Tag » body positivity
  Barbie’s place in adolescence and constructed femininity has baffled psychologists and feminist alike: on one hand, she’s a patient confidante onto which girls might project their hopes and aspirations. But she also espouses limited and damaging views on female roles, bodies, and sexuality. She sends conflicting messages, passively listening to you for hours while remaining inhumanly cold. As girls, we intuitively pick up that Barbie is ... Read More
  We all know that heavily Photoshopped images don’t accurately depict the human form, yet it’s still easy to become lulled into believing that idealized bodies are relatively uniform. Photographic subjects are too often deemed attractive or not, depending on seemingly arbitrary cultural ideologies. We see fine art and the media portray women as familiar hourglasses; men are often pictured with authoritative stances and broad ... Read More
Chrystal Bougon, the owner of plus-size lingerie store Curvy Girl, is encouraged to see more plus-size models these days, but she thinks it might not be enough. After all, “anything over size 4 is considered plus-size,” she says. And most are photoshopped. She is “constantly asked for pictures of [her] products on 'regular' bodies,” bodies without any airbrushing or editing. In her “Regular Women” campaign, she delivers by ... Read More
  As children, many of us turn to our toys to navigate our developing identities. Sometimes, our dolls serve as surrogates; we parent them the way we see our children parenting us, and we identify with them. Photography operates similarly: as teens, we might dog-ear or collect magazine images that appeal to our expanding sense of self. Since so many dolls and photographs in mainstream fashion magazines present a grossly limited definition of femininity, it ... Read More
Eliezer Álvarez, owner of a small mannequin factory in Valencia, Venezuela, has created the kind of woman he believes the public desires—one with, as the New York Times reports, “a bulging bosom and cantilevered buttocks, a wasp waist and long legs, a fiberglass fantasy, Venezuelan style.” With the introduction of his new mannequins, Álvarez witnessed an incredible surge in sales, and now, these horribly inaccurate portrayals of the ... Read More
  The Abercrombie brand has been suffering lately, big time. In addition to being what the analyst Richard Jafffe calls “a stale brand” that is incapable of competing with trendier companies, the company, led by CEO Mike Jeffies, has been pretty sexist in their marketing strategies. Girls are taking note; no one wants to buy clothes from a company that sexualizes young girls and “hates fat chicks.”    And we ladies are voting ... Read More
  Women come in all shapes and sizes. Plastic mannequins, on the other hand, rarely do.  The average woman in the UK is a size 16, but most British stores only display size 10 mannequins. The British women’s and equalities minister Jo Swinson has long been combating the narrow focus on thinner, whiter, younger models of feminine beauty in fashion; she writes, “[the image] is reinforced from the catwalks right through to shop ... Read More
Ana Casas Broda, "Kinderwunsch (Ana Playroom V)," from the Playroom series 2010. Photography, as a medium, is inextricably bound to the idea of motherhood. We see mothers (and fathers) everywhere snapping pictures of their infants. Art critic Roland Barthes rooted his discussion of the emotional power of photographs in an image he found of his mother after her death. Photography gives us a means of capturing something we know will soon be lost: the ... Read More
  Former BUST cover girl and forever BUST favorite Miranda July is at it again! We love her use of Craigslist and online interactions and transactions, always managing to make them feel meaningful and insightful. In her newest Craigslist advertisement, July searches for portrait subjects living in the Los Angeles area. The photo series will explore “why women dress the way they do” and will feature women of various races, ages, and ... Read More
We all know and love Dr. Seuss’s brilliant children’s books, texts, and artworks that taught us that love and compassion for every living soul can be magical; after all, “A person’s a person no matter how small.” His work has helped countless children navigate the confusion and excitement of growing up, made our futures seem full of endless fantasy: “Kid, you’ll move mountains!”  But guess what? He also wrote a ... Read More
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