Tag » women in science
We are super psyched for one of our favorite feminist-graphic-artist-memoirists, Alison Bechdel, who, we just found out, is a 2014 MacArthur Fellow. That means that Bechdel now has $625,000 to use for snacks while writing and drawing about the complexities of queer lifestyles and histories. We look forward to seeing what kind of creativity that amount of snacks can produce. If I only had that much money for cashews... Each year, based on a kind of mysterious ... Read More
Apparently, cell phones can do more harm to us than simply getting us in trouble for playing Candy Crush and perusing Twitter in class. Grrreat.  What is actually great, though, is that this scientific discovery was made by none other than a group of ninth grade girls. Go young women in STEM! According to a new experiment carried out by five ninth graders at Hjallerup School in Denmark, the radiation emitted by cell phones can have a detrimental effect on life ... Read More
Dr. Danielle N. Lee is an animal behavior and ecology post-doc biologist, a hip-hop maven, and a contributing blogger for Scientific American. As stated on Scientific American’s website, Lee’s section, “The Urban Scientist,” focuses on “urban ecology, evolutionary biology & diversity in the sciences.” Recently, Lee was approached by a Biology Online blog editor, whose name is known as “Ofek,” to the guest ... Read More
Ahh Wikipedia...truly my oldest and most treasured childhood friend. Without ye, so many A- papers would be mere C+’s...So many useless facts would remain unknown...Truly a bleak world would exist if not for Wikipedia. Yet, statistics show that less than 15% of Wikipedia contributors are female. Could it be that my heart and soul has been devoted the most patriarchal website of them all?! Say it ain’t so! The debate on why such a huge gender gap exists ... Read More
  When I was a preteen, I was busy riding my pony and studying geometry. Thirteen-year-old Sushma Verma has a very different early teenage life. The girl, living in Lucknow, India, just earned her undergraduate degree and is enrolled in a master’s program for microbiology.    Her story gets even more amazing. Her family is relatively impoverished, and she lives with her parents and three siblings in a one-room apartment. The do not have a ... Read More
Whenever I come across an article about the world’s latest wonder-child, I think back to how my ten-year-old self was incapable of accomplishing little more than consuming every episode of Sailor Moon. But the youths of today are a whole different story. Motivation? Vegetables? Science?! This time, a 13-year-old has revolutionized the way humans and pets can interact with each other at long-distances. Brooke Martin, who just started the ninth grade, is the ... Read More
On a day-to-day basis, my feelings towards science are complicated at best. As a biology major in college, I’m in constant duress – by science’s unforgiving long hours, its strenuous lab reports, its difficult tests, its high standards. As a member of the general public, however, I can’t ignore science’s unfailing neglect of female scholars; studies show that prestigious scientific honors are awarded to males more than 95% of the time ... Read More
When I was in junior high school, I went to a “Women in Science” event at the local university. I learned about solar panels (awesome), and I got to feed a deadly centipede from South America through a tube (creepy and awesome). It was great to be exposed to women working in science, because it made me feel like I could do it too. Sadly, these types of programs are few and far between. The gender gap in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) ... Read More
We wrote about the European Commission’s epic fail of a video campaign to promote women in science back in June. Their video’s slogan, “Science: it’s a girl thing!” was accompanied by just enough makeup, nail polish, and cliché girly images to trigger your gag reflex. If you’re brave enough, you can watch it below. After the disastrous (and completely warranted) response of every logical being on the planet, they ... Read More
A study by Yale scientists has shown that academic scientists are, on average, biased against women. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), tested scientists’ reactions to men and women with exactly equal qualifications. In the study, academic scientists — both men and women — were given an application from a student applying for a lab manager position. The applications were all identical, but some had ... Read More
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