From Mrs. Dalloway to To The Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf’s stories of human connection, empathy, and love span immeasurable distances of time, space, and circumstance; in their most resonant moments, her words make the complexities of our individual minds seem a little less isolating. To my utter delight, Brain Pickings’s Maria recently Popova recently offered the internet this glimpse into the emotional and intellectual realm of a 15-year-old Woolf. 

 

At 13, Woolf suffered her first psychoemotional episode following the death of her mother in 1895. Two years later, Woolf opened to a page in her journal and wrote, “I think I see for a moment how our minds are threaded together — how any live mind is of the very same stuff as Plato’s & Euripides. It is only a continuation & development of the same thing. It is this common mind that binds the whole world together; & all the world is mind.” Following the years of her grief, her gorgeous passage intwines us all, inextricably tying us together even within the uncertain context of death. 

 

More of Woolf’s journal entries are available in Passionate Apprentice: The Early Journals, 1897-1909

 

Correction: The title of this post should read, "Virginia Woolf Wrote These Three Magnificent Sentences In Her Teenage Diary"

 

Thanks to Brain Pickings

Image via Jackee Holder

Tagged in: writing, virginia woolf, turn of the century, to the lighthouse, the human mind, teenage girls, plato, passionate apprentice, mrs dalloway, euripides   

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