Tag » art
In Alabama it's illegal to have an ice cream cone in your pocket at all times   The critic Susan Sontag wrote that photography, like no other medium, has the power to condemn or implicate. Crime scene images evidence wrongdoings; we take photographs as proof of something illicit. In her series I Fought the Law, young photographer Olivia Locher cleverly subverts what we think of when we think of crime and bad behavior.  Scouring the nation for absurd ... Read More
The fashion photographer Tim Walker is known for his work with young ladies like Kate Moss; in his new book, he explores the nature of the photographic eye as it pertains to old age. In The Granny Alphabet, he views “the dying breed of little old ladies who live down the lane” with awe and curiosity.  Inspired by his childhood memories of his own grandmothers, he somehow aims to make sense of both old age and infancy: “children and the ... Read More
  Sylvia Plath is known mostly for her poetry and prose, but arguably the same degree of violent, exuberant feeling may be found in her sketch work, now published in a volume entitled Sylvia Plath: Drawings. Edited by the poet’s own daughter Frieda Hughes, the text cradles her pen-and-ink drawings with diary entries and letters.      Plath created the illustrations at Cambridge, and used studied art as a way of coping with and ... Read More
  If you’ve ever seen Toddlers & Tiaras, you’ve probably noticed that its allure lies in large part in our society’s obsession with what many consider to be unnatural or freakish. The beauty pageants shown take female beauty ideals to a upsetting extreme of sexualized infancy; toddlers parade on stage in Pretty Woman’s prostitute outfit and the like, wearing heavy make-up and fake adult teeth. So much of the series’s premise ... Read More
Yoko Ono's newest video for her track "Bad Dancer" is what all music videos should aspire to be: part funky-fresh music, part all-star dance-party, part totally WTF-worthy. It's essentially what would happen if a bunch of kickass musicians got together for a high school art project.  In the clip, she and her crew--featuring Ira Glass, Questlove, and Roberta Flack among others--get weird in what appears to be Andy Warhol's Factory (but without cocaine on ... Read More
Harmony Hammond. Suture, 2002.   The Lesbian Herstory Archives, an awesome ongoing collection of political and culturally relevant records of lesbian lives and herstory is hosting an art benefit, and it’s going to be really incredible.  Harmony Hammond, the artist and writer behind Heresies: A Feminist Publication of Art and Politics and Lesbian Art in America will present her current exhibition. As if that wasn’t enough, artists from ... Read More
  I am so sick of the lame old stereotype “women are more emotional than men.” Aside from being blatantly false, it does damage. Often, women are disrespected in the workplace if we get heated over something important, or we’re told to “stop PMS-ing” if we have a personal drama. I will always remember the Sex and the City episode in which Samantha Jones is berated for being a working woman and cries only when she gets in the ... Read More
  I once met a female construction worker. When discussing her job, she actually teared up. Not only is she paid less than her male peers because she physically cannot lift as much as many of them can, but she also faces sexual harassment on a daily basis; she is called “weak” and “a little girl,” and she hid the fact that she was gay for fear of bullying.    The artist Susan Eisenberg’s “On Equal Terms,” a ... Read More
  The conflicts and intersections of craft and art are marked in large part by gender and cultural stereotypes. For a long time, craft was associated with the female, working within the home: a suit patch, a blanket. Craft was practical, but fine art was the stuff of the male-dominated realms; images produced were for public consumption, philosophical discourse, and political inquiry. It wasn’t until Judy Chicago’s patchwork fabric and ceramic ... Read More
  In 1865, Mark Twain wrote a picture book entitled “Advice To Little Girls.” The book is delightfully illustrated by Vladimir Radunsky, who whimsically juxtaposes doodles that you might expect in a child’s diary with rich watercolor-esque renderings of the human form. Infused with this sketchbook-inspired world, are powerful and progressive life lessons for girls.      Twain’s text suggests that although children ... Read More
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