Stella – Montecchio, Italy

 

For one of the most moving photo series of the year, titled Toy Stories, the photographer Gabriele Galimberti (spotted via Feature Shoot) traveled the world in search of children with the toys they loved. Moving from Texas to Haiti and everywhere in between, the artist spent time with his young subjects in hopes of discovering the differences and similarities between the way children of diverse backgrounds connect to their toys.

 

Alessia – Castiglion Fiorentino, Italy

Although the toys themselves certainly carry indicators of economic status, they all mean the same thing to their proud owners: the artist tells Feature Shoot,“at their age, they are pretty all much the same; they just want to play.” The images themselves present the toys as a means of communicating; some of the children look too intimidated by the camera to speak, but the array of toys imply subtle and intimate truths. 

 

Watcharapom – Bangkok, Thailand

Galimberti’s brilliant images are especially moving because they are all framed the same way: each child sits or stands above his or her toys, claiming them under his or her domain. The pride and care given to the objects is visible; these toys read like sacred relics, meaningful mementoes over which the child alone has control. Regardless of whether the child has a single stuffed animal or a row of barbies, the earnest protectiveness over the toys is visible. Some are happy to show them off to us; others are worried, and still more simply stare at the camera in open-mouthed self-conscious curiosity. 

 

Cun Zi Yi – Chongqing, China

 

Tangawizi – Keekorok, Kenya

 

Shaira – Mumbai, India

 

Julia – Tirana, Albania

 

Norden – Massa, Morocco

 

Pavel – Kiev, Ukraine

 

Keynor – Cahuita, Costa Rica

 

Arafa & Aisha – Bububu, Zanzibar

 

Orly-Brownsville,Texas

 

Chiwa – Mchinji, Malawi

 

Botlhe – Maun, Botswana

 

Bethsaida – Port au Prince, Haiti

 

Thanks to Feature Shoot

Images via Feature Shoot

Tagged in: world, toys, Photography, gabriele galimberti, Europe, Children, asia, art, africa   

The opinions expressed on the BUST blog are those of the authors themselves and do not necessarily reflect the position of BUST Magazine or its staff.




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