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sonik
Stick with the editorial. I used to call the editorial office to ask if i could speak to the art director ( i also did this when it ws not clear who was in charge of the illustrations etc). I simply told him/her i'd like to send work. Then you are sure it will be delivered to the right place. Also, websites of magazines et al are good resources. Most have a 'masthead' section in which you can see who's who.

It's a matter of keeping your ears and eyes open. Magazines change their staff; send new work immediately. There's a thread in Media Whores about Busties' favourite magazines. Maybe there's something in there you like to work for. In a coffeeshop are magazines and papers. You can check the editorial credits and write them down on a blocknote (always good to have with you; you never know what you might find). This way you'll get familiar with names and people who matter in the publishing world. Here in NL we have a site that keeps track of all new magazines. It's a directory of dutch magazines, and i stumbled on it by accident. Maybe there's somthing like that in your region too.

I read that some directories cost about $3000!! Man, then you have to be really sure there's gold in there! I once bought a cd-rom with all kinds of subsidies and stuff on it. Turned out that some links didn't work, and the info was out of date FAST. Ok, the cost was about $50, but i wouldn'do that again.

Maybe this site can be of help:http://www.yaytime.com/guide_freelance.html
I got it from Drawn.ca, which is great resource when it comes to illustration.
Muffy
sonik, what a helpful link, I found it interesting. I've been trying to make some extra cash freelancing (design and/or illustration)... as of yet I haven't but not from lack of trying.

I now know to ask for cash up front after doing design and illustration work for a business in RI and not being paid for it. yeah sure its a nice portfolio piece. That would be my advice for everyone, ask for at least half up front or at least get a written, not verbal contract, unless you have a tape recorder.
nickclick
as a photo editor for a educational book publisher, i can say i still love getting the postcards from photographers and illustrators. i just drop them in a file and break them out after design meetings to see if anyone fits what we're planning. i have a list of websites too, but call me old-fashioned; i love to spread out those small pieces of artwork on a table. as an art person i guess i need that 'gallery' view! and the coolest cards are tacked up to my bulletin board, in front of my face all day.

but please no calls! as a small publisher, most art-related mail gets directed over to me. at a larger publisher tho, i don't know if they'd bother. best to just call the main # and ask for the art contact name.
sassysarahart
I'm graduating from university with a fine arts degree this year and I have no idea what I want to do when I'm done. I also went to college for graphic design, but I'm not so much a fan of sitting in front of a computer being a robot. I worked as a designer for two years before I went back to school again. I didn't feel like I was able to be creative enough while working as designer.

Anyone have some advice or suggestions for a fellow artist?
nickclick
sassysara, i also left college with my BFA all like.... 'wha?' what is your emphasis, if any?

most of my fellow grads (me too) are doing less-than-dream jobs that are still somewhat creative, or at least let us hang with other creative types, but most importanly pay the bills and budget extra money for personal creative pursuits.

in other words, if your 9-5 design cubicle job is boring, at least you're not working at an accounting office, you get a paycheck, and at 5:30 you can paint!
mouse
i'm a lil late on this, smarttart, but meg hunt (http://www.meghunt.com) sells a list of all the contacts she's compiled for i believe around $20. she's a fantastic illustrator and she's done work for excellent magazines with excellent illustration taste, so i imagine that list is gold.
smarttart
Thanks Mouse!

I'll check it out. I just went to Borders on Saturday and got bunches of contacts!
likeanyother
I have a general question about the graphic design industry for those in the know and willing to help: How much does a degree matter?

I ask because I have a degree in Anthropology, obviously very much unrelated to GD. However, I learned a lot of the software on my own and have always been artistically inclined, which landed me a graphics assistant/proofreader position, and then a "promotion" of sorts to a temporary full-time designer job. The woman I was temping for has returned, and now I'm jobless but really want to pursue the field, as I really enjoy the work and have some (though comparably minor) experience. Since I already have a B.A. I was considering going to Grad school for an M.F.A., but I'm pretty conflicted. I already have a ton of debt from my undergrad and I'm just not sure if it's worth getting into a whole lot more debt for a degree that I might not even need. I've read that a good portfolio is all that really matters, but I don't know, my academic leanings want me to go to school just to make me that much more 'qualified.' Any suggestions/opinions?
nickclick
likeanyother, i have a friend who has an english bachelor's and works as a graphic designer. well, page layout and ad design for a group of trade magazines. not the most exciting stuff but my point is..... she started at a crappy local paper doing the same (where i also used to work, bleh), and took a couple of beginner college-level graphic design classes as a non-matric. even though she was 'learning' programs and stuff that she's already used, it may have proved useful on her resume.

so my suggestion is, put together a great portfolio and apply to jobs. and in the meantime, consider a graphic design undergrad class or two. i guess a degree is most desirable, but if money is a factor, then give it a try without the degree. in fact, i'm not sure how easy it is to get into an MFA program without a BFA.
smarttart
At the art school I graduated from they had what they called a "post baccalaureate" program. I believe it was a year long program. The awesome thing about the program is that you get to be exposed to great design, great teachers and great connections. And I don't think it mattered what your undergrad degree was. Or, most art schools have night classes too.
Muffy
likeanyother, I agree with nickclick. I have a degree in graphic design and right now I work retail. Not that I'm trying to discourage you in any way. If money is a big issue in going back to school, defintely start off taking a few classes here and there because not all design jobs pay well so its not like you might be able to pay off school with your pay. though if you eventually can that would be awesome! My experience has been that design jobs that are in an art department at a non-art related business don't pay well at all. Maybe try to pick up some freelance jobs, but make sure to get paid upfront before doing it if your doing it from home. There are alot of freelance opportunities where you can build a portfolio and actual work looks really impressive to potential employers. Also, if you know people in your community that need logos for their business or bands that need cd designs, ect. that's another good way to build your portfolio.
likeanyother
Extremely helpful, thank you. I'm planning on moving to Chicago next summer and I'm sure there will be plenty more job opportunities there than where I am now, ole' hand state. I can spend between now and then working my new semi-crappy temp job and getting better at the software and stuff. It is much smarter to test out the job market before I decide whether or not to go back to school. I think part of me was just looking for an excuse because I like school, I know how to do school, it feels sort of safer than the 'real world.' And part of it was probably just the perception, the 'status' of having a master's degree, or whatever. But that's stupid and it's not the right reason to go, especially with my financial situation. Anyway, thanks again.
nickclick
smarttart, post-bach, huh? i always thought that was just for teacher certification. i'm gonna look into that and the schools in my area! i agree, likeanyother, i love school and wish i could just spend my life learning.
mouse
likeanyother--i second what everyone else has said, and it's really true, your education doesn't matter as much as your portfolio. i'm a fulltime graphic designer and though i have an art degree, one of the best designers i work with has an english degree and taught high school until he got this job. he just knew the software and has a great eye. if you're a great designer but you don't have a degree, you still have a leg up on a bad designer with a degree wink.gif

muffy's suggestion of doing freelance to build a portfolio is a good one, but it can be frustrating, especially because a lot of people want to pay *WAY* under what you're worth and make a billion revisions and generally be uneducated pains in the ass who help lower every other designer's value by taking advantage of amateurs and students BUT that is a rant for another day. however, unless you're real good at brainstorming your own "fake" projects, it's hard to get the experience. like muffy said, MAKE SURE you get paid at least half up front (this is standard industry practice, and if anyone tells you otherwise, they don't know shit and will DEFINITELY screw you over, so run away!) and DRAW UP A CONTRACT! also, maybe take a class or two at a community college? it would get you some show pieces while giving you some hard evidence to show about your knowledge of the programs.

i think the best thing you can do is educate yourself and look at design sites and magazines all the time so you have all that inspiration in your subconscious, and you get an idea of what's out there and what's popular. some great sites:

http://www.designiskinky.net/
http://www.fecalface.com/SF/
http://ffffound.com/
http://cpluv.com/
http://lightheavyweight.blogspot.com/
http://www.howdesign.com/index.asp
http://motionographer.com/
http://www.designspongeonline.com/
http://crowndozen.com/main/index.shtml

also, good reference tools:
http://www.gag.org/ (graphic artists guild)
http://www.sessions.edu/career_center/desi...lates/index.asp (useful invoice forms, etc, so you look professional)

good luck! and let us know how it goes!
likeanyother
Thank you so much, that is majorly helpful. I will let you all know how things go.....
sassysarahart
QUOTE(nickclick @ Nov 28 2007, 11:13 AM) *
sassysara, i also left college with my BFA all like.... 'wha?' what is your emphasis, if any?

most of my fellow grads (me too) are doing less-than-dream jobs that are still somewhat creative, or at least let us hang with other creative types, but most importanly pay the bills and budget extra money for personal creative pursuits.

in other words, if your 9-5 design cubicle job is boring, at least you're not working at an accounting office, you get a paycheck, and at 5:30 you can paint!


I guess it doesn't really matter as long as I'm surrounded with creative types and I can do my own thing after work. We'll see how this goes when I'm done school. I might end up going back...again. I think I am an aspiring professional student.
sassysarahart
[[Mouse]]

That is so true about being ripped off as a new designer. People do not want to spend the money on designs because they think we just pull them out our butts in seconds and they are done. They do not understand that it takes time to come up with a concept and then do some drafts and finally come up with a few designs for them. And they ALWAYS choose the design you spent the least amount of time on.

I did get really frustrated when I was doing freelance graphics I got the run around all the time. I wouldn't do it again just because I still have a bad taste in my mouth from it. All right I'm done with that rant.

You gave awesome advice though!
truliegifted
Yep, I totally understand. I have an art degree with an emphasis in textiles, but who cares what my emphasis is in. I do marketing for a company in the real estate market! UGH....I've started to get serious about my creating of handbags/accessories and now I've made the exciting commitment to a website. Now, I must sell... or I might be stuck doing marketing for the rest of my life.

I'm stuck, does anyone know of any blogs or killer websites out there to show off my one of kind handbags?

Thanks, you rock!
sassysarahart
QUOTE(truliegifted @ Dec 11 2007, 12:57 PM) *
Yep, I totally understand. I have an art degree with an emphasis in textiles, but who cares what my emphasis is in. I do marketing for a company in the real estate market! UGH....I've started to get serious about my creating of handbags/accessories and now I've made the exciting commitment to a website. Now, I must sell... or I might be stuck doing marketing for the rest of my life.

I'm stuck, does anyone know of any blogs or killer websites out there to show off my one of kind handbags?

Thanks, you rock!


What do these handbags of yours look like? I love purses and such. I might want to buy one and I love supporting the smaller companies... so let me know!


truliegifted
QUOTE(sassysarahart @ Dec 11 2007, 12:37 PM) *
What do these handbags of yours look like? I love purses and such. I might want to buy one and I love supporting the smaller companies... so let me know!


you can check out my website.... www.truliegifted.com
Let me know what you think, im open to all comments.
mouse
trulie, welcome!

your bags are rad. have you tried www.etsy.com? it's a diy crafting collective that anyone can join, they take a very small percentage but you get a huge audience, and people sell really awesome things there and its watched by quite a few design blogs and bigwigs.

you could also try notifying any design or crafty type sites or blogs you like of your work, and if they like it they'll showcase it for you. i love www.designspongeonline.com, and she seems really receptive to people sending her their work. when it comes to self-promotion, you really can't be too pushy as long as you're talking to the right people (ie, bug the editor of a fashion magazine, but don't bug your mom's neighbor). send emails, do postcard mailings, FOLLOW UP! be a squeaky wheel and people will take notice.

plus, your site looks great and really professional already, so that is always something that catches editors' eyes. one suggestion--i'd love to see a section devoted to info about the bags or to you--do you make them all yourself? do you design the fabric? what got you started? etc. etc. etc. i think with something as unique as what you're doing, people like to see the personal angle as well.

anyway, i came in here to sort of toss this idea around and maybe get some feedback--a friend of mine is trying to get me to go in with her and hopefully a couple other people on making some sort of artist collective/studio/gallery/living space together next year. she's inspired in part by this place: www.burgerworldchronicles.com

the idea is to buy or rent a cheap warehouse and fix it up ourselves, and then rent out space for darkrooms, printing studios, etc., while also living there and having a gallery space to have shows and bring in more revenue. i'd imagine we'd keep at least part time "real" jobs until it took off, but does anyone have any experience with this sort of thing? it sounds awesome in theory, but i'm worrying that in practice it might be REALLY hard. do you guys think this is just a pipe dream, or could it actually be done?
nickclick
trulie, great stuff! i especially love the seagrass bags. i am a sucker for anything wicker/basket-y. those look very soft. and i agree with mouse. talk up your emphasis on textile design in college, and any other personal art statements.

mouse, what you describe sounds similar to monroe center in hoboken NJ, just outside NYC. that's part of the success of it, it's accessibility to/from manhattan. so remember, location location location! i went there on one of the open studio days, but also for a self-defense class, so some of the spaces are leased by progressive small businesses too.

good luck. that would be totally exciting, and definitely worth checking into, visiting others, etc.

a couple of days ago i went to a photo industry holiday party and re-connected with a former colleague. she's exhibiting her gorgeous photos, went through the master's program i wish i did, and works as an art director for a bigger company than mine. i felt so jealous and down on myself for like two days. but then i realized she has different talents than mine, and i should only be jealous of her courage and hard work. i have those things but i just need to push myself to use them more.
truliegifted
Thank you for some great ideas! You're right, I need to talk about the uniqueness of each bag and the time and effort I take with each one. Talk about myself as well.

A studio with multiple artists would be great for everyone involved. You should look more into it, it's definitely not a pipe dream. Getting everyone on the same page and up and going will be the hard part, but only because it's the beginning. The beginnning of everything is the hard part. Living and working with a group of people will only benifit you with inspiration to further you. Awesome!

Muffy
mouse, I belong to a co-operative/artist collective/art gallery, we don't have living or studio space however. Though your idea is definitely do-able. Also, its a good crash course in running a business. I'm kind of glad there are other people involved in the cooperative other than just me. I've always wanted to have my own gallery or at least be a curator though I know its a LOT of work even when others are involved.

I'm actually in the process of curating a juried erotic art exhibit for the co-operative. one would think finding a prominent person in the RI/MA art's scene would be an easy thing to do. It took me months to get a juror! It was alot of phone/email tag with one RI organization that I asked to help me...whew. by the way getting artists to bring work to exhibit is also a feet in itself (this isn't the first exhibit I've curated). someone says art exhibit and I'm there I don't understand why all the artists seem to procrastinate so much!

truliegifted, your stuff is gorgeous it makes me wish I weren't a starving artist so I could afford nice things.
sassysarahart
Nice work truliegifted! Muffy I was looking at your webpage and your work in phenomenal, I love your style!
truliegifted
QUOTE(sassysarahart @ Dec 25 2007, 06:53 PM) *
Nice work truliegifted! Muffy I was looking at your webpage and your work in phenomenal, I love your style!

Thank youz! When I make some updates I will definitely share with them ya'll.
Happy Holidays! Happy New Year
Muffy
sassysarahart, thanks smile.gif

happy new year art busties!
truliegifted
Happy New Years Ladies!!!
Heres to 2008! I'm working on my 2008 Spring handbags right now. I'm totally excited and I cant wait to show you some pics. I managed to get up my blog at http://truliegifted.blogspot.com/

Ciao bella
Muffy
I'm curating an erotic art exhibit at a co-op gallery. The jurors came to the gallery yesterday I couldn't make it so the gallery director and the gallery president were there. I was a bit nervous because there didn't look like we had enough work for the jurors to pick from but I guess more came in thankfully. However, I received an email today from the gallery director saying they chose some great work but, in her opinion, the jurors were "a bit conservative." I wonder why bother agreeing to juror an erotic art exhibit if you are not that open minded when it comes to this sort of thing? Also, while I didn't ask, I am quite certain my work wasn't amongst the 'chosen ones' I've yet to EVER be selected (at any type of gallery) when the jurors chose who goes into the show. My best friend also entered some work that definitely requires an open mind, I don't even think he got in either considering the jurors were conservative in their selection. He's planned a party for after the opening reception because I think maybe he thought his work was going to be chosen. I kind of hope that by some twist of fate the conservative jurors liked his work because who wants to break the bad news to their best friend?! I'm going to the gallery tonight to hang the show and get the list of the rejected artists to contact... sorry just needed to vent.
mouse
i just got some new freelance work for a woman i did some work for last year. i figured i'd never hear from her again, so it's a nice surprise. it's nice to do the work and see how much better i am than last year--how far i've come. and it's also nice to do something that's a bit of a change than my fulltime job (which i've been at for almost a year now!!!)

sometimes i worry that i like my current job so much that it is holding me back. i know that sounds crazy, but as much as i do enjoy my job, it's not *exactly* what i ultimately want to be doing. i work in apparel, but i'd rather be doing print design & illustration, and ideally i'd like to be freelancing full time so that i could work with a variety of clients. however, the job i have *is* one of the most illustrative design jobs one can have (i get do draw and paint away from the computer regularly), i LOVE my coworkers, i get along great with my merchandiser, it more than covers my rent, and everyone seems to think i'm doing well. i worry that i'm getting complacent, though, and that i'm not really learning anymore. but i'm reluctant to leave, since it *is* a really good job. i know it's stupid of me to complain about this, but there is a little nagging voice that keeps going "you're getting soft, you have to be more ambitious!"

does this make sense, or am i looking a gift horse in the mouth? i am REALLY grateful to have gotten the job i have, but i feel like there are other things still for me to work for...

muffy, did your friend's art make it in??? good luck with the show--curating, that's AWESOME!
nickclick
mouse, continue enjoying your job but keep one eye open for another, for your dream job. be patient.
Muffy
mouse, well on the one hand your lucky to have a job that pays rent that you like, on the other, if freelancing is what you really want to do, you should follow your bliss. Though I would make sure you have enough clients and work before making such a leap. If your truly concerned about losing your touch, is there any kind of design associations in your area or even other designers you could form a group with to meet and keep each other motivated, not to mention networking? Its how I stay up with the art scene, I joined a cooperative (that's where the art exhibit is). I don't get paid but I have that network of other local artists and I think its what keeps us all motivated, of course I work retail so I don't really have the same issue as you. Ironically this is the best job I've ever had, I like most of my coworkers and right now I am even able to take a few classes so hopefully I can teach art instead of be a starving artist.

As for the show I am curating, the gallery director scared me when she said the jurors were 'conservative' in their selection, what she actually meant is that they didn't edit much work out. whew. Two of my best friend's pieces got in! I was more thrilled over that than my own getting in. We hung it the other night and I am happy with the work in the show, and there is a lot of work in the show.

This is a link to the gallery site if anyone is in the area of New Bedford, MA: http://www.galleryx.org/
Muffy
oops sorry! posted twice!
sonik
Mouse, i'm with Nick; it sounds like a good job, but be critical about your job as well. I don't really know how i would handle it, but the job i got at the time was a crappy one in retail, so the choice was obvious. Go with your gut, i'd say. It's good to hear you say you can see yourself improving, it's so important to keep up and like evolve when it comes to skills and style. Let us know how things go.

Muffy, that'll look great on your resume, curating an exhibit! And yay for your 2 friends getting work in!

Okay i feel really pompous for saying this, but i'm currently booked until March. I can't believe all the jobs (high end, advertising) coming my way. When all is done you'll probably see it around, it's for U.S. based companies. I love my agent.

Muffy
sonik, that's awesome good luck with all your work biggrin.gif
and the gallery volunteer position is already on my résumé, I've been with them for seven years now (!) though it doesn't feel that long.
sonik
btw Muffy, i tried to send you a xmas card by email, but it bounced...
Muffy
sonik, that's weird, well thanks for trying anyhow.
Muffy
Hi all just want to share with my art busties about the exhibit I'm curating, if your in the New England area you should come on by. Its at Gallery X and it called "Sex at the X" an exhibition of erotic art juried by Nancy Whipple Grinnell, curator at the Newport Art Museum, and Dan Kahn, staff at Rhode Island State Council. The opening reception is this saturday from 7-10pm.
Gallery X is located at 169 William St. New Bedford, MA
and online at: www.galleryx.org
mouse
bumpity bump bump

getting closer to possibly getting a studio (!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!). a friend of a friend owns a gallery near my house that has a warehouse behind it that is opening up for rent--she's trying to get several people in to create a studio space plus small press. SO EXCITED. still in the theory stages but OMG SO EXCITED.
archegonia
hi,

wow, i feel in awe among curators. i'm just a creative cat but maybe i can ask some advice??? i'd like to make uterus sculptures that double as functional bird feeders. i'd like to do so with used plastic bottles (laundry detergent..ect..) or paper mache because i dont want to get to unenvironmentaly friendly and because i'm broke and because i dont know what else to use. does anyone have any advice for weather proofing said methods or a suggestion for a method i dont know about?

thank you! and good luck with that space, mouse.
a
Muffy
mouse, that's awesome! good luck! I'm a little jealous as my 'studio' is my bedroom, at least I can't complain about the commute *shrugs* storage kind of sucks though.

archegonia, I know a guy who does paper mache sculptures, but I think they are primarily for indoor use, it doesn't seem like the medium for outdoor use. What about ceramics? clay is just dirt, can't get anymore environmentally friendly than using dirt. I don't know if glazes are so much environmentally friendly. There are many alternative arts places that may have a kiln you can rent, or if you talk to enough artists you'll find one in your area that has one you can borrow.
dusty
http://www.hopegangloff.com/
mouse
dusty, is this your stuff???
dusty
Oh god, no. I just liked it.
knorl05
so.
i'm wondering if i can bring my thoughts and questions about art into this thread? dont want to disrupt any ongoing flow of convo or tone of communication... but i've been wrestling with some questions about the meaning and purpose to art that my friends arent quite helping me to conclude. mind if i throw some out to get feedback from art busties? hmm?

ps. i also realize this pondering could be put to good use in an educational facility, however, i havent got the resources for that at this time. so bust land is my next best option. wink.gif
Muffy
knorl05, art has many purposes.
Sometimes art serves a function such as in graphic design, architecture, ect. its purpose is obvious, its there for a reason.
Sometimes it functions as a communicator of ideas or aesthetic beauty such as in music, poetry, sculpture. Political art or conceptual art would communicate an idea. Conceptual art (for those who don't know) is art where the idea/concept is more important than the thing your looking at. For Conceptual art see: Christian Boltanski, or Illya Kabakov.
Art is universal, many times it transcends language, like when you listen to a song in a language you don't understand but you still think its a great tune.
Art can also be therapeutic, because it is universal, subjective, and an expression of the artist's ideas, and feelings. Kim Gordon (of Sonic Youth) once said in an interview, that she always feels good about herself after she has created something. I wholeheartedly agree with her statement. Performance, visual, and literary arts kept me out of a lot of trouble as a teenager. I wrote, I danced, I sang, I drew, I painted. It was the reason I went to school, and I know of many artists who say the same thing.

I hope this helped you with your question.
sonik
People tend to see expressions of art/culture/even folklore as something added to society. In fact art defines society, it provides people with an identity rather than the other way around. I'm taling about art in a broad sense here.

(modern) Art is egoistical; i don't make stuff to educate the world, nor does it carry a clear message.

Granted, the stuff i make has a purpose, since i'm in the illustration business, the ability to communicate is pivotal in illustration. But even then, i never surrender to routine, something makes one tick, personal fascinations and interests always find their way out.

Anyway, i'll stop here before i start rambling. My life is turned upside down, and my head's not screwed on right today.
knorl05
yes, muffy that helped tremendously thank you. i'm what one could call an outsider artist, but i want to be more. i want to understand more and refine my talent. i just hesitate sometimes, wondering, what's the point. even though i seem to need art and creativity in my life.. i wonder, does it even matter. and i guess what i really want to figure out is what does art mean to me? what do i hope to do with art? what do i believe the purpose of art is subjectively, so that i can begin to understand it more objectively (or is it the other way around?). i crave depth and deeper meaning in most things i do, so i figure my art should reflect this. like, what am i trying to say? i just get ..overwhelmed.. with all the possibilities and direction to take and whatnot.

sonik, i really get that.. that modern art is egotistical. i have a lot of creative friends who are artists and musicians but not a whole lot of them convey to me a message or an intent behind their work. you know, they kind of just do it, because it's what they do. and i wonder, why are they doing this? because it feels good? because it looks good? does there even need to be anything more? am i just completely missing the mark? is the purpose and intention behind their work, the work itself? should i stop trying to extract more from things, and just allow them to be and appreciate things for what they are? i guess because there are so many forms of self expression i have learned to be more discerning... i need to filter out that which doesnt speak to me somehow because there is just too much artwork in the world to contemplate. hmm.

think the answer is, whatever i think it is eh? that it's not necessarily for someone else to answer because it's different for each of us? thank you for letting me explore these thoughts and for your input.....smile.gif
sonik
The thing is that when i make something i start out with an idea of what i want to do. But at the same time i don't want to orchestrate the whole thing. It's ok to turn right, even if you intended on turning left in the process. I think it's important to communicate an idea artwise, personally i don't want to read like 10 pages about some artwork. There has to be something in the image that works for me. That sound consumer-like, and that is not exactly what i mean. It's like putting meaning in what you do and letting go at the same time. If people relate to my work in a different way then i meant when i made it that's ok with me. The reactions i get are never far away from wht i tried to communicate.

Like, for instance one of my works was exhibited in a gallery in St. Petersburg, FL. It was a drawing about Queens, NYC. I drew the 7 train and all kinds of stuff i saw when i was there (i also read a lot about cities, realty and the sociological history of cities. I don't want to be in some hip urban slipstream, i'm genuinely interested in that kind of stuff. So i read about it, travel, to see it for myself. That's meaning behind my work right there) There was a potential buyer who felt strongly about the work, since he had lived in NYC and he had taken the 7 line for 15 years to get to work and back. For me, that's the best compliment i can get; that a former Newyorker feels emotionally attracted to this work, made by someone who visited the city shortly.

Knorl05, don't blind yourself with what art should be, i think it cramps your style. Most artists don't think all that hard (although i know some who are really passionate about their work. I think that is what i valor most besides the quality of the art; the drive of people to get things done). Educate yourself, but at the same time you should do what feels good. Dare to fail.

Yesterday i watched 'To live And Die In L.A.' and counterfeiter/artist Willem Dafoe sets his work on fire; his paintings as well as his money printing business. I found the whole process of printing the money artistically more interesting than the paintings. Craft vs. Art.
Muffy
Knorl05, I have to agree with sonik, do it because you want to and for your reasons and don't overthink it.

I always look at my own personal art as an experiment. I may love the sketch, but upon completion of the actual thing, absolutely hate it. I will happily paint over or destroy said piece much to many people's dismay. You have to feel something about it first, who cares if that seems slightly self-centered? I admit it, its about me first, I put a little of myself into all of it. I think people respond to work that I put myself into first: we're all human and many times there is at least one other person who has been in the same situation, place, or had the same feelings, and to see someone put it into a form of art is like one of those "ah ha!" moments.
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