty
I gotta say this thread made me go..."wha?" I didn't know what to exspect!

I'm half souix half zimbabwean and am FOREVER being called "white privledged" Which I think is ironic at best. Our parents fought for everything we had not because of our race but because of our financial stature, we had a lot of kids and we were poor. I didn't feel under or over privledged. With 10 kids we had a pretty good mix of humanity. Two brothers were blind, one was developmentally delayed, one was dyslexic, My sister, borther and I (T,J and myself) were hypoglycemic and I have Spinal cord and degenerative joint disease (Syringomyelia) some of us were adopted but we were all mixed up racially and biologically..the only real difference that divided us was biology.

I don't really think anyone is any particular race anymore. My husband happens to be a red head from scottland but speaks french and his father claims to be an emmigrant from germany...

My point is we are all people, not even similarily "shade" genus or even nationality. But we have the smae biological parts. Biology is a privledge I can agree with . That is, it is a privledge I am thankful for having the biological makeup I do.

I believe in biology. Biology has told us that the only homogenus citizens left on this planet are in fact mostly indigenous. There are studies that show that we all share the same traits as Pangean theorists. Even those before-mentioned indigenous.

So...in a way arn't we all just diffeent shades of humanity? I like that. I subscribe to the idea that we are not seperate races or colours but citizens of a planet called earth.

Bring up someone from another universe or biological makeup maybe then we can argue privledges and semantics! I know my two brothers who are blind would tell you they feel people who can see are more privledged. Just food for thought.

~KnKtty
themasochistmuse
"So...in a way arn't we all just diffeent shades of humanity? I like that. I subscribe to the idea that we are not seperate races or colours but citizens of a planet called earth."

I love what you said. And, I fully agree. smile.gif I couldnt have possibly said it better. You are a very keen kitty! wink.gif
lucizoe
keenkitty, "privilege" in this case does not refer to your financial status; rather, it's the advantages one gains in a white-dominated society simply by virtue of being white...a certain attitude one acquires whilst growing up, if you will, because interactions with the dominant culture all reinforce your existence. The problem is not necessarily that you exploit your privilege, but that the culture (in the US, at least) hands you that privilege. You have it, if you're white, whether you want to acknowledge it or not...and as idealistic and happy as the citizens of Planet Earth idea is, it's simply not reality for the non-white citizens of America (which is the only place I can speak for), particularly since we seem to have more than our fair share of racist yahoos in this country, especially populating the upper echelons of the US government

unless maybe you understood that and I misread you...
maryjo
The thing is, it's a widely accepted fact that races are not biologically distinct. Race is a social category the same way that, say, nationality is. Some people in some contexts are privileged or disempowered because of the racial or national grouping they belong to or are perceived as belonging to; in the US and not a few other places besides, the dominant racial group is white and those who are or are perceived as white have the privilege of belonging to or being perceived to belong to the group which has a long history of dominating, enslaving, building empires on the backs of and generally not being very nice to those in other groups.

We are all citizens of planet earth, of course, and the world would be a better place if more people could recognise that more often. But part of trying to build a more egalitarian society is recognising the distinctions and inequalities which hinder that recognition. If we don't recognise the ways in which we are privileged, how can we hope to debunk, criticise or refuse (if we ever can refuse) that privilege?

That's what discussions like this thread are for, not a big party going 'oh, isn't it great to be white'.
sybarite
I couldn't have put it better maryjo. So thanks for writing that, so I didn't have to try!
maryjo
Thanks sybarite! I fear my academic-ness is all too visible, though...
tesao
i know everyone is going to laugh at me, but it just occurred to me that i could come and post in the Fword threads and not have to deal with trolls anymore. i can actually even say the word TROLL instead of some euphamism!! it is sort of a DUH moment combined with a YAY one.

living in africa is really bringing a lot of previously academic things to life for me. despite having visited africa many many many times, living here is different. living next door to south africa, in a country that was colonised and treated like dren by whites, makes me hate being white. the neighboring whites BLEW THINGS UP like roads, hospitals, schools.....in order to undermine a free black nation. that sort of hate astounds me.

and the privilege is still there. it may be a hangover from the colonial times, it might be that i am upper level management, but there is still a lot of deference made to me on the part of the black, native people that i work with, people look down instead of at me, people are very careful to always call me Doctora.

i can totally understand why the ministry of health is anti-expatriate. who are WE to come and tell THEM how to run THEIR ministry of health? THEIR country? we are the reason that they are so poor to begin with.

living here reminds me of someone that has a multiple personality disorder.

samora machel is one of my new heros. his first wife josina is even more. i was happy to note that here she is as famous as he was, one of the first important freedom fighters and how she and samora met. there is a national holiday here, in her honour, and in hounour of all of the national women.

i think i may be blathering now, which means that it is time to stop.
nohope
Great post tesao.

Unrelated.. Just wanted to point out again… that I think a lot of the time when we talk about racisms what we are really talking about is white supremacy…

i.e. white privilege comes from a white supremacist society…. And is conferred regardless of an individuals believe in racism. It’s enough for others to believe in race. Or for that matter for people in the past to believe in race and laws and social customs perpetuating the white supremacist ideology those for bearers established.

That’s my take on it.
erinjane
Bumped for hummingbird!
hummingbird
oh, here it is! thanks erinjane!

What do people think about this: white privelegde = freedom. When the United States government claims that we're fighting for freedom, I decode that as more and more and more freedom for white people. Here I exclude poor white people, somewhat, because they don't have the same swagger because they know what oppression is too, even though their skin is still white.

It's hard to put all of this down into words, and I am at work, but I wanted to see what your (everyone, not just busties of color) thoughts are?

This freedom or privelegde makes it easier to start your own businesses or run your own co-ops or DIY. Do you guys/girls understand what I am saying. It's a mind set like mental slavery vs. mental freedom. Oppression of the mind. So, look at the ghetto. The ghetto is not just that way because they don't have a lot of money, they could DIY, but they aren't free enough to realize it, mentally, sometimes physically, emotionally, spiritually. And don't get me wrong there are a lot of brown and black kids that are DIY-ing it but it's only focused on DIY your own mixtapes or whatever---mc-ing and dj-ing and breaking...but all the other ways to DIY, just aren't happening there. Why, no freedom no access. Well, I may have gone off of my own topic now. Wondering what the wonderful busties thoughts are?
sybarite
Briefly, because it's late for me here: I think it is about resources, and access to those resources.

It is certainly more likely that if you are middle class you have greater access to money, either through earning it at work or by having better credit, resulting in a better chance at getting a sizeable loan from a bank.

However, other resources also apply, such as a good education (providing the degree so often required in the kind of workplace which will pay well, provide health benefits etc) and/or health care, a safe neighbourhood to live in, good role models growing up.

The more resources you have, the better chance you have to be 'free', where freedom means freedom from oppression, because the above resources can cushion you against that oppression, where oppression = discrimination.

That's a tiny nutshell. Ultimately any discrimination is also linked (although not necessarily caused by) to economic deprivation, which can be caused in turn by... lack of resources. For starters.
hummingbird
sybarite, yes, mmm...must contemplate how to express myself better...i am trying to get at something deeper...must work now...will think some more....
sybarite
Are you getting at a mindset? Because of course that applies too...
hummingbird
It's like this, I see the white priveledge thing and it makes me want to rip it from those that have it. It's frustrating, you know, it can make one do strange things. Maybe this should go in the confessions. My post was long because I was trying to over-explain and maybe sugar-coat the fact that I have warped thoughts sometimes because it's not fair. And yet, to confess even further, I feel like, maybe by osmosis I have attained some of this priveledge, I've got a higher education, I talk standard english, I can write, I can fake a certain degree of gentileness (?)...I know how to act in an all white environment, in a way, that diffuses most of the inert racism that comes my way, ahem, my boyfriend and my closest girls are white. I have crossed into that world, somewhat mellow.gif, I could never pass for white in a million years, unless maybe I talk to you on the phone and even then some slang and ebonics are bound to come spilling out rolleyes.gif . I don't like it, 100%, though. I'd rather be in the freaking jungles of Jamaica. I always feel the need to be around other people of color. And yet, I want more of "it", more freedom and more of that priveledge. And I will never have "it" totally because I will never be white. And the other side of me says, "and thank god for that!" I like being me. But, I have had to weed out a lot of internalized racism, and in dealings with my white friends I wish more white people had access to classes that deconstruct white priveledge and the insidious ways that it plays out in relation to other people who aren't white. This is what goes on...in my head...there I was as honest as I could be...
venetia
I think there might be a mental/mindset side of things that is caused by lack of access to real things - infrastructure, knowledge, options, services. Like, I was remembering recently a time when we were walking along and we saw the police arresting some glue sniffers and homeless types. So I stopped with my hands on my hips and watched the police the whole time they loaded these people into a van, because I knew they wouldn't do anything too bad to them while I was there. The police first stared back but when we didn't leave they became quite self conscious.

Anyway I was discussing this with my SO who said he felt really afraid at that time, that the police could beat us up or whatever, and I was explaining that I felt no fear because I know the system is geared towards me and my white skin and the middle-class accent I can do if I try and the university I work for etc. I mean, privilege. I sort of train myself to pretend that the law is there to serve and protect me, even though my background experience is very different.
thereshegoes
i think i understand the DIY mindset idea, somewhat, to be that even if white people are working class/poor, and therefore don't have class privilege (parents to pay rent/art school tuition while they craft, etc), at least they can look around at those who are sucessful and see they are part of the same cultural whole? like a poor white girl may not have the bank to pull it off, but she can look at chan marshall or other indie icons and feel she is a part of what they speak to/for? and therefore be more likely to make the sacrifices to pull of her own project?

that makes sense. but poor while people aren't as culturally oriented towards indie/DIY culture as one may think. it's still a lot of NASCAR and jesus. but it's still probably easier to break away from all that and move to the city and have weird hair if people look like you in your subculture.

not sure if i'm on target here.
sybarite
Speedy made an interesting observation back in the day, comparing the travel styles of people with privilege (demanding good seats, assuming their baggage won't be too heavy, etc) and those without (worried about appearing too demanding). It's specific situations like that and the one venetia descibed below which test your own sense of entitlement, or lack thereof, I think.

I think it may also have to do with aspirations and the difference between what someone from a privileged background can aspire to and what someone from a poorer background can aspire to. Although in the US there's always been the myth that anyone can 'make it' if they work hard enough.
hummingbird
thereshegoes, Yes! You are on the right topic. That's what I am saying. And I agree with what you had to say about poor vs. upper middle class white people and the differences there.

sybarite, have you noticed that in the media its totally okay to make fun of poorer white people, as though their lack of taste or travel expertise or culture are inherent to them and that's why they're poor. It's as though they like being poor and therefore it's okay to make fun of them.
sybarite
Totally hummingbird; I find that especially on shows like Wife Swap, where the producers keep highlighting one family's lack of education, 'taste' etc... and its usually the poor white family they represent as stupid or clueless.

They had an interesting episode with a black family from Harlem, who had a nice brownstone apartment and well behaved kids, and a white suburban family where the kids were all brats, swearing at each other all day (and not in a creative way smile.gif ) The only point to programmes like these is to compare societal status IMO.
venetia
I saw that, and the white woman had never heard of Malcolm X (wtf!!!). In the ones I've seen, they almost always represent the rich family as cold, heartless and disfunctional. I watch them because normally we don't see poor US people on tv at all (we just get things like Survivor, CSI, America's Next Top Model, Martha Stewart, etc) and I'm curious.

I agree about aspirations. Like if you don't even know what gets taught at a university how can you want to study there. Or if you go into a shop and they start following you to see if you're stealing, you might be too intimidated to ask questions about the products.

And then there's the whole money thing. I swear poor people in my experience don't know anything about money. We don't even know how compound interest works much less how to diversify assets.
erinjane
Bumping this thread!

I mentioned a while ago in here that I was reading Inga Muscio's latest book, "Autobiography of a Blue-Eyed Devil: My life and times in a racist, imperialist society", but I just recently finished it.

I enjoyed "Cunt" but I took issue with quite a number of her opinions because she can make some sweeping generalizations. I agreed with it for the most part though and thought it was a good accessable read.

But I LOVED her new one. Again, it's really accessable, but it's also really comprehensive. I'd recommend it to anyone. I'm part of the womyn's centre collective at my Uni and Inga is going to come speak on International Women's Day so I'm hoping she'll talk about racial issues too.

Recently on another Winnipeg-based message board I've been coming across unbelievable statements about Aboriginal peoples. Winnipeg doesn't have a strong black population, and most are immigrants, so a lot of what i read about race issues I translate to aboriginal issues. It's mind-boggling to me the way people have glossed over these issues, people really think it's not a problem or white privilege doesn't exist or that "the natives should just stop complaining and realize they live in a white culture".

Anyways, just some opening thoughts to hopefully get the discussion running again.
wombat
I just saw a "Trading Spouses" that was actually kind of even-handed. The families seemed to be on the same economic level, the contrast was that one was fundamentalist Christian and the other was "rock and rollers." They each had some loving/fun parts and some cruelty/neglect/excess, and they actually managed to learn from each other and adjust a bit.

I've also seen one where the black family was the more wealthy/sterile family, and the white woman who stayed with them coaxed the father out of his radio station studio and made him build a swingset and play with the kids for a change.

Cool to see the ones that *don't* just reinforce stereotypes.

aviatrix
ej, i'd be curious to read inga's take on things since she's from "the wetlands" aka the pacific nor'west. where people pretend like they aren't racist, but it's there. i had a friend move up here from the bay area, she's white and moved to a black area. she's the first to point out all the racism in this city. but then, if philly is the city of brotherly love, then seattle is the city of passive-agressive hate.
bustygirl
QUOTE
And then there's the whole money thing. I swear poor people in my experience don't know anything about money. We don't even know how compound interest works much less how to diversify assets.


As a person who works from home, it galls me to see the nonstop parade of ads aimed at the low-income urban market during daytime TV. They're for different industries, but they all start to run together after a while. There's the low-cost insurance people, ambulance chasers, loan sharks, bankruptcy vultures, rent-to-own people, sell-your-home-quick hucksters, and the check-cashing places. Almost all of these industries charge much higher fees/interest for their services than do their more reputable counterparts. Some of them can actually hurt their consumers (in the cases of the bankruptcy and check-cashing firms).

If I ran the public schools in my town, there would be at least one or two classes devoted to learning simple financial skills, because it seems there's a real lack in the poorer communities, and it pisses me off that people are exploiting this fact to make themselves rich.
aviatrix
there is a whole thing right now about different states changing the laws that govern "payday" loans. basically they rip off poor people living paycheck to paycheck and give them a deeper level of debt... i love this country!
bustygirl
Capitalism at its finest.
erinjane
QUOTE(aviatrix @ Feb 15 2007, 11:51 AM) *

ej, i'd be curious to read inga's take on things since she's from "the wetlands" aka the pacific nor'west. where people pretend like they aren't racist, but it's there. i had a friend move up here from the bay area, she's white and moved to a black area. she's the first to point out all the racism in this city. but then, if philly is the city of brotherly love, then seattle is the city of passive-agressive hate.


Thats an interesting point.
Shes coming to my university in a couple of weeks doing a talk on intersectioning oppressions so im excited to hear what shes got to say.
tankgirl
im not sure if this is the place to put this... maybe it is.

ever notice that although advertisments are trying to get "more diverse" with the people in their adds, when there is a family shown they are all exactly the same. they hardly ever show couples that are interracial... even the couples have the same color hair, same features, same ethnicity. i dont get it, shouldnt diversity actually show some diversity?

edit: not that advertisers matter much to me, but it is what shapes many societys, soemthing everyone sees on a regular basis.
sixelacat
Gah. One of my co-workers was complaining the other day because all of our collateral (brochures and the like) feature all people of color and (to him) no white people. Oh, you poor freakin' thing! Better go home quick and watch some television to feel validated again! Anybody remember Hothead Paisan? It just made me think of the issue where she played a "game" which involved flipping the channel as soon as an image appeared that reinforced the mainstream, i.e. a hetero couple kissing, a man rescuing a woman, etc. She went through some 150 channels in less than 60 seconds....a new record!
sybarite
These examples of ads remind me of The Cosby Show back in the 80s, which if I remember correctly was represented as progressive because it focused on a black family. Ultimately the show simply depicted an all-black (and upper-middle class) universe which was just as unrealistic as, say, Friends was in its depiction of an all-white NYC. If ads or programmes exclusively feature a single race or ethnicity, to me that's just reinforcing polarisation between white and black communities. It's better than no representation of black people at all, but only just IMO if the communities are perennially shown as seperate.
i.iq
QUOTE(aviatrix @ Feb 15 2007, 09:51 AM) *

ej, i'd be curious to read inga's take on things since she's from "the wetlands" aka the pacific nor'west. where people pretend like they aren't racist, but it's there. i had a friend move up here from the bay area, she's white and moved to a black area. she's the first to point out all the racism in this city. but then, if philly is the city of brotherly love, then seattle is the city of passive-agressive hate.



White folks pretend like they aren't racist here, this is true. I go to a public liberal arts school in Washington state (a school known nationwide for having lots of "hippies"), and I am pretty shocked on almost a daily basis at supposed liberals' refusal to acknowledge or even talk about their white privelege. These are the same people who are quick to define themselves as "multicultural" by appropriating things like dreadlocks, who speak as if from experience about racism and oppression of people of color, and who are persistently ignorant of the space they take up in doing so. This seems to be the new form of racism... I can't speak for people in other parts of the country, but I have a suspicion that it is not isolated to the Northwest.
ourcrazycatlady
QUOTE(i.iq @ Mar 14 2007, 06:27 PM) *
White folks pretend like they aren't racist here, this is true. I go to a public liberal arts school in Washington state (a school known nationwide for having lots of "hippies"), and I am pretty shocked on almost a daily basis at supposed liberals' refusal to acknowledge or even talk about their white privelege. These are the same people who are quick to define themselves as "multicultural" by appropriating things like dreadlocks, who speak as if from experience about racism and oppression of people of color, and who are persistently ignorant of the space they take up in doing so. This seems to be the new form of racism... I can't speak for people in other parts of the country, but I have a suspicion that it is not isolated to the Northwest.


hehe, I know exactly which school you speak of. I know students who have gone there . There's a lot of people out there waving their hands shouting "look at me, I'm not racist" but at the same time are still relying on racist stereotypes of culture (the dreadlocks being a great example).

I totally understand the passive-aggressive racism mentioned about the Northwest earlier. There was a story in the news about an African-American couple that were displaced after they sold their house in South Seattle. because it's the new hip, cheaper spot and used to be racially segregated. The richer (i.e. whiter) people are now buying up the cheap property and causing everything to go up in value. Now the couple that sold their house can't afford another one in the same neighborhood. sad.gif Systemic racism, economical? I'm not sure what to call it, but it's happening.
thereshegoes
huh. my partner's from the northwest, and i've been out there, and i see plenty of this, i think it's not just limited to the pac NW, i think anyplace that has a lot of affluent white liberals and not too many black people can produce this phenom. i've seen it in the northeast too, this insistence that they are not racist because they fetishize the stereotypes of blackness, listen to "world" music, read fillintheblank, have a black friend, slept with a black person, that they are TOTALLY immune to white privilege. it weirds me out in the same way as guys who go out of their way to show me how sensitive/feminist/niceguy they are.

not that i think i deserve a cookie for owning my privilege, but i think the denial is counter-intuitive. i'd rather put the energy into working on my hidden prejudices than running from them.
girltrouble
yeah, shegoes, you do have a point there. i grew up in boulder colorado, and when i tell people that they go on and on about how nice it is, but it's super racist and classist. the city council writes laws that will price/push brown people and the poor out of city limits, while they wave their little 'liberal' flag. ugh makes me sick.
thereshegoes
well, having said that, i do think that part of the world is a lot less racist than many parts of the south (where i'm from), but it jerks my chain a bit when people claim to be not "privileged" at all. . . i'd just rather have the honest, ugly dialog.
skinwithoutscars
erinjane, what did you think of inga's discussion of when it is appropriate to use/exploit one's privilege? i haven't read the book in a while, but i think it bugged me at the time because she seemed to be saying it's okay to "use" one's privilege in a certain situation, ie, to avoid getting arrested. what do you all think about that? is it okay/simply being realistic to use one's privilege? i'm a white, upper-middle-class female, and a lot of the culture is basically tailored to those aspects of my identity (but not the feminist, queer, plus-size ones, to give some examples). is it okay to play up the white-female thing in order to not get arrested or raped or robbed?

also, to revisit the topic of words: what are the words y'all use/accept to describe people whose parents are of different races? a professor used the word "mulatto" without comment the other week and i simply didn't know how to react. similarly, i wouldn't use the word "mestizo" casually because i'm from the southwesten u.s. and have associations with it, but i've traveled in central america and heard it used there.
sukouyant
skinwithoutscars...my mom had to report a burglery where the robber was a black youth, on a lighter skinned side of the spectrum but not mixed race. The cop said to his partner, showing off his worldly knowledge "Oh, the term she means is 'mulatto'" My mom decided not to take him on just then although she was thinking "nobody uses that term anymore, and even if they did it is the wrong one..."
Cop 2 to cop 1, "Um, how do you spell that?" "Cop 1, impatiently "It's mill...."

I know some people will use the word mulatto but I'm not sure they would use its relatives (quadroon, octoroon) so easily. I doubt they've considered the connections or that it anyone would find it offensive.

btw I'm cross posting this link here, it might interest some. It's a series of vignettes with commentary meant to educate about assumptions and racial mindsets.

http://learningdiversity.com/vigsandcomments.htm
faerietails2
I just wanted to post this article to see what you all thought.
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