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sassygrrl
Shibooya, I understand too. It's completely changed. I too have a B.A. in English, and all I've ever worked are clerical jobs. I'm feeling the same way too. Yes, I probably need to get a MA to move on in a career, but it's going to be a lot of money. Also, Mcgeek is considering a Ph.D. That just means to me that we'll be very very broke.

Syb, I'm actually looking into archivist work. The pay is crap, but it seems interesting. I just don't know how often jobs come up in it. I have to do more research, and study more for the damn GRE.

angie_21
Hey Shibooya, I just got my MA last year and I don't know if what I have to say will make you feel better of not. My degree is also highly undervalued (anthropology.. hmm, what's that, you ask? no one knows and no one cares!) and it took me a long time to get a job (half a year, but still nothing permanent) because I had to wait for things to come up in my field. Outside of other archaeologists and anthropologists, I'm definitely seen as useless, no matter how stunning my academic resume might look. I'm not actually qualified to run a photocopier, even though I have plenty of actual experience doing boring office stuff. However, the jobs I do get are pretty freakin awesome in terms of personal fulfillment, so it makes up for all the ego-bashing I get while applying for things outside of my degree. I don't know a lot about English degrees and career paths, but is there anything you can apply for that's closer to your studies? If you get an MA, you can teach as a sessional (really, really bad pay, but more fun!) Searching for jobs more relevant to your degree takes time, sometimes years, but in the meantime, you have a job to tide you over until then!

As for deciding to go for an MA... think hard. Don't just continue in the same field because you don't know what else to do. there are a lot of cool things you can take at community college that only take a year or two, if you want to escape the academic hampster wheel and learn welding, graphic design, cooking, whatever else that would get you away from working at a desk your whole life.

Wish I'd take my own freakin advice. oh well.

Sassy, an archivist position just came up where I live, but I think it closed already so I can't send the posting to you. it's the only one I've ever seen in 8 months of job hunting, but if you are also thinking of broadening your studies to history, museums, or collections management, there are quite a few things out there, and the pay is moderate. The better paying jobs will be posted on government job boards, and will require lots of experience. These are canadian websites (pay is in Canadian $$ too), and there's a lot of cross posting between these, but here's an idea of the lower-paying end of the spectrum:
Candian Heritage Information Network
Canadian Museums Association
kari
I feel your pain. It is frustrating how you have to have a graduate degree these days. sad.gif

I think a good idea is to identify jobs you think you'd like, or career areas, and then see what's required for them. Work backwards, rather than looking at the degree programs first.

I wish I had done that.
likeanyother
Hi ladies, I posted in here a bit ago and I was just wondering how everyone's life pursuits are going....? Right now I'm in Taipei, Taiwan teaching english to kids. It's not anything I ever thought I'd do but I had to get away from the same town, same shit job, same day everyday life and do something different. I'm really glad I'm having this experience, but I know it's not something I'd want to continue to do, and my plan has always been to go to grad school after my year contract is up (next July). Which brings me to applying to grad schools, which I have to do like very soon, yet I'm still very conflicted about where I want to go and the big one -- what the hell I want to do!

angie_21, your MA is in Anthropology? That's what my bachelor's is in. I've always heard it's sort of pointless to pursue it any further unless I'm going all the way and getting a PhD, then fieldwork, then teaching, and I just really can't see myself going that far. I've never wanted to be a professor and I still don't. What is your area of specialization? What types of jobs are you applying for? I'm curious as I'm considering going to grad school for Primatology and then trying to get work in the field. However it's not exactly a booming business and I'm really scared of getting one more degree that costs and bunch of money and leaves me unemployed. I'm also still interested in Library Science and/or Design/Technology, but I'm also extremely adverse to sitting at a desk from 9 to 5 all day, so I just don't know what to do! Ugh. Anybody figure anything out? Have any words of wisdom to offer?
angie_21
I don't know why my answer is so long. I guess because I'm pretty lost right now myself. So my advice is probably horrible. But here are my thoughts anyways...

QUOTE(likeanyother @ Aug 2 2009, 06:38 AM) *
angie_21, your MA is in Anthropology? That's what my bachelor's is in. I've always heard it's sort of pointless to pursue it any further unless I'm going all the way and getting a PhD, then fieldwork, then teaching, and I just really can't see myself going that far. I've never wanted to be a professor and I still don't. What is your area of specialization? What types of jobs are you applying for? I'm curious as I'm considering going to grad school for Primatology and then trying to get work in the field. However it's not exactly a booming business and I'm really scared of getting one more degree that costs and bunch of money and leaves me unemployed. I'm also still interested in Library Science and/or Design/Technology, but I'm also extremely adverse to sitting at a desk from 9 to 5 all day, so I just don't know what to do! Ugh. Anybody figure anything out? Have any words of wisdom to offer?


It's not exactly pointless getting an MA or PhD degree in Anthro, but it does make life more difficult. I don't know if I can offer any wisdom, but... sit down. think really, really hard, and ask yourself, how much do I care about money? Do I need job security? If not now, how will I feel 5 or 10 years from now? If you think at some point you will really really want a secure income and a stable lifestyle, don't rule out a 9 to 5 office job. It's hard to have both freedom and security. But also, you don't need to have that job now, just be prepared that you may need to build some skills in that direction for the future.

Turns out, I've given up stability for fun (and stress), but I'm happy that way. Even if I regret it every other day. I also really hate the idea of sitting at a desk all day, but I don't always escape it. And I haven't decided yet whether I want to go all the way to a PhD or not. I can say that if you really don't want a 9 to 5 office job, you'll be OK ith studying what really interested in. I would say it's the better choice to study what you want, but I don't know if I believe it anymore. If I had known things would be this wierd back when I started down this path in undergrad, I know I would have made a lot of different decisions.

My degree is in archaeology, so I don't know if my advice applies, but one of the girls in my class did get a job as a research assistant studying some kind of primate locomotion, with just her BA in Anthro. What I can say is if there are at least a few jobs in primatology, you won't be jobless if you are passionate about it and have the smarts and skills to back it up. It may take time, you may have to do shitty contract or part-time work for a while first, but you will find a job. The important thing to do is choose your thesis topic carefully, one that will allow you to meet and impress people who are currently "in" in the field, and who may be able to hire you one day.
likeanyother
Mmmm, ahhhh, those are some really good thoughts angie_21, thank you. Although the "ahhhh" is that they're almost too good in both directions. I actually read your reply yesterday and was thinking all day about what you said about needing stability down the road. That's very true, and it's not necessarily something I've really considered. I'm also on the fence about whether or not I want to have a family, which is pretty relevant when considering whether or not I will need (like really NEED) a stable income in however many years. After considering that, I sort of concluded that security probably will be important to me in the future. I could be happy being a librarian or a designer (my job before I left the U.S.). I think I would like it. But, of course, I can't stop thinking about doing what I would really love, as opposed to just like. What you said about eventually finding the right job if I'm skilled and smart enough is assuring but I also have a lot of self-doubt. Maybe I'm not skilled/smart enough to make it in that field.... I don't know. The best “both ways” advice I've gotten is that if I can't make it as a Primatologist I can always go back to school again and get a second mater's degree..... perhaps that may be my answer.

Anyway, thanks for your words of wisdom, they gave me a lot to consider. I think I'm going to give myself a deadline of a month to just frickin decide already and get off the damn fence.

Positive vibes for you and a successful archaeology career!
angie_21
hey again, I hope my advice didn't completely steer you away from picking the "fun" job. Give yourself as much time as you need to make your decisions. Taking an extra year to decide is better than spending 2 or 3 years studying the wrong thing! I rushed into grad school and for the first semester I cried every day because I thought I had made the wrong decision. As it turns out, I don't think there are any "wrong" decisions (other than becoming a crack-head and.or working at McDonalds the rest of your life lol). I loved my thesis and I am soo glad I didn't switch into Law or Biology like I was thinking at the time! You make things work out, no matter which path you've chosen, and it isn't as hard as people think to change directions.

I wrote what I did about stability because I know a lot of people, I mean a lot, who love their jobs but are pretty profoundly unhappy with the rest of their lives. Being in a career that is uncommon makes it pretty unstable, unless you manage to get one of the few high-end jobs. It's not impossible, or probably even all that hard, but a lot of people give up halfway there because they want to spend more time on their personal lives. But it's a catch-22, because if you don't get one of the nice stable government/academic jobs, then your personal life suffers anyways. When I picked an obscure field like archaeology, I didn't realize these things, and once in a while I really wish for a more secure income, or even just to know what I will be doing 2 months from now! I don't think its the wrong decision at all to pick the "fun" career (I still wish at least once a week that I had had the guts to go into physics and get a job at NASA or the CSA! I have no idea anymore why I decided not to.) but I also know a lot of people who went into anthropology not realizing the consequences further down the road, and it's better if you make an informed decision about it!

And primatology sounds pretty damn cool. wink.gif
angie_21
oh, and don't let self-doubt get in the way. Ever. Even if you aren't top-of-the-class, hard work and schmoozing (when done correctly) goes a long long way. And sometimes all it takes to get the skills or experience you might lack, is some extra work and volunteer time.
sassygrrl
I agree with angie, but self-doubt is hard to get past.

Not much is new with me. I have taken basically a year off. I'm still caught between speech pathology and library science as careers. I actually got a book on "Day in the Life" on librarians. I also plan to volunteer at our local library. I did find that if you're unemployed, they're giving special rates on the GRE if anyone is interested.

Part of me really wishes that I could understand science a little more and become a paleontologist, or just work as a movie critic. I'm grant writing now, and it's seems pretty dry. Maybe it's because I don't have the hang of it yet. It's also not paying the bills either. I just either want a p/t right now (planning wedding and figuring out grad school is basically rough on me, and I need something else to focus on) or figure out what the hell to do. I thought I'd be there by now. I think I'm just getting scared.




I hope everyone is doing okay.

likeanyother
Thanks for the advice, especially for the words about self-doubt. I agree with sassy that it is a hard thing to get past though. However, hearing someone say to never ever let that get in the way is just inspiring enough to force me past it. I think I'm really starting to lean toward going for it. I'm not totally there yet, but I might be if I keep thinking like I am now. I read a letter in the “Since You Asked” advice column on Salon.com from a lady in her 40s, who is feeling bored and unfulfilled by her career in graphic design, which has also helped pushed me toward doing what I really want to. Even if it is a hard road, I think I'm prepared for that, and I think I would regret feeling trapped and bored by my career in 20 years more than I would regret struggling in something I love.
sassygrrl
Still wrestling with such issues of self-doubt and fear. I think it's been due to my crappy employment the last few years. I really need to buckle down and just take the fucking GRE, and get it over with so I can start working on my graduate school apps. I think I'll start volunteer maybe in both fields, and take it from there.


angie_21
Hey sassy, I am procrastinating on grad school apps too! Meaning, I haven't started or even decided if I want to apply. I do think it would be awesome to do research all the time, and have control over it, and travel to beautiful and remote places every summer. But I am not ready to pull up all my roots and just move away for grad school, and them permanently to another University, probably in the States because archaeology in Canada is lame. And then I think, am I really just trying to decide between 2 things I don't really want to do? Or am I only using not wanting to move as an excuse to wimp out of taking the financial and personal plunge of going back to grad school? arrgh, I don't even know the answer to that!

I guess I have to take my own advice and figure out what I really want and just freakin do it. But it really feels like I actually don't know what I want. And it feels like what I want has little to do with my career in a lot of ways, it's more about the friends and family I want to spend time with.
likeanyother
WORD angie! I know exactly what you're saying about feeling like you don't actually know what you want. Or really, that what you do want isn't possible, therefore you must choose to give something up in order to get any portion of what you do want. In your case, you want to be able to stay in Canada, go to grad school, do research, travel to remote field sites in the summer and come back to your friends and family, and have a good job when you're finished. That would be super sweet. I want to be able to go to grad school for primatology and be able to get a job doing conservation work when I'm finished, but not have to move away from my boyfriend (and any possibility of having a family in the future – he's going to get an MFA and teach, so it's not like he can just move anywhere, he has to go where he can find work as well). I know I was all gung-ho for a while there about just going for a life with primates, but now I'm starting to realize that the likelihood of actually finding the kind of job that would make me happy and glad I got an MS in Primatology, is slim. It sucks. I would die if I had to work in a lab and see primates in captivity every day. And of course, there are other paths I can see myself going down that would make me happy and give me a much better chance of actually finding a job and having some stability in income and flexibility as far as where I can live and work. That makes the decision that much more difficult.

My latest little dream/scheme is to open a used bookstore. I was thinking if I got a master's in library science I could first work and save up some money (and have a back-up plan in case the bookstore didn't work out). What do you guys think? Realistic or not?

Sassygrrl, are you applying to any Library Science programs? I'm going to take the GRE in November and start applying places in December/January (where? not entirely sure yet....). It'll be great to hear how you all's decision-making and application processes go as well.
neverending
It seems everyone here is talking about College. I realize now that college is not for me. I rather open my own business or something like that. I don't like to work and I don't want to work unless it is for myself. I've always liked to do my own thing. So, having my own business or a family type business is my best bet. I watch people who come from oversees open family business's and they can leave when they want, go on vacations, and do whatever they please when they feel like it. Seems like a good idea. All I have to do is think of what type of business. probably, a pet daycare or something. smile.gif
angie_21
QUOTE(neverending @ Aug 27 2009, 10:45 PM) *
I watch people who come from oversees open family business's and they can leave when they want, go on vacations, and do whatever they please when they feel like it.


Really? Good for them! Most of the people I know who own or run small businesses are tied to their business 24/7, they can't go to the grocery store without a laptop and cellphone to manage emergencies. I know I would hate it, I'm not capitalist-minded and I don't have a strong drive in customer service. But you know, pet daycares and petsitters are definitely in high demand where I live, we literally can't hire someone to drop in and give my cat her medication while we are on vacation. And that would be a pretty fun way to make a living.

In the end, I think I did make the right decision, career-wise. I get to solve problems and work on interesting things, and I am not working to help make someone a profit, I'm working to further human knowledge. woohoo!at the end of the day, I usually get to go home and relax. The internship I just got is awesome, I'm working for the Museums department at the University I graduated from. Last week I got to check out the clothing and textiles collection (including shoes and hats from the 1700's and $10 000 kimonos!) and a rare art collection from China. I'll always be wishing for more stability, and until the economy improves it's pretty hopeless to even dream of getting a full-time permanent job, but hopefully it will happen one day. At least now I will have experience in a "museum setting"

jury's still out on school. I haven't worked on any applications yet but I still have a few months. arrgh. I still dream of being a novelist.

likeanyother, are there any successful bookstores where you're at? Maybe you could check them out, work at one part-time, see how they run.
likeanyother
QUOTE(angie_21 @ Aug 30 2009, 09:01 PM) *
likeanyother, are there any successful bookstores where you're at? Maybe you could check them out, work at one part-time, see how they run.


Right now I'm living in Taipei, Taiwan, so that would be a yes, but none that I can work at considering my poor Chinese language skills (right now I'm working pretty much the only job I'm qualified for in my situation, which is teaching English, natch wink.gif ). Working at a bookstore is a good thing to consider doing when I get back to the states though. I'm about 80% sure I'm going to grad school for Library Science, that way I can get a job that is working toward the greater good, with the key words being that I can actually 'get a job', something that there's just too much uncertainty about in Primatology.

I actually feel pretty excited about my choice since I absolutely love reading and being a book nerd. And through being a teacher here I'm finding I really like helping people learn, so I feel myself naturally going in the L.S. direction. The bookstore thing is definitely a big dream for the future type thing that I'm definitely going to maintain, both because it's just damn fun to have a big dream and because I have really really always wanted to work for myself and I think I could make it happen if the stars align to make it realistically achievable.

neverending, I agree that working for yourself and doing your own thing is just so appealing. I think angie is right though, that it takes a lot of hard work to get to the point that you can just leave and go on vacation whenever you want and have someone else that you trust to run all aspects of your business. It can happen, but you have to invest a lot of time in effort and money it before you get there. Good luck though! A pet care business does sound like a really good idea, I'm curious to hear how your venture goes.
angie_21
I didn't think of this before, neverending, but I want to say, it's great that you already know you don't want to go to college. I know so many people who went and then after spending a ton of time and money, realized they were doing the wrong thing. It's such a huge investment these days, and unless you go into medicine, law, or business, there's not much of a payoff at the end, at least not financially. Most of what I got out of university was the personal fulfillment from learning and doing new and interesting things. If you don't think you'd get that, it probably is wiser to take a few courses in financial planning and business management, or get certification in a trade, or try for the home business.

I was realizing last week that if I had married rich, I could be lying beside a pool in California right now. Unfortunately, my parents taught me "useful" life skills that scare away the rich stupid men. Bah.
rogue
Does anyone have any advice regarding going to school full time and working full time as well? I know it's been done before but I'm just wondering if anyone here has any experience actually doing it?

The reason I am asking is because I really want to go back to school to become a paramedic. I have a university degree already and I work at a pretty prominent office in my city as the receptionist/office assistant but with my degree (Bachelor of Arts, History) it's just about the only thing I can find. And even though I love the people I work with, the job is pretty decent with amazing benefits and health care and everything, it's just not what I want to do for the rest of my life.

Here's the catch, I guess. My father and stepmother have offered to pay for my paramedicine course, which is only a year long, but I think the stipulation is that I have to do it in their province. I can take the course here in my city without moving as well, which I would rather do because honestly, I am in a really good place in my life right now and I don't feel like moving again (especially back to their home because it's really hard to live with my stepmother at times). I haven't really discussed it with them about paying for my course here, but if I did do that I would still need to pay rent and get groceries, you know; things for basic survivial and therefore would need a full time job as well. When I was in uni I went to school full time and worked part time so it was doable and one semester I even juggled two jobs so it was like full time but it was easier to work a uni schedule out around work than it will be to work a professional school around work because the hours are more standard (I'm expecting a nine-to-three or a nine-to-four schedule).

I don't know, I guess I'm rambling, but if anyone has any advice it would be greatly appreciated! This wouldn't be happening until next September but I'm a girl that likes to plan ahead. =)
rogue
QUOTE(angie_21 @ Sep 2 2009, 09:53 PM) *
I didn't think of this before, neverending, but I want to say, it's great that you already know you don't want to go to college. I know so many people who went and then after spending a ton of time and money, realized they were doing the wrong thing. It's such a huge investment these days, and unless you go into medicine, law, or business, there's not much of a payoff at the end, at least not financially. Most of what I got out of university was the personal fulfillment from learning and doing new and interesting things. If you don't think you'd get that, it probably is wiser to take a few courses in financial planning and business management, or get certification in a trade, or try for the home business.

I was realizing last week that if I had married rich, I could be lying beside a pool in California right now. Unfortunately, my parents taught me "useful" life skills that scare away the rich stupid men. Bah.


Oh and angie, I really agree with everything you've just said here. I've always said the same thing about university - unless you are going to be something in medicine, law or business, it's probably not the best idea. I know it wasn't for me, at least, hence wanting to go back and do something more "trade"-like, even though paramedicine isn't a trade, per se.
angie_21
Hi rogue. I worked part time during both my degrees, and usually found it pretty alright, sometimes even fun. It helpe dme keep perspecitve on my studies. Full time though - you would have to really want it. I moved back home at the beginning of my MA and yeah, um, I totally understand! Being back home was so much harder than anything I did at school or work! I think you could creatively manage your time, some of my friends have done things like apply for sabatticals, arrange with their profs to do extra credit assignments at home to make up for missed class time, negotiate working 80% time instead of full hours, things like that. And since it's only a year, maybe you could take a month off work near the end of the course to give yourself extra time for exams? Or apply for student loans, or if you can, borrow money from the parents just to cover groceries... I bet if they are willing to support you at home, they would be willing to give at least a little support while you are away, too!
likeanyother
rogue, I did it for one semester in college (the rest of the time I worked part time) and my biggest advice is to NOT work 3rd shift like I did. I would work all night and then have to go to school all day, and 5 out of 7 days I would then go home to sleep for 4 hours, get up, go back to work and do it all again. It sucked, bad. Working part time while you go to school is do-able, working full time is rough. One thing that helped a little was that I made sure I did my homework at school in the library, either on my breaks between classes or staying after I was done. That way what little time I had at home was fully my own, to do house shit or just frickin relax once in a while.

I agree with angie though, ask them about helping you out where you are? I don't really understand why they would expect you to do it where they are. Explain to them your reasoning for wanting to do the course where you're settled and see what they say! Good luck.
rogue
Hi Ladies - thanks so much for your advice. I do want to talk to them about helping me out while I'm here, my family is just very strange. Long story short, it's my stepmother who would basically be paying for the course and I think she is using the money as an incentive to get me over there. She always tells me how much my Dad wants me to be there closer to him but the thing is, he left my mother and me for her when I was four so I kind of don't deal well with that statement. He could have been closer to me if he had decided to be honorable and not have an affair. I love my Dad and we're all good now but I think you can understand how that just rubs me the wrong way. I kind of think that if I ask them about helping me out here she will deny it.

I have been thinking about applying for another student loan but I think it might get denied. I have an okay job now but the pay is really bad so I haven't put a cent (other than my yearly income tax returns) on my loans in years so I don't know if they will give me another one. The sad thing is, if I actually do get to go back to school to be a paramedic I would make twice the amount I am making now and would be able to pay them back no problem, so I think they would be stupid not to loan me another $6000 for the course. With a student loan, a part-time job, and the money from my Dad and stepmom I think I would be okay for rent and stuff, and for keeping up my studies here in my home province (where my Mom and I live) as opposed to going there to live with them.

Seriously, it's more of a story for the dysfunctional family thread but it's next to impossible to spend an extended amount of time with my family there. Horrible.

I'm going to see what I can figure out. I know that going to school all day and then working all night would be an awful idea so I'm trying to work my way around it. Thanks again for the advice and kind words! It helps!
angie_21
rogue, I have a sweet and loving and vageuly stable family and I was pulling my hair out for the year I moved back home. There's really no explanation needed. (although if you want to talk I'm sure you can vent about it in the family problems thread!) I don't think there's anything that could get me back home now. It is something to think about, to save money and frustration in the long run, but that's your own personal choice.

So you think they won't even lend you the money unless you come home? hmm. How big is you place? Do you think you could get a roommate temporariliy to help pay rent?

Another thing I can advise is to try to be failry certain you will have the money to finish the whole year, before starting the program. My boyfriend was working and studying at the same time, ran out of money, and had to go back to work more than full time. He ended up basically dropping school for a few years while getting back on his feet, before he finally finished the program. And paid extra tuition in the meantime because of it. I'm not saying that will happen, just that its better to be prepared beforehand than have to try to figure out what to do halfway through the school term!
MadameHooch
Hi Ladies!
I haven't been lounge-lurking in like two weeks...life has me stressed! I've been working on a scholarship essay for this study abroad program I really hope I can go to in Quebec. I'll be living with a francophone family and learning all sorts of new and exciting French vocab - however I am SO SICK of my family's negative attitude towards my choice to do this. It's so annoying how people try to butt in to your life and make your decisions sometimes...even more annoying is the NEGATIVE ENERGY they keep putting on me with their bad attitudes...no one is asking them to major in French! For any ladies out there who are feeling frustrated bc their family and friends are telling them their dreams and desires for the future are useless, stay strong and remember it's your life and your passions are NOT useless if they are important to you! I'm right there with you guys..screw the haters!
vermilionkiss
QUOTE(neverending @ Aug 27 2009, 11:45 PM) *
It seems everyone here is talking about College. I realize now that college is not for me. I rather open my own business or something like that. I don't like to work and I don't want to work unless it is for myself. I've always liked to do my own thing. So, having my own business or a family type business is my best bet. I watch people who come from oversees open family business's and they can leave when they want, go on vacations, and do whatever they please when they feel like it. Seems like a good idea. All I have to do is think of what type of business. probably, a pet daycare or something. smile.gif


Neverending... I had the same idea as you 17 years ago. I ended up finding a business partner and opening my own retail gallery/frame shop at 19/20 years old. $50,000 SBA backed loan with barely a penny to my name. I still don't know how I was able to pull that off! It was hard work, but a great life expirience. I will say, having a little busines education would have helped me a lot in the long run. I had to learn everything from scratch, business accounting, marketing, inventory management.. all of it. AND, I had to learn it at my own expense or at the expense of my gallery. I don't think that you have to go out and get a BA to be successful, but understanding the basics of business before you start would be helpful. There are a lot of alternative ways to learn though. If you are driven and creative, you can find them.
sassygrrl
Hi, been lurking. I came across when I sick with a bad cold a course about libraries. It happened to be on the web. I started watching it, and became very passionate. I found out thru a local community college they have a certificate in library technicians. Well, it's not a librarian yet, but it would be a first step. I'm in contact with the college about entry tests(I've got a B.A. already, so I'm not sure if I need them), and we'll see were it goes from there. It would only be 18 hours or so, and I figure I can finish that in a few semesters. Also, Mcgeek could just drop me off at class on the way to work. Cross parts.

How is everyone?

Update: I'm not quite sure. I did some research on library techs (even wrote to the guy that did the course), and he said not to do it. The fact is right now I'm going a little stir crazy trying to figure out the next career move.
SHIT.
angie_21
Hi Sassy - do you mean 18 hours as in 6 courses? If you did it full time you could finish it very quickly. But if that's what you're interested in, and you alredy have a BA, I would recommend just going for library studies, I don't know what kind of degree you need to be a full librarian, but you could probably finish an after-degree in less than 2 years, too, and have way more choices for jobs once you are finished. An MA can also be done in 2 years.

I just got offered an interesting grad school opportunity, it's a long an convoluted story (but once again, connections are everything.. and sometimes the connections your connections have can be just weird), but some of the people from my MA program are telling me its a bad idea, others that it's the best thing ever. I am pretty sure I want it (was more excited before the naysaysers showed up and made me feel confused and guilty), but I am going for it either way. Due to politics among academics, I know I will now be hurting people's feelings now no matter which decision I make and whose advice I follow. Why are people 30 years older than me, with 30 more years of career experience, so damn immature?!
sassygrrl
Hi Angie, it would be 10 courses. I'm going to write some colleges that focus on library science (you need a masters in it), and see what they think. I'm not sure if it would get me anywhere, but there is an internship. This one guy at Syracuse said to not to do it. However, I'm getting serious cabin fever, and there would be some interesting courses. It would also be a preview. I still don't know if I would love this or hate it. I could also study for the GRE. I'm still considering doing distance learning, but I really want to move out west. University of Washington is supposed to have a great program, but Syracuse does as well. There's only one school in GA, and it's near Florida. I'll do more research. I'm just feeling very confused right now. dry.gif Mcgeek is being very supportive which is great.

Good for you to sticking with your guns!

((everyone)))


sassygrrl
I don't know. I am emailing a few professors to ask their professional opinions. On one hand, I don't want to waste money. On the other, I miss school and am bored listless in the house alone. I don't want a job right now, and I'm sick of volunteering. I do need an MLIS for graduate school which would take me about 2 years. The certificate would be about 2 semesters. The only reason I'm really considering it is due to the internship at the end. There's also the possibility that I may completely HATE the field, and I would know now instead of later. I know so many people that entered into grad school wanting to do one field, and then dreading it when they got out of school. I don't want to be one of those people. Also, the school itself hasn't gotten back to me. I realize it's a community college, but jeebus!

PMS isn't helping this much!!!

Angie, how is the grad school opportunity going?

((everybody)))

angie_21
I know its easy to be intimidated by how long it takes to finish a degree, but remember it doesn't sem so bad once you've started. but then again I'm considering a degree at a school where students on average take 7 years to finish! SEVEN YEARS. it seems so long. I'm writing away at a grant application to help pay for it, we'll see how it goes. So much politics, but I tell myself, I can't give up on an opportunity to study with some of the biggest names out there, just because I'm scared. I am scared though, I don't want to step on toes but it will be inevitable, and that's not good for someone just starting out in their career. At least I will have the big names on my side... but... argh! I am all hyped up and frustrated!

sassy, I wish I could help more. If you have time, wait for the profs to get back to you. Have you headed down to the library and asked to talk to any librarians? do you have a university of college library nearby that you can check out? I would also recommend asking profs in the master's program what they think of the certificate (or is that who you contacted already?). for isnstance, would any of the coursework be transferrable to the MLIS? Would good grades from that certificate help when applying to the grad program, or would they count since it's a different type of post-secondary program?
MadameHooch
I've been thinking about putting school off for a while because I can't come to any decisions and getting certified to teach yoga in the meantime. Only catch: I would have to take out another loan and I'm trying to get OUT of debt, not in to even more. I guess in a way it would pay its self off because I would have employment as soon as I'm done with the program, but I'm just nervous about getting in a never-ending tunnel of debt.
epinephrine
*Big, long, melodramatic sigh*

I'm so fed up with this. I hate that I spend weeks looking for a job, hating every minute of it, and I'm finally rewarded with a job I didn't even want and I don't even like because I just don't know what the hell else to do. I'm trapped in menial, entry-level jobs and I'm miserable. I'm in school working on my BA, and I just did my second day on my new job in a grocery store and I feel so hopeless. I just don't have a clue what kind of jobs there are for someone like me. My plan is ultimately to finish my BA and fuck off to the other side of the world to teach English until I can visualize the next step in my life. It's an ok plan - lots of people do it, and teaching English can be good money. But in the meantime, I'm so unhappy with these goddamn meaningless jobs. I'm tired of being either bored or stressed, and that's really all these jobs have to offer.

Ugh...sorry, job training angst, I guess. Hopefully it gets better or I come up with an alternative. I just don't have a clue where to look for something a step up.
angie_21
hey epi, I know how you feel. I worked through my BA in food services, and at first it really sucked, but after a while I got to know my coworkers, and they were awesome, and by the time I graduated and quit that job I really missed it. Sure menial jobs can be boring and stressful, and sure I bet you could contribute so much more to much more useful jobs... But, for now, just savour having a job that you never have to take home at the end of the day, where everything you do is simple and straightforward and do-able and there's few responsibilities... if you're going for a BA, that means most jobs you will have for the rest of your life will be the opposite of all that. Don't get me wrong, they'll be more fun and more challenging, but there's a good side and a bad side to everything.
likeanyother
epi -- I'm in Taiwan now teaching English and I have to say, I couldn't recommend it more, especially if you're at an in-between, not-sure-what-I-want-to-do-with-my-life stage. That's exactly where I was when I decided to come here, except rather than doing it right after I graduated I suffered though a bunch of low paying, temporary, and crappy desk jobs.

While I'm teaching here I'm saving money so that I can travel around Asia for a few months after I'm done and then I'm planning on going to grad school back in the U.S. To save money to bring with me here, I had to work at a job I couldn't stand for about a year, but knowing that I had living and working abroad and then traveling to look forward to really helped me get through it. So think about your sweet future in Asia and maybe that will help a little. Do you know which country you plan to teach in? The money is in Korea, so if that's your goal you should go there. You can also save in Taiwan, though not as much cuz they don't pay your airfare or your housing here, but from what I've heard it's a much nicer country for foreigners to live in. I can vouch for the fact that Taipei is fucking awesome, while Korea has a reputation for being xenophobic, but then again I know someone who taught in Seoul and loved it, so to each their own. Anyway, if you're curious about Taiwan, let me know and I can give you the lowdown. Good luck.
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