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girltrouble
the one that i mentioned that comes across as everyone's favorite crazy aunt, i think is actually very sweet, and not very hateful. but no, in the same way that burlesque can be used to comment on feminine/gender rolls, so can drag, and one doesn't need to be an anti to do it. after all one can be attractive and smart, they aren't mutually exclusive. that said, there is a huge emphasis on beauty/sexuality for transwomen. quite honestly i have a ambiguous feeling towards the constant sexualization of t-girls. i know a lot of t-girls hate it, the jerry springer wave years back. my feeling is that is how these things start. this is my theory of the cultural assimilation of a minority other. it is what happens with all minorities. first the repellant alien stage, then it progresses to curiosity, then fetish/sex object, then, when that other becomes visible enough, the other is villified, and cast as villians, tricksters, then neutral, then friends, then as people. the first part of it is never really desirable, but in order for society at large, they need to go thru those steps to feel comfortable with someone that is "different." so while it might not be all that enjoyable to see nothing but sexualized images, if we take a broad view, visibility is raised, and the journey to being viewed by society slowly moves forward. but that is my theory. some people hate it, and i understand why. but my point isn't to say it's good. it's just that those are the steps as i see them. feel free to pick the theory apart. all theories should be tested to see if they hold water. wink.gif
koffeewitch
GT- That's really intriguing; I like the idea of different stages that seem to serve conflicting purposes, sometimes demonizing a given minority population and sometimes romanticizing aspects of them. I'll have to think that over for a few days and apply it to our populations that have gained more acceptance in the last 30 years or so to practice identifying the different stages you described.

BTW, I noticed several of you mentioning having anthropology majors in college (I also started out as an anthro major). I remember being furious over the male bias in interpretting primate behavior. I remember a big deal being made out of the "prostitution" theory. (I wish I remembered if this occured in orangotans or chimps, etc). Anyway, a scientist observed a male and female primate finding the same piece of food. The primates had sex, and the female took the food. This was interpretted as her bartering with sex/prostituting herself. Now wait a minute, here. IF the male had taken the food first after sex, we all know that it would be interpretted as him displaying dominance over her. Fucking her. He wouldn't be whoring himself for her pleasure he'd be showing her who's boss. And these people call themselves impartial scientists?
angie_21
wow, I can't keep up with everything here! awesome.

I found in most of my history classes that Candian history was portrayed as collective in terms of gender. Everyone was a part of it, or at least, everyone European was. Our courses didn't focus on the names of leaders so much as movements and events that whole gorups of people, male and female, were involved in. A much better reflection of reality, I think. When we moved to European history, well, I was lucky to have an awesome teacher who actually cared about what he was teaching us about. We learned about the men and women of the french revolution, male and female monarchs, and the importance of women during the world wars. Other than suffrage and feminism, gender didn't play a huge role in most topics we covered. Racism and ethnocentrism, however, those things still exist in our textbooks and still need to be addressed. Or maybe that was just the way I saw it. And if there was ever sexism in my classrooms, it was the teachers preferring female students under the assumption that we were better behaved and harder working. Some female teachers were downright rude to the boys in my classes.

Same thing for anthropology, I was again lucky - our department had a lot of female instructors and everything we learned was either balanced, or sometimes even more feminist focused than I was comfortable with, I mean, after a while the point can be overstated. We also spent a lot of time talking about old and outdated anthropological theories and how they were ethnocentric and gender-centric. I mean, it sounds like a lot of the stuff you were taught, koffeewitch, were theories in vogue before feminist anthropology of the 70s and 80s. Maybe again, I've been lucky. Maybe Alberta isn't as backwards as I think!

I am avidly reading about the transgendered issues people are discussing here, but due to a lack of knowledge on the topic I don't have much to contribute. Please keep writing, though, it's very informative!
koffeewitch
angie21 - AH, as I've said I think Canada is a wonderful place in so many ways.
The particular antrhopological theory I was talking about was in the news again just some months ago unfortunately. I was in college during the 1990s and I thought that theory was too archaic for 1995, let alone having to hear MORE research on this topic AGAIN. Now granted, it could have just been a slow news day and one of the reporters was trying to start a controversy.
angie_21
QUOTE(koffeewitch @ Oct 16 2009, 09:18 AM) *
angie21 - AH, as I've said I think Canada is a wonderful place in so many ways.
The particular antrhopological theory I was talking about was in the news again just some months ago unfortunately. I was in college during the 1990s and I thought that theory was too archaic for 1995, let alone having to hear MORE research on this topic AGAIN. Now granted, it could have just been a slow news day and one of the reporters was trying to start a controversy.


Sometimes I get so mad at how dumb Canadians can be, it's nice to be reminded of what's good about our country, too. smile.gif

I'm always wary of new reports on science studies. Newspaper writers couldn't srting two concepts together coherently even if they did understand what they were reporting on. And most of the time they clearly don't understand it. They jump on easy, controvesial parts of the study that will make headlines, like comparing primate interaction to prostitution. I took my anthropology undergrad courses around 2002-2005, and I think it does take a while for older professors to catch on to the newer studies and theory. We had a lot of young, idealistic profs in my department, too.

Speaking of bad reporting of gender studies:

Horribly confusing article about a study of gender and children's chores at home from Canwest News

Compared to:

Article about the study that actually makes sense from Wall Street Journal
auralpoison
Injustice at Every Turn is a new report on the discrimination facing trans persons today. An interesting & infuriating read.
anarch
Thanks for linking that, aural. Good to have that stuff documented.
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