Petra Collins is practically begging the media to comment on her new exhibit, Discharge, and curatorial show, Pussy Pat. In her new Pussy Pat music video, the chorus from Rihanna's  Cockiness (Love it) loops incessantly;  “I love it, I love it when you eat it.” The video features Collins and her artsy cohorts doing the new vagina-loving move. The ladies flaunt EVERYTHING that they’ve got (which is quite a lot). 

   Collins joins legions of friends and fantastically talented female artists to construct a niche within the major art scene. These innovative youngsters display their experience (and their actual dirty panties in galleries like Capricious 88 and Four81), unabashedly embracing themselves while simultaneously encouraging others to do the same. 

   Despite the recent scandal and conflict on Instagram and other social media outlets, Petra Collins shows no sign of slowing down - taking her skills to the next level and curating a second exhibition, a follow up to Gynolandscape from last September.

   Her solo show, Discharge serves as a retrospective of her first six years of work. The title is as thought provoking as her work, “[Discharge is] a natural thing that is seen as so dirty — it’s actually the body cleaning itself out, but it’s also this weird, embarrassing thing.” The sincerity and rawness of Collins' work is heartwarming and shines as a beacon of hope amidst a world of retouched photographs and flawless models. “I’ve been creating this work to cleanse myself, almost. But sometimes the work that I create is seen as gross, when it’s really this positive thing.”

You may remember Collins' last stint with allegedly "gross" body image when her instagram was removed because of allegedly "scandalous" body hair. She also received criticism earlier this year for her bloody vagina illustration, featured on an American Apparel t-shirt. Collins had plenty to say in defense of her work, and used the interaction to snowball press and attention for her efforts as a feminist and women’s advocate. Yea, girl!

Her work displays teenage nostalgia, longing, angst and passion. The careful use of color and texture instill the viewer with the sensation that these photos are an intimate diary. They have a familiarity to them, feeling reminiscent to days of first hickeys and first tries at harnessing the power of lipstick. Collins said, “The show has a lot to do with the body and self-reflection. In my early work, I have a lot of photos of girls getting ready or looking at themselves in the mirror — observing themselves or observing themselves being observed by others.”

Collins chews up pop culture, teenage lust, and all the negative attention on the female body, and spits it out into a beautiful and powerful philosophical punch. Ever so slowly, the presence of female artists. Mad respect!




Photos courtesy of The Ardorous, Petra Collins and Muddguts.

   Collins joins legions of friends and fantastically talented female artists to construct a niche within the major art scene. These innovative youngsters display their experience (and their actual dirty panties in galleries like Capricious 88 and Four81), unabashedly embracing themselves while simultaneously encouraging others to do the same. 

   Despite the recent scandal and conflict on Instagram and other social media outlets, Petra Collins shows no sign of slowing down - taking her skills to the next level and curating a second exhibition, a follow up to Gynolandscape from last September.

   Her solo show, Discharge serves as a retrospective of her first six years of work. The title is as thought provoking as her work, “[Discharge is] a natural thing that is seen as so dirty — it’s actually the body cleaning itself out, but it’s also this weird, embarrassing thing.” The sincerity and rawness of Collins' work is heartwarming and shines as a beacon of hope amidst a world of retouched photographs and flawless models. “I’ve been creating this work to cleanse myself, almost. But sometimes the work that I create is seen as gross, when it’s really this positive thing.”

You may remember Collins' last stint with allegedly "gross" body image when her instagram was removed because of allegedly "scandalous" body hair. She also received criticism earlier this year for her bloody vagina illustration, featured on an American Apparel t-shirt. Collins had plenty to say in defense of her work, and used the interaction to snowball press and attention for her efforts as a feminist and women’s advocate. Yea, girl!

Her work displays teenage nostalgia, longing, angst and passion. The careful use of color and texture instill the viewer with the sensation that these photos are an intimate diary. They have a familiarity to them, feeling reminiscent to days of first hickeys and first tries at harnessing the power of lipstick. Collins said, “The show has a lot to do with the body and self-reflection. In my early work, I have a lot of photos of girls getting ready or looking at themselves in the mirror — observing themselves or observing themselves being observed by others.”

Collins chews up pop culture, teenage lust, and all the negative attention on the female body, and spits it out into a beautiful and powerful philosophical punch. Ever so slowly, the presence of female artists. Mad respect!




Photos courtesy of The Ardorous, Petra Collins and Muddguts.

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Tagged in: vaginas, rihanna, pussy pat, Power, petra collins, girl empowerment, gallery openings, galleries, female empowerment, discharge, art, American Apparel   

The opinions expressed on the BUST blog are those of the authors themselves and do not necessarily reflect the position of BUST Magazine or its staff.




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